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  1. #1

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    I feel somewhat endorsed by Reg (the originator of the Practical Standards series, circa 2010) and Howie (the able keeper of the flame for these past years), so I'd like to continue the tradition, as I suggested in this thread: Suggestion for Practical Standards Participants

    I went back and collated Jehu's Practical Standard's list (Practical Standards Song List and Index) with the 1,000 jazz standards list at jazzstandards.com and, amazingly enough, while we had a run at Body and Soul (the no. 1 song on the jazzstandards list) back in Sept 2011, apparently we never had a go at no. 2 on the list -- All the Things You Are. To add some weight (as if that was necessary), ATTYA is listed no. 1 on the Woodshed list of 300. I'd be surprised if it wasn't similarly featured on many (all?) such lists.

    So, our tune for Nov 2016 will be Jerome Kern's All the Things You Are.

    If this selection seems too worn and thread-bare for you, consider an unfamiliar key, a different time signature, a different style, a complete reharmonization, etc.

    I intend to keep the thread titles in a format consistent with this post, so that they might more easily be found in the future. Granted, I shortened "Practical Standards" to "PS" to diminish the potential title lengths. I hope that will work for everyone.
    Last edited by M-ster; 11-20-2016 at 03:07 PM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Nice one M-Ster. This is a tune that one can NEVER take for granted. I found that out again the other night.

    I tend to play this one in 3/4. It's common to take the A section in 3 and the B section in 4, which keeps you awake.

    I might try taking this one through the keys. I have a colleague who did this on piano to prove a point to someone on the internet.


  4. #3

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    Brilliant.happiest day of that Metronomes Life

  5. #4

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    Hi all,

    8 measures intro, four choruses:

    Attached Files Attached Files
    Same lick, different day

  6. #5

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    You can get your organ trio on with Barcia's .mp3 backing track. Nice!

  7. #6

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    By coincidence, I was searching today for information on TI Bebops vs Swings and found this in a thread from 2010.



    I'm finding this video quite motivating - but it is still going to take me some time to get this down.
    Have no secrets, hear no lies.

  8. #7

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    Does anyone know the VERSE for this song?

    (Barry Harris covered this in a class once. He was very disparaging about the Db7 C7 intro thing which I found amusing since Bird and Diz came up with it.)

    Last edited by christianm77; 11-05-2016 at 04:12 PM.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by newsense View Post
    By coincidence, I was searching today for information on TI Bebops vs Swings and found this in a thread from 2010.



    I'm finding this video quite motivating - but it is still going to take me some time to get this down.
    The moment I wake up
    Before I put on my makeup
    I say a little pray for you
    While combing my hair now
    And wondering what dress to wear now
    I say a little prayer for you

  10. #9

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    OK, here's my Barry Harris scale breakdown for this tune. Haven't proofread this so there might be mistakes. The middle eight looks mental with those accidentals, but for non-readers, here's the scale breakdown

    1-7 for 1 bar scales, 1-7-1 for 2 bar scales, 7-1 when running a scale down to the third.

    Fm7 --> Ab major (I) (Fm7=Ab6)
    Bbm7 Eb7 --> Eb dominant (V)
    Abmaj7 --> Ab major (I)
    Dbmaj7 --> Db major (IV)
    Dm7b5 G7b9 --> Bb dominant down to the third of G7 (II7)
    Cmaj7 --> C major (III)

    Then, same thing in Eb major.

    Middle 8 is easy
    Am7 D7 --> D dominant
    Gmaj7 --> G major
    F#m7 B7 --> B dominant
    Emaj7 --> E major
    C7b9 --> Eb dominant down to the third of C7

    Fm7 --> Ab major (Fm7=Ab6)
    Bbm7 Eb7 --> Eb dominant
    Abmaj7 --> Ab major
    Dbmaj7 --> Db major
    Gb7 --> Gb dominant
    Ab/C --> Ab major
    Bo7 --> Bb7 down to the third of G7 (?)
    Bbm7 Eb7 --> Eb dominant
    Abmaj7 --> Ab major

    Run in all positions, octaves etc and you will be in an excellent position to solo on the tune.

