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  1. #1

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    Here's a chance to list out all the recordings of one of the most under-rated but extremely important sideman of jazz guitar lore. Barry Galbraith was a great teacher (my teachers had him as a teacher), an excellent sight reader, a sort after single line player on a lot of the modern jazz arrangements happening in the late 40s and 50s (more so), and a family man who kept to himself.

    So, care to join me in going through his discography. I strongly encourage youtube examples so people can hear everything this man has created on his guitars.

    Neatomic, I am looking at you to start us off, brotha!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    hey bud..wouldn't fail ya

    got this one from sgcim here

    good one


    Barry Galbraith-alabama_concerto-jpg

    cheers

    ps- lush bg intro

    Last edited by neatomic; 12-29-2015 at 10:21 PM. Reason: ps-

  4. #3

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    another good one..this bg's session

    from around the same time -1958




    cheers

    ps this cut -winter 58..benson brooks- summer 58

  5. #4

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    There isn't a lot on video and much of what's out there has Galbraith taking a backseat role as a superb accompanist. For instance, he features throughout the TV series "The Subject is Jazz" but most of the solos are taken by his onscreen partner, Mundell Lowe. Here's a clip from "After Hours", a proposed TV series that never got off the ground with BG soloing at 13'55":

    Last edited by PMB; 12-29-2015 at 11:15 PM.

  6. #5
    Those are both great. Hearing Cannonball with Barry G is a real treat, because Cannonball is my favorite alto player and Barry plays behind him like they were long lost friends.

    His own album as a leader I still have to get into.

    How about his stuff with Hal McKusick?




  7. #6

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    yeah, i get you..guitar and the wind more of an acquired taste

    mckusick i have to delve into more..i like that type of arranger/player horn ie giuffre, gil melle, hambro etc...love oliver nelson, though a bit more overtly rootsy

    cheers

  8. #7

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    One of Galbraith's finest moments, "Love is For the Very Young" from the film "The Bad and the Beautiful" along with my transcription:



    Barry Galbraith-liftvy1-jpgBarry Galbraith-liftvy2-jpgBarry Galbraith-liftvy3-jpg
    There's also a great duo version of this tune on "The John Lewis Piano" album that sounds something like a precursor to the Bill Evans/Jim Hall "Undercurrent" session:

    Last edited by PMB; 12-29-2015 at 11:16 PM.

  9. #8

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    that john lewis track is exquisite..two masters


    cheers

  10. #9

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    Here's another fave - love that low C tuning!


  11. #10

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    Jimmy Hamilton - Sweet But Hot (1954)
    http://www.amazon.com/Sweet-But-Hot-Jimmy-Hamilton/dp/B000005OEQ


    Hank Jones - The New York Rhythm Section (1956)
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005MH8VGQ?


    Marilyn Moore - Moody (1957)
    http://www.amazon.ca/Moody-Marilyn-Moore/dp/B00004UFX3

    Ruby Braff - Blowing Around The World (1959)
    http://www.discogs.com/Ruby-Braff-Bl...elease/3569629

    Freddie Cole - Waiter, Ask The Man To Play The Blues (1964)
    Freddy Cole - Waiter Ask the Man to Play the Blues - Amazon.com Music


    Galbraith was such a tasteful, inventive and supportive sideman. He really swung too!

  12. #11

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    Some personal favourites,
    I'm much obliged to forum member thegrandwazoo for recommending the Mckusick/Galbraith quartet studio album "East Coast Jazz 8" (same line-up as the "At The Academy" album).



    He's also on the Joe Puma album "East Coast Jazz 3"



    And not forgetting "The Tal Farlow Album". Farlow's first recording for the Verve label.


  13. #12

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    Let's not forget Sheila Jordan - Portrait of Sheila


  14. #13

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    BG was on most of George Russell's early records, because they couldn't find anyone else who could read and play his charts.
    The Russell LP that best shows off BG's playing is "The Jazz Workshop" album, with Bill Evans, Art Farmer and Hal McKusick.
    That was the recording that "Concerto For Billy the Kid" came from.
    On one tune, BG has to play a difficult ostinato that goes on for about a minute.

