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  1. #101

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    Learning how to use Tritone Substitutions was my latest. It helped me to easily come up with substitutions to blues progressions that still sound very 'bluesy'.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102
    Wow what a great thread...theres so many but i'd say:

    1) The realization that intervallic equivalents can be used harmonically, like for instance if a scale has a #2 and M3, the #2 can be interpreted as a b3 so the scale works over a minor chord...the VI chord of harmonic minor has a lot of options in this manner.

    2) The realization that if i divide all 12 notes into 3 or 4 note collections I can use all 12 to create tonal centers while still retaining a kind of atonal quality.

    3) Dunno if this counts as theory, but basically that just because I suck at playing by ear doesn't mean I can't write by ear...I basically just hum a melody I'm hearing in my head into a recording mic, making sure to audit my notes clearly and slowly...then I play it back and transcribe it to guitar...for me, trying to figure it out directly from my head to guitar always ends up with me losing the melody I had, so this was a simple solution...I can also use it directly in conjunction with theory by introducing a specific note collection (arp or scale) to my brain by playing on it a bit before letting my brain come up with a melody using those notes...of course in practice my brain will automatically add notes even if I'm being tonally deliberate lol...not that that's a bad thing.

  4. #103

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    It's very basic and elemental. But years ago I realized that if I could play a scale and count the degrees I could build cooler chords. Still, to this day, I think it's cool. No matter how simple.

  5. #104

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    Most recently my big A-HA! moment came working with Jordan Klemons' method. If you're not following his threads, it's hard to explain, but doing some stuff he recommended got me to hear in a way that allows me to hear extensions as points of resolution, and I always had trouble with that before.
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg

  6. #105

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    "AHA! I have to work my a** off to have more of these 'aha! moments"

    -me, every day.

  7. #106

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    Recent a-ha for me has been regarding comping...

    I've been working for a while now to stop "chasing changes" when soloing...but it applies to accompanyment too!
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  8. #107

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Recent a-ha for me has been regarding comping...

    I've been working for a while now to stop "chasing changes" when soloing...but it applies to accompanyment too!
    I'm curious to learn how you can avoid the changes when comping?....

    As for aha! moments, I'm sure I've had plenty, but when I look back, I either struggle to remember them, or they now seem so obvious that it would be embarrassing to mention them!

  9. #108

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    I'd imagine it'd mean something like not having to comp every single chord that passes by, and instead picking out important harmonic movements to emphasize.

    For example, generalizing on the first 4 of rhythm changes, not feeling the need to voice something new for every 1-6-2-5 that passes by, but rather just get the point across of what's happening (I-V). Or choosing to layout if the soloist is filling enough space on their own.

    Context is of course important, whether it be uptempo bop, ballads, and also depends on the size/instrumentation of the ensemble (Are you solely responsible for harmonic context? Is it a slow tempo where more harmonic movement is needed to keep it interesting?) It involves playing what you think is needed and not feeling strung along by the symbols on the page (or in your head).

    That's my best guess.

  10. #109

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    I've been looking at the wrong scale.
    If you can distinguish between rehearsing and practicing...you're better than half way there!

  11. #110

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    I have been looking for ways to view all possible ways I can arrange any of the 12 notes in equal temperament tuning. Its more of a math thing not music necesarilly. From this I have found a few symmetrical structures I haven't come across yet such as.. !

    The tritone scale and how there are actually 3 different types of tritone scales! Basing it from the symmetrical diminished I get these formulas

    1) 1,b2,3,#4,5,b7 (this one is the most common)
    2) 1,b2,b3,#4,5,6
    3) 1,#2,3,#4,6,b7 (never heard of this one before but it sounds pretty interesting!)

    And this one weird 4 note chord I never came across but symmetrically it has the same property as the 7b5 as you can play it a tritone away and it has the same set of notes.

    1,#4,5,b9

    There are of course the symmetrical 8-note scales such as

    1) 1,b2,2,b3,b5,5,b6,6
    2) 1,b2,2,3,b5,5,b6,b7

    And these also have tritone symmetric qualities.. sounds pretty far out!

  12. #111

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    Interestingly 5 and 7 note scales don't have a symmetrical scale (in the sense of whole tone or diminished scales). So yeah.. fun fact!

  13. #112

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    The C chromatic scale, dissected in fourths.
    If you can distinguish between rehearsing and practicing...you're better than half way there!

  14. #113

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazznylon View Post
    interestingly 5 and 7 note scales don't have a symmetrical scale (in the sense of whole tone or diminished scales). So yeah.. Fun fact!
    math

  15. #114

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    Recent aha moment - how to actually 'hear' and feel the Fender clean sound. Sounds stupid, I know.

  16. #115

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    Realizing rhythm (and accent) is everything. You can play the "wrong" note, in time, and it will sound "right".

    Most people focus on harmony and melody at the expense of this concept.

    Another aha moment would be that "less is more" most times. One note placed perfectly in a phrase is more musically powerful than a fancy run of notes. Technically impressive? No, but being tastefully impressive is well...more musically impressive.