    Attachment 37184
    Last edited by christianm77; 11-05-2016 at 04:58 PM.

  11. #10

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    (I know, nothing to it right? :-D)

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    OK, here's my Barry Harris scale breakdown for this tune. Haven't proofread this so there might be mistakes. The middle eight looks mental with those accidentals, but for non-readers, here's the scale breakdown

    1-7 for 1 bar scales, 1-7-1 for 2 bar scales, 7-1 when running a scale down to the third.

    Fm7 --> Ab major (I) (Fm7=Ab6)
    Bbm7 Eb7 --> Eb dominant (V)
    Abmaj7 --> Ab major (I)
    Dbmaj7 --> Db major (IV)
    Dm7b5 G7b9 --> Bb dominant down to the third of G7 (II7)
    Cmaj7 --> C major (III)

    Then, same thing in Eb major.

    Middle 8 is easy
    Am7 D7 --> D dominant
    Gmaj7 --> G major
    F#m7 B7 --> B dominant
    Emaj7 --> E major
    C7b9 --> Eb dominant down to the third of C7

    Fm7 --> Ab major (Fm7=Ab6)
    Bbm7 Eb7 --> Eb dominant
    Abmaj7 --> Ab major
    Dbmaj7 --> Db major
    Gb7 --> Gb dominant
    Ab/C --> Ab major
    Bo7 --> Bb7 down to the third of G7 (?)
    Bbm7 Eb7 --> Eb dominant
    Abmaj7 --> Ab major

    Run in all positions, octaves etc and you will be in an excellent position to solo on the tune.

    Attachment 37184



    Initially, I must say I thought that this isn't how I approach the tune, as I tend to anchor off chord tones and then build out scales and accidentals from there as the glue to target and connect, however this is actually correct in the way the the key centers moves. I might add that I can't resist turning F#m7 B7 --> B dominant into a minor 7th b5 as the melody works either way, and the C7 I flip to a 7#5 as the third of E Maj becomes the #5 of C7 and then becomes the minor 3 of Fm7 .....a nice voice leading device

    Oh, and the Am7 to D7th just before that can be a minor 7th b5 too

    Thanks for posting....


    PS.... excuse me, the ireal chart show the B half diminished and #5 already on it, so I ain't so clever after all. I must have read that in a chart somewhere.
    Last edited by docdosco; 11-05-2016 at 07:46 PM.

  13. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    OK, here's my Barry Harris scale breakdown for this tune. Haven't proofread this so there might be mistakes. The middle eight looks mental with those accidentals, but for non-readers, here's the scale breakdown

    1-7 for 1 bar scales, 1-7-1 for 2 bar scales, 7-1 when running a scale down to the third.

    Fm7 --> Ab major (I) (Fm7=Ab6)
    Bbm7 Eb7 --> Eb dominant (V)
    Abmaj7 --> Ab major (I)
    Dbmaj7 --> Db major (IV)
    Dm7b5 G7b9 --> Bb dominant down to the third of G7 (II7)
    Cmaj7 --> C major (III)

    Then, same thing in Eb major.

    Middle 8 is easy
    Am7 D7 --> D dominant
    Gmaj7 --> G major
    F#m7 B7 --> B dominant
    Emaj7 --> E major
    C7b9 --> Eb dominant down to the third of C7

    Fm7 --> Ab major (Fm7=Ab6)
    Bbm7 Eb7 --> Eb dominant
    Abmaj7 --> Ab major
    Dbmaj7 --> Db major
    Gb7 --> Gb dominant
    Ab/C --> Ab major
    Bo7 --> Bb7 down to the third of G7 (?)
    Bbm7 Eb7 --> Eb dominant
    Abmaj7 --> Ab major

    Run in all positions, octaves etc and you will be in an excellent position to solo on the tune.

