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  1. #1

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    Hi all,

    I'm looking for an authoritative list of great jazz tunes written by jazz guitarists
    Wes, Metheny, Sco and Hall have all written tons of great stuff. I'm looking for other guitarist's contributions. Any help would be great

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    All time favorite is 4 on 6
    Twisted Blues
    west Coast Blues
    Air Mail Special
    anounman
    Swing 42
    Swing 39

    and MANY more!!!!!!

  4. #3

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    Solar/Sonny Chuck Wayne
    Down for Double F. Green
    Corner Pocket F. Green
    Bluesette T. Theilman
    The Good Life Sacha Distel
    Walk, Don't Run J. Smith
    Nuages
    Gypsy Queen Gabor Szabo
    Chitlins Con Carne K. Burrell
    Detour Ahead Herb Ellis (co-writer)

  5. #4

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    I like "Ellis In Wonderland" and "Pickly Wickley" by Herb Ellis. (Stuart mentioned "Detour Ahead" above.)

    Here's "Pickly," from Herb's album "Thank You, Charlie Christian."


  6. #5

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    Travels by Pat Metheny

    Mahoney's 11 Ohms by Tal Farlow (more for the title, I think)

    Welcome to a Prayer by Pat Martino

    All Across The City by Jim Hall

    Mi Cosa by Wes Montgomery (and Four On Six)

    Swedish Pastry by Barney Kessel

  7. #6

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    Jimmy Bruno: Like That, Maplewood Avenue

  8. #7

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    More by Jim Hall: Romain, Careful, Big Blues, Furnished Flats, Drop Shot, Down from Antigua

  9. #8

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    Swagger by Lage Lund

  10. #9

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    Jimmy Raney: Signal


  11. #10

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    I also dig "West Coast Blues" and "Nuages", but one not mentioned yet is by Billy Bean: "Billy's Beanery"

  12. #11

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    Kurt Rosenwinkel Next Step



    Rafal Sarnecki Three Old Men from the Land of Aran



    Gilad Hekselman This Just In



    Rotem Sivan For Emotional Use Only



    Rale Micic Serbology


  13. #12

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    Brooklyn sometimes by Kurt Rosenwinkel
    Ellenville by Ben Monder
    Summer Band Camp Mick Goodrick (goes through all 12 keys)
    Silence of a candle Ralph Towner
    Paramour John Abercrombie
    Echolalia Ben Monder
    Follow Your Heart John Mclauglin
    The Eagle and the Daffodil also by John McLaughlin

    Just a few of my favourites
    David

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Jimmy Raney: Signal

    Raney had quite a few including the above, and "Motion", "Lee", "Parker '51", "On The Rocks", "We'll Be Together", "Ovals", "Portzerbie", "Samba Teekens" and a piece for Strings and electric guitar called "Suite For Guitar Quintet" that is over twenty minutes long.
    Jim hall also wrote an extended piece for guitar and string quartet.

  15. #14

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  16. #15

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    I really like John Scofield's songs on his A Go-Go album like Chank, Green Tea, Boozer. Really fun to play.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    Raney had quite a few including the above, and "Motion", "Lee", "Parker '51", "On The Rocks", "We'll Be Together", "Ovals", "Portzerbie", "Samba Teekens" and a piece for Strings and electric guitar called "Suite For Guitar Quintet" that is over twenty minutes long.
    Jim hall also wrote an extended piece for guitar and string quartet.
    Surprisingly, I have to mention Raney's composition "Puby La Keg" . He recorded it with Red Norvo.

    On the same subject, I just wanted to offer some trivia in relation to a couple of Raney tune titles, Potrezebie is riffing on a running joke from Mad magazine, Potrzebie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    A "Parker 51" is a rare and collectible fountain pen. Apparently JR was sent one by Parker pens for honouring them with the name check in the song title. The story goes, Stan Getz claimed ownership of the pen, because he led the group that recorded the tune !.

    I also really like " A farewell To Alms" written by Tal Farlow,
    and "Motivation" by Billy Bean, ( it's a killer).

