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  1. #1
    I’ve been listening to lots of Coltrane, Mingus, etc. I love the manic intensity of their pieces!

    I was wondering if anyone could recommend me any guitarists with that same feel and really intensity.

    I find most lead jazz guitarists as overly clean and polished, something I’ve never enjoyed much.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Tal Farlow, John McLaughlin ?

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by teeps
    Tal Farlow, John McLaughlin ?
    noooooooo

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Irish16hockey
    I’ve been listening to lots of Coltrane, Mingus, etc. I love the manic intensity of their pieces!

    I was wondering if anyone could recommend me any guitarists with that same feel and really intensity.

    I find most lead jazz guitarists as overly clean and polished, something I’ve never enjoyed much.
    Here is Dexter Gordon with Philip Catherine.


  6. #5

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    Wes, Joe Pass, Billy Bauer?

  7. #6

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    Hard bop? Wes, Grant Green, Early Benson...

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by teeps
    Tal Farlow, John McLaughlin ?
    lol

  9. #8

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    GRANT GREEN

    (also there was a guy called Wes something?)

  10. #9

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    Might not be what you had in mind but it flipping slaps


  11. #10

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    grant green
    wes montgomery
    eddie mcfadden
    roland prince
    vinnie corrao
    paul weeden
    rene thomas
    george benson
    jimmy ponder
    nathen page
    ted dunbar
    doug raney
    melvin sparks
    richie hart
    mark elf
    eric gale
    pete bernstein
    sonny greenwich
    ronald muldrow
    henry johnson
    quentin warren
    thornel schwartz
    phil upchurch
    howard roberts
    joe diorio
    ray crawford
    billy butler
    billy bean
    wim overgaauw
    pat martino
    rodney jones
    bobby broom
    grant green jr
    louis stewart
    helmut kagerer
    karl ratzer
    jim mullen
    clint strong

    and i missed probably just as many
    Last edited by djg; 04-02-2020 at 02:06 PM.

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    Been listening to this a lot lately


  13. #12

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    Kenny Burrell fit in the hard bop camp when he wanted to.


  14. #13

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    I still never have figured out exactly what "hard bop" is.

    Any trait-lists, definitions, etc. out there?

  15. #14

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    Hard bop is like bop but harder

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    I still never have figured out exactly what "hard bop" is.

    Any trait-lists, definitions, etc. out there?
    Horace Silver and Art Blakey were prime exponents.

    Wikipedia has a reasonable stab at describing it:
    Hard bop - Wikipedia
    Last edited by grahambop; 04-02-2020 at 03:07 PM.

  17. #16

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    Jimmy Bruno

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    I still never have figured out exactly what "hard bop" is.

    Any trait-lists, definitions, etc. out there?
    Grew out of bebop, not as much of an emphasis on speed (but can still burn) more blues/r&b inflected, somewhat simpler, singable heads, art blakey is probably involved. Almost anything on blue note from like 1957 to 1962-3.

    So you know, all the best music ever created

    The older guys I knew coming up just called it bop. "Bebop" was a very specific time and place to them. You can't play "bebop" anymore. It's over. But bop lives on. Or something.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    Hard bop? Wes, Grant Green, Early Benson...
    What is throwing me off is the comment of "overly clean and polished".

    Ok, "overly" can be interpreted many ways, but as for "clean and polish", I can't figure out how that relates to playing in a hard bop style.

    This is why I posted that Philip Catherine track with Dexter Gordon since Philip uses effects.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    Grew out of bebop, not as much of an emphasis on speed (but can still burn) more blues/r&b inflected, somewhat simpler, singable heads, art blakey is probably involved. Almost anything on blue note from like 1957 to 1962-3.
    Gospel influence too. Soul-jazz was an outgrowth of this.

    This Horace Silver tune is a good example---not as angular as bebop tended to be and there was an emphasis on playing solos one need not be a player to appreciate. ;o)


  21. #20

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    Early Pat Martino stuff can get quite intense:


  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Early Pat Martino stuff can get quite intense:

    Man, I love all the accents. He's playing HARD.

  23. #22

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    Most of what's been categorized as hard bop doesn't include a guitar player.

    I like to think of this as an opportunity...

  24. #23

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    One of the archetypal hard bop tracks is Moanin’ (by Bobby Timmons):


  25. #24

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    As already mentioned, Wes Montgomery could bop hard:


  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Early Pat Martino stuff can get quite intense:
    pat at 17