    Attachment 37184
    So, nat 11's on the IV chords?

  14. #13

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    Can't be. It's got to be raised to stay in key

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by docdosco View Post
    Can't be. It's got to be raised to stay in key
    I know what I wrote.

    Take it up with Barry Harris. ;-)

    Natural 11ths on dominants are fine if that's what you want when you are soloing. He was quite clear with respect to this in Cherokee with the Ab7. The melody note is D in the tune, which makes the chord what jazzers would call a Ab7#11, but when soloing he said Ab dominant with the normal 4th was fine.

    You could of course substitute (melodic) minor on the 5th of the chord, but that's another exercise.

    It's a school. Very specific.

  16. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I know what I wrote.

    Take it up with Barry Harris. ;-)

    Natural 11ths on dominants are fine if that's what you want when you are soloing. He was quite clear with respect to this in Cherokee with the Ab7. The melody note is D in the tune, which makes the chord what jazzers would call a Ab7#11, but when soloing he said Ab dominant with the normal 4th was fine.

    You could of course substitute (melodic) minor on the 5th of the chord, but that's another exercise.

    It's a school. Very specific.
    Not talking about dominant though. I'm talking about the Gb on the IV chord - Dbmaj.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by docdosco View Post
    Initially, I must say I thought that this isn't how I approach the tune, as I tend to anchor off chord tones and then build out scales and accidentals from there as the glue to target and connect, however this is actually correct in the way the the key centers moves. I might add that I can't resist turning F#m7 B7 --> B dominant into a minor 7th b5 as the melody works either way, and the C7 I flip to a 7#5 as the third of E Maj becomes the #5 of C7 and then becomes the minor 3 of Fm7 .....a nice voice leading device

    Oh, and the Am7 to D7th just before that can be a minor 7th b5 too

    Thanks for posting....


    PS.... excuse me, the ireal chart show the B half diminished and #5 already on it, so I ain't so clever after all. I must have read that in a chart somewhere.
    Your way of thinking is different to the BH school. You will be assimilated. Resistance is futile...

    Err sorry... I meant to say .... It's a drill. Not a drill that will bore into your brain so that we can implant bebop cybernetics, but rather an example of a very stock way of practicing scales over a chord progression that Barry students will apply to pretty much everything.

    It's not terribly sophisticated harmonically, but if you run it, it will make you better at soloing through the tune, I guarantee it.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Not talking about dominant though. I'm talking about the Gb on the IV chord - Dbmaj.
    Gotcha, misread that.

    Yeah, I thought the way that sounded was more Barry, the Db Lydian seemed a bit alien/modern/non-bebop to my ears, even though it's for one bar.

    YMMV, carry on with Ab major there if you like. It makes it simpler. Alan! What do you think?
    Last edited by christianm77; 11-05-2016 at 08:20 PM.

  19. #18

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    Well, I guess one can force whatever against whatever if it's done right.

    We are talking about the 4 chord of Ab, the Dbmaj correct? and the note in question is the Gb as opposed to the G natural?

    I realize that 4ths and #11 are interchangable or substitutable in certain instances (lydian concept ??? if I recall my theory....or maybe it's called something else) and that the 4ths can simply be omitted. Joe Pass liked to do this to avoid the flavor of either 4th in certain places. Major scale, drop the 4th.

  20. #19

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    Ah, I see.

    When I sing, the raised 4th is natural to my ear. However like I said, both can be used together, one as a passing tone to the other. Maybe it would amount to some kind of 8 note bebop scale. I'd have to check as the 3 I am familiar with are based on:

    mixolydian bebop, dorian bebop, major bebop

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by docdosco View Post
    Well, I guess one can force whatever against whatever if it's done right.

    We are talking about the 4 chord of Ab, the Dbmaj correct? and the note in question is the Gb as opposed to the G natural?