  18. #17

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    a while ago Someone here suggested the tune

    Jean De Fleur

    It was a great suggestion



    great tune to play, it's a lot of fun, and guitar friendly

  19. #18

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    Place du Tertre - Bireli Lagrene




    I'll Take Les - Sco




    Al Green Song - Sco




    Calvin's Key - Pat Metheny


  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by pubylakeg
    Surprisingly, I have to mention Raney's composition "Puby La Keg" . He recorded it with Red Norvo.

    On the same subject, I just wanted to offer some trivia in relation to a couple of Raney tune titles, Potrezebie is riffing on a running joke from Mad magazine, Potrzebie - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    A "Parker 51" is a rare and collectible fountain pen. Apparently JR was sent one by Parker pens for honouring them with the name check in the song title. The story goes, Stan Getz claimed ownership of the pen, because he led the group that recorded the tune !.

    I also really like " A farewell To Alms" written by Tal Farlow,
    and "Motivation" by Billy Bean, ( it's a killer).
    I thought that Raney wrote Parker '51 in tribute to his painter friend, Ray Parker. Raney was quite a painter himself.
    That doesn't surprise me about Getz; I read his bio- he was a real SOB.
    I wonder what Raney meant by Puby La Keg?
    Tal wrote some swinging tunes in the 50s- "Meteor", "And She Remembers Me" (anybody know the joke behind that one?), "Gibson Boy", "Tina", Rock,n Rye" and Telefunky".

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    I thought that Raney wrote Parker '51 in tribute to his painter friend, Ray Parker. Raney was quite a painter himself.
    That doesn't surprise me about Getz; I read his bio- he was a real SOB.
    I wonder what Raney meant by Puby La Keg?
    Tal wrote some swinging tunes in the 50s- "Meteor", "And She Remembers Me" (anybody know the joke behind that one?), "Gibson Boy", "Tina", Rock,n Rye" and Telefunky".
    Well, yeah, AFAIR, the pen story came from Jon Raney's ? blog , but whether JR's original intention was to honour Ray Parker, it's quite possible, crossed wires maybe ? As you'll know, he also wrote one titled "Elegy For Ray Parker" on his last record.

    As for Tal, I'll Remember April,... "And She Remembers Me".

  22. #21

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    Joe Pass didn't write many tunes but 'For Django' is a waltz with a great set of changes:


  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by pubylakeg
    Well, yeah, AFAIR, the pen story came from Jon Raney's ? blog , but whether JR's original intention was to honour Ray Parker, it's quite possible, crossed wires maybe ? As you'll know, he also wrote one titled "Elegy For Ray Parker" on his last record.

    As for Tal, I'll Remember April,... "And She Remembers Me".
    You got it!

  24. #23

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    Blues for Herb- Emily Remler
    Bright Size Life- Pat Metheny
    One Note Samba- A.C. Jobim
    Tango El Bongo- George VanEps (I think)
    Drop Shot- Jim Hall
    Meteor- Tal Farlow
    Manonash- Tuck Andress

  25. #24

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    [QUOTE=Jonathan Levin;502242]Blues for Herb- Emily Remler
    QUOTE]
    +1, there. I love Emily's playing and Herb's. I've got to learn that tune....

  26. #25

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    Bill Frisell’s ”Throughout” is beautiful. Here is a live duo version with Frisell and Jim Hall:


  27. #26

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    Not one of Abercrombie's better-known 'hits' but I play it all the time:


    Not one of Martino's better-known 'hits' but it's a flat-out burner to play:


    Jobim's "If You Never Come To Me" is utter perfection. The melody goes up by half steps. The chords go down by half steps. Why didn't I think of this? That would be because I'm not Jobim!


    @Mark Kleinhaut has composed many meaningful, memorable songs but this is my favorite:

  28. #27

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    Mike Stern, Larry Coryell, Bill Frisell, Steve Kahn, Charlie Hunter, are just a handfull of many prolific jazz composers that play guitar, too many great songs to list.....

  29. #28

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    "Jobim's "If You Never Come To Me" is utter perfection. The melody goes up by half steps. The chords go down by half steps. Why didn't I think of this? That would be because I'm not Jobim!"