    Another record that has a lot of good blowing by BG is a record he made with Bobby Jaspar called "Clarinet Marmalade".
    Johnny Carisi wrote a big band feature for BG called "Barry's Tune" that's featured on the Gil Evans LP "Out Of the Cool"- a kind of modern day "Solo Flight".

    BG was supposed to be on the 'Birth of the Cool' album with Miles Davis and Gil Evans, but they decided to ditch the guitar for some reason.

  15. #14

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    I'm loving this thread. What a musician!

  16. #15
    destinytot Guest
    6
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    another good one..this bg's session

    from around the same time -1958




    cheers

    ps this cut -winter 58..benson brooks- summer 58
    I'm transported back to my teens by this sound. I love it - thank you for posting it!(Auld Lang Syne - and all that 'jazz'... Off to bury my nose into a deep pile of faded album covers!)

  17. #16
    destinytot Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by PMB
    Here's another fave - love that low C tuning!

    Great to hear BG using lowered tuning - thanks!
    Last edited by destinytot; 12-30-2015 at 07:27 AM.

  18. #17
    destinytot Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    I'm loving this thread. What a musician!
    +1 ¡Gracias, Irez!

  19. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by PMB
    One of Galbraith's finest moments, "Love is For the Very Young" from the film "The Bad and the Beautiful" along with my transcription:



    Barry Galbraith-liftvy1-jpgBarry Galbraith-liftvy2-jpgBarry Galbraith-liftvy3-jpg
    There's also a great duo version of this tune on "The John Lewis Piano" album that sounds something like a precursor to the Bill Evans/Jim Hall "Undercurrent" session:

    PMB, have you noticed that a lot of his recordings are out of tune. Not the musicians, but the record itself. Like the orginal record was spun too fast or too slow?

  20. #19
    This is a great one


    1957
    Kenny Burrell - Barry Galbraith Quartet
    Kenny Burrell, Barry Galbraith (guitar) Leonard Gaskin (bass) Bobby Donaldson (drums)
    Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, NJ, May 10, 1957
    1246Billie's BounceStatus ST 8318; Prestige PR 7448
    1247Prelude To A Kiss-
    1248It Don't Mean A Thing-
    1249unknown titlePrestige rejected
    * Status ST 8318 Various Artists - Guitar Soul
    * Prestige PR 7448 The Best Of Kenny Burrell

  21. #20

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    as trumpeted by sgcim..the very far out george russell


    check this...not only is bg playing almost contemporary classical (very outside) parts, but check his muted reverby tone.. at around the 4:10 mark ...very ahead of its time for 1956!!

    this track approaches moondog territory




    cheers

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    as trumpeted by sgcim..the very far out george russell


    check this...not only is bg playing almost contemporary classical (very outside) parts, but check his muted reverby tone.. at around the 4:10 mark ...very ahead of its time for 1956!!

    this track approaches moondog territory




    cheers

    You're traveling through another dimension, a dimension not only of sight and sound but of mind. A journey into a wondrous land whose boundaries are that of imagination. That's the signpost up ahead—your next stop, the Twilight Zone!

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    as trumpeted by sgcim..the very far out george russell


    check this...not only is bg playing almost contemporary classical (very outside) parts, but check his muted reverby tone.. at around the 4:10 mark ...very ahead of its time for 1956!!

    this track approaches moondog territory




    cheers
    I don't know why you chose that awful cut to post; it's the only cut I skip over on the CD I bought many years ago.
    Here's the real stuff from the LP:


    It's a shame that Russell disavowed and refused to grant performance rights to all of his pre-Lydian Chromatic Concept music.
    He was writing great stuff like this and then he got obsessed with the LCC, and wrote music that lacked the drive, excitement, harmonic richness and swing of his pre-LCC music, IMHO.