    I realize that 4ths and #11 are interchangable or substitutable in certain instances (lydian concept ??? if I recall my theory....or maybe it's called something else) and that the 4ths can simply be omitted. Joe Pass liked to do this to avoid the flavor of either 4th in certain places. Major scale, drop the 4th.
    This isn't CST, lydian concept, any of that gas - we aren't concerned here with the vertical relationship over every note in the scale, only the ones that are rhythmically important. The other notes are simply dissonant passing tones:

    Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C

    We run up to the 7th because that puts the chord tones of Dbmaj7- bold - on the beat. It's not terribly important what you do with note 4 here because it is a non-harmonic passing tone, but - I did prefer the sound of the Gb - made it feel like the tonality had moved decisively to Db which seemed stylistic to me.

    TBH if we are going to get into in depth discussion of the BH school might be best to do this on the Barry Harris thread before this becomes completely derailed. These questions aren't so much about the song itself as general principles.
    Last edited by christianm77; 11-05-2016 at 08:29 PM.

  22. #21

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    mixolydian is a dominant scale that adds the b7 and maj 7th

    dorian adds the b3 and maj3

    major bebop is the 4 and b5

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    This isn't CST, so we aren't concerned with the vertical relationship over every note in the scale, only the ones that are rhythmically important. The other notes are simply dissonant passing tones:

    Db Eb F Gb Ab Bb C

    We run up to the 7th because that puts the chord tones of Dbmaj7- bold - on the beat. It's not terribly important what you do with note 4 here because it is a non-harmonic passing tone, but - I did prefer the sound of the Gb - made it feel like the tonality had moved decisively to Db which seemed stylistic to me.

    TBH if we are going to get into in depth discussion of the BH school might be best to do this on the Barry Harris thread before this becomes completely derailed. These questions aren't so much about the song itself as general principles.



    It's OK with me. I am just trying to get the idea of which way is which with the diagram here.

    I play that part harmonically with the key, but that's not the 'correct' way. It's just one way. I always liked Barry Harris's approach, BTW

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    It's not terribly sophisticated harmonically, but if you run it, it will make you better at soloing through the tune, I guarantee it.

    Ha! I am not quite a neophyte. However I am always open to new things.

    Did I mention I used to play a live duo with Joe Albany in the 80's? He was Charlie Parker's piano player in the LA years. Therefore through a process of osmosis and hanging out......and no particular skill on my part, I absorbed second hand, twice removed, 30 years later, bebop from the source .... yuk yuk

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by docdosco View Post
    Ah, I see.

    When I sing, the raised 4th is natural to my ear. However like I said, both can be used together, one as a passing tone to the other. Maybe it would amount to some kind of 8 note bebop scale. I'd have to check as the 3 I am familiar with are based on:

    mixolydian bebop, dorian bebop, major bebop
    Ahhh the natural 4th. The most interesting note in the major scale, and the modern jazzers get rid of it. :-)

    Anyway, whether or not you would sing a 4th would surely depend on context. A natural 4th is likely what most people would sing in an ascending scale, at least in the Western world.

    If a natural 4th is sounded by leap on a major chord (maj7, 6, maj9 etc) it will sound like a clam, unless you resolve it by a half step downwards to 3 (and, of course, you have completely heard it before you played it of course) - this is the way a classical musician, or a bebop improviser would use it. We would call this an appogiatura - a leaning note. Nothing unusual about that.

    The melody to Chi-Chi was a good example of an accented 4th use in this way. The melody of Stella by Starlight has some nice examples. They both resolve in the expected way 4-->3. In Kodaly it is represented by a downward pointing thumb, perhaps for this reason.


    I was listening to a very humorous piece on the radio by Meredith Monk the other day, that was very simple diatonic major harmony but the melody kept hitting an unresolved 4th by leap which just sounded rank in a funny kind of way. It was like deliberately bad composition. I wish I could track it down.

    The 4 + a major triad would be a natural choice for one of Jordan's quadrads. Come to think of it, that would be an excellent way to master the use of the note for a student.