    I've been playing this forever.
    I turned our old tenor player onto it when he was about 70, he loved it too. He passed 10 yrs ago, rip Donald

  30. #29

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  31. #30

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    West Coast Blues (Wes Montgomery)
    Bluesette (Toots Thielemans)
    Girl from Ipanema (Antonio Carlos Jobim)
    Zoot Alures (Frank Zappa)
    Better Days Ahead (Pat Metheney)
    Always And Forever (Pat Metheney)

  32. #31

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    Many of the original Bossa Nova hits were written by guitarists, noting, of course, that Jobim also played piano.

    Bim Bom by Joao Gilberto.
    Anything by Roberto Menescal, Joyce, and others.

    Chico Pinheiro's Tempestade has been covered a lot.
    Guinga's Di Menor has been covered a lot, among his other tunes.

    Toninho Horta and Dori Caymmi have written a lot of great tunes. Beijo Partido, Yarabella, Migration and others come to mind.
    Joao Bosco has a lot of tunes, Incompatabilidade De Genios comes to mind.

    There are many more.

    These are all great jazz tunes, worth checking out if you haven't been exposed to Brazilian Jazz.

  33. #32

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    John McLaughlin (entire Extrapolation album)

    John Stowell - "fun with fruit"

    Wes - "Twisted Blues"

    Grant - "Jean de Fleur", "Grant's Tune"

    Django "Swing 39"

  34. #33

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    Tiptoe through the Tulips

  35. #34

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    No mention of Ralph Towner here. This thread should be purged from the record

  36. #35

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    This song has been mentioned already. Herb Ellis composed it along with other members of The Soft Winds, the trio he was part of before joining Oscar Peterson and Ray Brown.

    Here are are a few different versions of it.








  37. #36

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    Ah Mr Rhodes you love that Pickly Wickly track, I remember banter about this a few years ago. It is my rock drummers favourite jazz tune.

    So much fun to play and sounds awesome on a 175, must be in its sweet spot. When the tone as you move from the wound to the unwound really pops and then the nice mellow return to the wound strings.

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCat
    West Coast Blues (Wes Montgomery)
    Bluesette (Toots Thielemans)
    Girl from Ipanema (Antonio Carlos Jobim)
    Zoot Alures (Frank Zappa)
    Better Days Ahead (Pat Metheney)
    Always And Forever (Pat Metheney)
    These are my favorite jazz tunes composed by a guitar player. My criteria is that the composition must not depend on guitar or vocals. These compositions have integrity and are "non-guitaristic", i.e it must be possible to perform the music without a guitar, even on solo piano.

    Most material written by guitar players are found in other genres, like R&B, Rock, Country and Pop. And most instrumental guitar music won't hold its own without some characteristic guitar riffs, bends, slides and squeels etc impossible to reproduce on other instruments. (The Zappa tune included in my list is an interesting exception. Even though the guitarpart is hard to reproduce, "Zoot Alures" have actually been performed by traditional symphonic orchestras. It's Jazz in my book, even though I don't think of Frank Zappa as a Jazz player.) Guitar players in general tend to focus on crafting guitar sounds and showing off playing skills rather than focusing on elements of composition. In fairness, the traditional audience (mostly other guitar players) would usually be more interested in guitar sounds and playing technique than the actual composition.

    Most pop songs that made it to the charts were written by a singer/song writer, strumming chords backing up vocals. The characteristic sound of the vocalist, the song technique and expression (including visual appearance), always got more attention than the actual composition. Most of those singer/song writers are hardly recognized as "guitar players" around here and most of those songs are not remembered for composition qualities (there are exceptions of course, Neil Rodgers comes to mind, but not Jazz, even though he's obviously firmly rooted in Jazz)

  39. #38

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    This may have been mentioned before but I was in the mood for some Dickie Betts, so here's a chance to hear it.


  40. #39

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    no Ralph yet

    :-(

    (no I'm not going to make any recommendations.)

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by TH
    Silence of a candle Ralph Towner
    Somebody must have missed post #12.....

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    Somebody must have missed post #12.....
    That never happened. Stop gaslighting me.

  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    That never happened. Stop gaslighting me.
    Post #12 has this:

    Silence of a candle Ralph Towner

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by jameslovestal
    post #12 has this:

    silence of a candle ralph towner
    lies!!!!