    Imagine playing Barry's chair in a group like this.
    I remember reading in a Martin Williams book (Jazz Masters in Transition) that Barry was out of town one week, and they got Jim Hall to take his place in a concert with music like this, with Gunther Schuller conducting.

    They got a few bars into the piece, and Gunther Schuller stopped the band and asked Jim Hall what was the matter.
    Schuller then said, "Oh, I didn't know you can't read music like this." He then asked someone, "Where is Barry?"

    They told him BG would be out of town for the concert, so they let Hall take the piece home and woodshed it, and Hall did a great job at the concert.

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    I don't know why you chose that awful cut to post; it's the only cut I skip over on the CD I bought many years ago.
    Here's the real stuff from the LP:

    happy new year to you too!! hahaha

    cheers

    ps - btw, i posted it cause it was bg in an unusual setting and with an unusual tone for him

    pss- i'd imagine you don't care much for moondog either!! hah
    Last edited by neatomic; 01-01-2016 at 07:02 PM. Reason: pss-

  25. #24

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    I still love "Bird's Lament". My brother-in-law used to see him on the street every day, dressed up like a viking!

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Irez87
    PMB, have you noticed that a lot of his recordings are out of tune. Not the musicians, but the record itself. Like the orginal record was spun too fast or too slow?
    Not just BG recordings. So many recordings before the digital age aren't at concert pitch (and not just those such as Barry's solo posted above without a fixed reference point from a keyboard). Sometimes tapes ran at the wrong speed. The original Kind of Blue LP and CD releases famously suffered from that problem. Occasionally, as with certain Beatles tunes, it was done consciously for effect. Incidentally, there's an ongoing debate about whether Robert Johnson's recordings were radically sped up. The slower, transposed versions posted on Youtube exhibit none of the usual artefacts that are a byproduct of that process. In fact, both his voice and guitar sound to me much more natural and closer to those of his contemporaries.

  27. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by PMB
    Not just BG recordings. So many recordings before the digital age aren't at concert pitch (and not just those such as Barry's solo posted above without a fixed reference point from a keyboard). Sometimes tapes ran at the wrong speed. The original Kind of Blue LP and CD releases famously suffered from that problem. Occasionally, as with certain Beatles tunes, it was done consciously for effect. Incidentally, there's an ongoing debate about whether Robert Johnson's recordings were radically sped up. The slower, transposed versions posted on Youtube exhibit none of the usual artefacts that are a byproduct of that process. In fact, both his voice and guitar sound to me much more natural and closer to those of his contemporaries.
    That's why I shy away from those recordings, they are very hard to transcribe for me. There's some great early Clark Terry albums that I want to get, but I shy away from them for that reason as well. I listen to jazz for pleasure and as a means of inspiration. However, my inner ear is getting to the point where I can correct the pitch on my guitar without retunning the damn thing...

  28. #27

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    you fellows need to get up 1970's standards!! haha..had technics pitch adjust direct drive turntables then..and pitch adjust cd players since ..if you're all digital..grab audacity and do some shifting...no way to play along with everything without...i learned that very early on...

    problems can come from poor instrument tuning to begin with, poor recording speed, poor mastering and poor transfers..way too many variables..easy fix with pitch adjust units

    if you like to play along to recordings, shouldn't be without


    cheers

    ps- forget playing to youtube...no standards at all

  29. #28

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    BG solos a bit on this around 3:38


  30. #29
    I love Barry Galbraith, but this thread made me love his playing even more.

    I just ordered the last two books to complete his series of Jazz Guitar Studies. My teachers studied with him, and that must have been a hoot and a holler! His Comping book set the bedrock from which I learned to comp melodically. His Bach book got me into classical music with a plectrum. That Melodic and Harmonic Minor book is a headache of long lines, but each phrase offers a masterclass in linear construction in it of it's self.

    Barry was the teacher's teacher and what a player!