    As far as bebop (Barry's thing) goes I have yet to hear a #4 used over a I major function chord (of course there are many examples over dominant chords.)
    Last edited by christianm77; 11-05-2016 at 08:50 PM.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by docdosco View Post
    Ha! I am not quite a neophyte. However I am always open to new things.

    Did I mention I used to play a live duo with Joe Albany in the 80's? He was Charlie Parker's piano player in the LA years. Therefore through a process of osmosis and hanging out......and no particular skill on my part, I absorbed second hand, twice removed, 30 years later, bebop from the source .... yuk yuk
    I'd still recommend giving it a go if it is new to you. Writing this is making me realise I should get back into it.

    Did Joe talk much about the nuts and bolts, or was he more of a 'learn by playing and listening' guy?

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by docdosco View Post
    mixolydian is a dominant scale that adds the b7 and maj 7th

    dorian adds the b3 and maj3

    major bebop is the 4 and b5
    This is not the way Barry formulates it, ihe never talks about bebop scales... More of a David Baker/Mark Levine thing. Isn't major bebop 5 and #5 normally?

    The Barry approach kind of has right and wrong - or more like established systems for doing things. I actually think there's a lot to be said for that. It doesn't mean it's a reflection of all music (although I find it reflects actual bebop very well.)

    In any case it's quite nice because I can just say 'that's the school as I understand it.' Someone can correct me if I've misunderstood something, but if I've got it right, that's a really straight up thing to be able to say.

    In terms of my own actual playing, I have accumulated layers of things I've practiced over the years.
    Last edited by christianm77; 11-05-2016 at 09:04 PM.

  28. #27

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    Great tune!

    In Ab...

    Ab to C to Eb to G to E.

    Then back to Ab.
    Last edited by Drumbler; 11-05-2016 at 09:05 PM.

  29. #28

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    Yes, but we were talking about the natural 4 and raised 4 over the IV chord. The raised 5th (lydian concept) is not a bebop thing. It seemed to occur in the cool jazz period and mostly on the tonic (I guess, although there are harmonic changes like the diatonic chords on the 7 steps of a major scale that occur with that pesky raised 4th).

    The major 4th is the 7th in a dominant 7th chord, and it of course resolves down a half step to resolve. That is pretty obvious, however using the raised 4th is a tricky deal in when and where to stick it. I love it in a dominant chord... 7b5 or 7#11 if one prefers. Very tasty.
    Last edited by docdosco; 11-05-2016 at 09:07 PM.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I'd still recommend giving it a go if it is new to you. Writing this is making me realise I should get back into it.

    Did Joe talk much about the nuts and bolts, or was he more of a 'learn by playing and listening' guy?

    Joe got high most the time. He did a long stretch for drugs. He and Warren Marsh (Art Pepper too) were the guys that really got nailed for long prison terms behind drugs. Joe was messed up. He didn't talk about much except where to score.

    I played with Jim Gordon too. That was before he killed his wife's mother with a hammer and then sent his wife a bereavement card.

    Boy, I had some spicy bandmates....

  31. #30

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    Oh, and I played the memorial for Frank Rosolino after the shot his 2 sons and then himself. He wasn't around to enjoy the performance unfortunately.

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by docdosco View Post
    Yes, but we were talking about the natural 4 and raised 4 over the IV chord. The raised 5th (lydian concept) is not a bebop thing. It seemed to occur in the cool jazz period and mostly on the tonic (I guess, although there are harmonic changes like the diatonic chords on the 7 steps of a major scale that occur with that pesky raised 4th).
    Sorry duh - yes I think I've just understood your last post. Yes. It may help to think that way. But however you construct this scale on those different roots with the added it still outlines a dominant seventh chord, so in this sense it is always a dominant scale.

    Here's a fourth example - Locrian with a natural 5th.

    Personally, I would tend to frame this as - starting a dominant scale on the different chord tones, and adding an extra note as required to make the thing work. Really it doesn't matter what that added note is. Here is a variation with no chromatics.