  17. #116

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    Chord Inversons for harmonies

  18. #117

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    Aha! moment, when I realized that there is a relationship between the number of sharps and flats in key signatures.

    C key = no sharps/ flats | C# = 7 sharps | Cb = 7 flats ! 0 + 7 = 7
    G key = 1 sharp | Gb = 6 flats | 1 + 6 = 7
    D key = 2 sharps | Db = 5 flats | 2 + 5 = 7
    A key = 3 sharps | Ab = 4 flats | 3 + 4 = 7
    E key = 4 sharps | Eb = 3 flats | 4 + 3 = 7
    B key = 5 sharps | Bb = 2 flats | 5 + 2 = 7
    F# key = 6 sharps | F = 1 flat | 6 + 1 = 7
    If you don't like the learning process you probably know less than you could.
    Learning Brazilian Guitar

  19. #118

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    Quote Originally Posted by rcandro View Post
    Aha! moment, when I realized that there is a relationship between the number of sharps and flats in key signatures.

    C key = no sharps/ flats | C# = 7 sharps | Cb = 7 flats ! 0 + 7 = 7
    G key = 1 sharp | Gb = 6 flats | 1 + 6 = 7
    D key = 2 sharps | Db = 5 flats | 2 + 5 = 7
    A key = 3 sharps | Ab = 4 flats | 3 + 4 = 7
    E key = 4 sharps | Eb = 3 flats | 4 + 3 = 7
    B key = 5 sharps | Bb = 2 flats | 5 + 2 = 7
    F# key = 6 sharps | F = 1 flat | 6 + 1 = 7
    There is likely a logical explanation to that, but I can't yet figure it out . Any idea ?
    Perfection is in the Details, but Perfection isn't a Detail (Leonardo da Vinci)

  20. #119

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhch View Post
    There is likely a logical explanation to that, but I can't yet figure it out . Any idea ?
    Very simple. Taking the D major key as an example we have the following notes:

    D - E - F# - G - A - B - C#

    If we lower all notes in a half step, the natural notes will become flat notes, and the sharp notes will become natural notes. In this case, as we have a group of 7 notes with 5 natural notes and 2 sharp notes in the scale, we will get 5 flat notes and 2 natural notes.

    Db - Eb - F - Gb - Ab - Bb - C
    If you don't like the learning process you probably know less than you could.
    Learning Brazilian Guitar

  21. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by rcandro View Post
    Aha! moment, when I realized that there is a relationship between the number of sharps and flats in key signatures.

    C key = no sharps/ flats | C# = 7 sharps | Cb = 7 flats ! 0 + 7 = 7
    G key = 1 sharp | Gb = 6 flats | 1 + 6 = 7
    D key = 2 sharps | Db = 5 flats | 2 + 5 = 7
    A key = 3 sharps | Ab = 4 flats | 3 + 4 = 7
    E key = 4 sharps | Eb = 3 flats | 4 + 3 = 7
    B key = 5 sharps | Bb = 2 flats | 5 + 2 = 7
    F# key = 6 sharps | F = 1 flat | 6 + 1 = 7
    Perhaps a related way of "thinking" Rcandro; I was struck many years ago when I noticed that between neighboring keys, the sharps or flats and natural tones "invert", that is
    D = D,E F#,G A B C#,D
    Db=Db,Eb,F,Gb,Ab,Bb,C,D
    so the F# and C# of D become the only "not flatted" F and C notes of Db

    F major has but one accidental, Bb, then move up to F#major and B becomes the only note that isn't "sharpped".
    This helped me back when I was more solid in some keys than others, I could sort of cross reference things; I might not feel solid about Db but I could quickly lean on knowing that every note is "flat" except F and C.

    Go ahead and tell me if this sounds twisted, but I did use it.
    Ignorance is agony.



  22. #121

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    Different Aha ....

    ii V I in C

    If you play Db7 (TT sub for G7)
    stuff over the G7 ....
    And you play 'In' Db7 sounds
    You get the 'out' sounds on G7

    If you see what I mean ?

  23. #122

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    Possibly the moment I discovered the 13b9 chord...

  24. #123

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    Here are a few of my "aha's", in roughly chronological order:

    1. Understanding 'key of the moment'. I knew basic analysis and could put Roman numerals to a song with harmony as far afield as, say, V of III, but "All The Things You Are" had me stumped, until I got this concept.

    2. Realizing that rhythm is the most important part. I was playing a written part in a recording session. When the rhythm was off the engineer and the producer knew right away and we needed another take; when the rhythm was right, they asked ME if I had played the right notes.

    3. Tuning my guitar in P4 for the first time.

    4. Starting to understand Solfege -- knowing what scale degree you are on; knowing it well enough to sing it.

    5. Realizing that you can practice in your head.

    6. Understanding that people have very different strengths and weaknesses in music, as in everything else.

    7. Realizing that people disagree fundamentally on what is good, interesting, appropriate or right in music and in EVERYTHING else.