  31. #30

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    funny, his posture doesn't look bad in that vid (his head is kinda cocked at a weird angle tho) - he suffered from the '60's on with numbness in his hands as the result of bad posture and nerves impinging on bone spurs in his spine (i got this from the bio in the Mel Bay book).

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcee
    BG solos a bit on this around 3:38

    Actually, that was Mundell Lowe on the solo at about 3:38.

    BG only played on the George Russell compositions, and the tune at the end when both ML and BG played together.

    BG held his guitar on his left leg, CG style, while ML held it on his right leg.

    I heard BG's physical problems stemmed from a fall he took while he was working on his roof.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    Actually, that was Mundell Lowe on the solo at about 3:38.

    BG only played on the George Russell compositions, and the tune at the end when both ML and BG played together.

    BG held his guitar on his left leg, CG style, while ML held it on his right leg.

    I heard BG's physical problems stemmed from a fall he took while he was working on his roof.
    Thanks for the correction. I remember him and Mundell Lowe playing together from that same session but I couldn't find it on YT.

  34. #33

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    Here's a rare interview with Barry Galbraith that was published as a part of a series on rhythm guitar in Metronome magazine, 1958. Turk Van Lake is the interviewer (the rest of the series can be found at the freddiegreen.org site):

    Q. Who were your main influences?
    A. Freddie Green and George Van Eps.
    Q. How did you achieve your style?
    A. Playing with Basie records helped a great deal.
    Q. Does rhythm guitar help in other fields of guitar playing?
    A. All aspects of an instrument must be studied. Gaps [in technique] are being bridged by newcomers. It is the evolution of playing that the new generation absorbs [the techniques] of the previous [generation], so that newcomers should not have any trouble playing both rhythm guitar and electric guitar. You should be a complete player of an instrument that has so many facets.
    Q. What gauge strings do you use?
    A. Heavy gauge.
    Q. What is the string action height?
    A. The height of the action depends on each instance, on each type of performance.
    Q. What type of pick do you use?
    A. A hard pick about one inch long and 3/4 inch wide.
    Q. Do you recommend any special set of chords for rhythm playing?
    A. For jump tunes, use chords on the inside strings and use no more than three strings. For ballads, use chords on the inside strings and use no more than four strings.
    Q. What is your approach to blending in the rhythm section?
    A. I think of the guitar as the top part of the bass.
    Q. What is your advice to young guitarists on playing rhythm?
    A. Rhythm guitar is one of the fundamentals of guitar playing and performs an important function in the band. It should not be considered unimportant. Pupils of mine who played good electric guitar, but never played rhythm, have found tremendous satisfaction in playing rhythm and have a new respect for it.

  35. #34

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    have to reiterate how great this recording truly is


    a must!!



    cheers

  36. #35

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    old thread - doesn't matter - he's still as important as ever - the great BG mystery remains unsolved - WHAT DO THE CIRCLED NUMBERS MEAN ABOVE THE STAVE IN HIS COMPING BOOK????

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Groyniad
    old thread - doesn't matter - he's still as important as ever - the great BG mystery remains unsolved - WHAT DO THE CIRCLED NUMBERS MEAN ABOVE THE STAVE IN HIS COMPING BOOK????
    Haven’t looked at that book for a while, but from memory I believe it means the string number for the top note of the chord. So it’s like classical guitar notation effectively.

  38. #37

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    great - i was thinking it was position numbers (fret numbers) - i'll check this out and get backthanks

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Groyniad
    old thread - doesn't matter - he's still as important as ever - the great BG mystery remains unsolved - WHAT DO THE CIRCLED NUMBERS MEAN ABOVE THE STAVE IN HIS COMPING BOOK????
    String numbers, but they're not always notated correctly in the book. They're sometimes confused with fret positions - as I found to my cost. But the book is taken (I believe) from his handwritten work. Whether that was precise is another thing too.

    In places, it's all a bit unreliable really. Best for the player to use his judgement and play what sounds and feels right.