    1 6 b7 6 5 4 3 2 1

    You could even use an open string or a ghost note. Say we are in C, we can play the second note as an open G or something and then play Bb. It all works. The point is, of course, the rhythm.

    The major 4th is the 7th in a dominant 7th chord, and it of course resolves down a half step to resolve. That is pretty obvious, however using the raised 4th is a tricky deal in when and where to stick it. I love it in a dominant chord... b5. Very tasty.
    It's particularly, how you say, a la mode on things like II7, IV7 and bVII7. I don't actually like it over-emphasised on V7's.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by docdosco View Post
    Joe got high most the time. He did a long stretch for drugs. He and Warren Marsh (Art Pepper too) were the guys that really got nailed for long prison terms behind drugs. Joe was messed up. He didn't talk about much except where to score.

    I played with Jim Gordon too. That was before he killed his wife's mother with a hammer and then sent his wife a bereavement card.

    Boy, I had some spicy bandmates....
    I think I'd file that under 'experiential learning.' ;-)

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Sorry duh - yes I think I've just understood your last post. Yes. It may help to think that way. But however you construct this scale on those different roots with the added it still outlines a dominant seventh chord, so in this sense it is always a dominant scale.

    Here's a fourth example - Locrian with a natural 5th.

    Personally, I would tend to frame this as - starting a dominant scale on the different chord tones, and adding an extra note as required to make the thing work. Really it doesn't matter what that added note is. Here is a variation with no chromatics.

    1 6 b7 6 5 4 3 2 1

    You could even use an open string or a ghost note. Say we are in C, we can play the second note as an open G or something and then play Bb. It all works. The point is, of course, the rhythm.



    It's particularly, how you say, a la mode on things like II7, IV7 and bVII7. I don't actually like it over-emphasised on V7's.
    The way I really started to nail playing through changes was duo gigs I played with Sid Jacobs. (thank heaven for duos) I would get these supper club jobs and instead of calling a bass player, I'd call Sid. He was scary. It was like playing with Joe Pass.

    He slapped targeting 3rds and 7ths into my noodle. I was never really, really proficient playing changes until I began resolving my lines as I played and targeting 3rds and 7ths. (and b9 on a dominant) I had a Eureka moment with Sid. I became a player that played off the chord tones, targeting, using enclosures, chromatics and approach tones and such.... and playing melodically, with good phasing and letting the lines breath, from a player that noodled through scales.

    I was never a bebopper. I was happy just to play straight ahead well enough. Once I got these concepts under my belt, when I pulled Joe Pass or Barney Kessell or Wes Montgomery lines the underlying structure of jazz vocabulary (in this style) sunk in.

    Here is Sid playing All the things you are with Juampy Juarez. I can't play anything that sounds like this at these tempos. Slow it down somewhat and I'm cool though....



  35. #34

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    Here is another. Guide tones.


  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    (I know, nothing to it right? :-D)
    Now that the term BH school has been mentioned several times I have a small question. When you write dominant in your scale overview .. Is there a default BH scale?

    My own instinct is to play altered (so in case of Eb dominant, Id play the notes of the E melodic minor)

  37. #36

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    Dominant = mixolydian

    That's the simplest choice. It's not the only one of course.

  38. #37

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    It is the witching hour here 4 AM and I can't sleep, so I am engaged my Jazz Guitar Forumula night sleep therapy.

    Working on tunes is cool, Maybe working on other aspects of constructing solos and the trick, devices, approaches would be cool for chord melody, schools of imporov or comping too. I have grey areas I need to work on. Much is in the archive here I assume, but perhaps we might do a tune and trade choruses like found on a bandstand jam

    W could post a few of our sparkling solos and sling them out them for kudos or critisim

    Takers?

  39. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by fuzzthebee View Post
    If I understand your last sentence correctly, I think that's where this thread is headed. Some people put it out there right off the bat, while others work on getting a good performance/recording.
    Yeah that's the purpose of the practical standards threads.

    Anyway, Old dog/new tricks and all.... I'm a skimmer. Every time I see "PS", while scanning, I tend to think/see "PSA", if I'm not careful.

    Perhaps "P.Stan" or"p-shiz" for the abrev.? :-)

    .....kidding....

  40. #39

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    my contribution

    "you approach harmony in a unique way.Very original,and the more I listen to your posts,the more I appreciating it."
    Chris Whiteman,professor of jazz music,University of Miami

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I think I'd file that under 'experiential learning.' ;-)

    Yep.

    BTW, Jim Gordon is still in prison unable to get parole again until 2018. This has to be one of the saddest displays of a musician with mental issues ever. He played with so many great artists, and still has a sizable income just from the royalties from writing Layla etc. I guess he gives away a lot of money to fellow inmates. But he still hears voices in his head.

    He was decent to me, that's all know.

  42. #41

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    I have to hook up a recorder this week..I bought a Zoom a while back and have never used it. Here is my kick in the pants.

    In the meantime, Jimmy Bruno has a cool cut of All the things you are.

    He is the Paganini of Guitar. He isn't loved by all because his technical prowess and virtuosity is otherworldly and in your face, but I dig him just fine. I guess some don't understand his style. He rocks to me though:




    Thoughts?

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by fuzzthebee View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by docdosco View Post
    ... but perhaps we might do a tune and trade choruses like found on a bandstand jam

    W[e] could post a few of our sparkling solos and sling them out them for kudos or critisim

    Takers?
    ... that's where this thread is headed. Some people put it out there right off the bat, while others work on getting a good performance/recording.
    Yes! The Practical Standards threads are about participants posting ***audio*** of their takes, performances, or interpretations of the chosen song-of-the-month.

    I know we love it, but, as Garson O'Toole said in 1918, "... writing about music is as illogical as singing about economics."

    [Later (1983?), Elvis Costello attributed to Martin Mull a similar analogy: "Talking about music is like dancing about architecture."]

    So, let's post some audio or video, gents! There are plenty of other posts dedicated to Barry Harris, CST vs. chord-tones, and other theoretical excursions, no?

  44. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by M-ster View Post
    Yes! The Practical Standards threads are about participants posting ***audio*** of their takes, performances, or interpretations of the chosen song-of-the-month.

    I know we love it, but, as Garson O'Toole said in 1918, "... writing about music is as illogical as singing about economics."

    [Later (1983?), Elvis Costello attributed to Martin Mull a similar analogy: "Talking about music is like dancing about architecture."]

    So, let's post some audio or video, gents! There are plenty of other posts dedicated to Barry Harris, CST vs. chord-tones, and other theoretical excursions, no?
    Thoughts on approach are welcome and appreciated IMO, especially from more knowledgeable participants. That's been common practice, especially the earliest ones.

    It probably shouldn't be a back and forth DEBATE though. I'd agree with you that there are better places for THAT.

  45. #44

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  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    Thoughts on approach are welcome and appreciated IMO, especially from more knowledgeable participants. That's been common practice, especially the earliest ones.

    It probably shouldn't be a back and forth DEBATE though. I'd agree with you that there are better places for THAT.
    True, sorry about that.

  47. #46

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    Short clip from a recent gig:


  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by unknownguitarplayer View Post
    Short clip from a recent gig:


    I like this. Very nice. I listened 4 or 5 times. (it is short though)

    The development of the short melodic motifs with the quick triplet phrasing is cool, and the melody skips to slightly unusual intervals (and do I hear 4ths?) I'll listen again because it is a well constructed and 'musical' solo. No wasted notes.

  49. #48

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    Thanks for the kind words, Doc. Much appreciated.

  50. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by unknownguitarplayer View Post
    Thanks for the kind words, Doc. Much appreciated.
    Reminds me of Joe Diorio. Same touch and attack on the lines, plus he loved intervallic shapes that were spread out and unusual......

  51. #50

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    One of the best solos over All The Things.....