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  1. #1

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    I grew up and learned to play listening to Ventures, Lonnie Mack, Duane Eddy, Link Wray, and the original first generation surf stuff in the early/mid sixties. There was also Los Indios Tabajaras (sp), Herb Alpert, Chet, and others doing nice instrumental pop stuff - even Tony Mottola's pop albums. Whatever happened to this genre? I still like to hear/play it and some folks seem to like to listen to it. I do Apache, The Breeze and I, Walk Don't Run, Sleepwalk, plus some Shadows stuff on a regular basis and it brings back memories for some. I don't understand why this music is so out of favor.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Ellis
    I grew up and learned to play listening to Ventures, Lonnie Mack, Duane Eddy, Link Wray, and the original first generation surf stuff in the early/mid sixties. There was also Los Indios Tabajaras (sp), Herb Alpert, Chet, and others doing nice instrumental pop stuff - even Tony Mottola's pop albums. Whatever happened to this genre? I still like to hear/play it and some folks seem to like to listen to it. I do Apache, The Breeze and I, Walk Don't Run, Sleepwalk, plus some Shadows stuff on a regular basis and it brings back memories for some. I don't understand why this music is so out of favor.
    Not flashy enough is my guess...

    It sounds quite old fashioned to the young folks although a lot of it is quite challenging to beginner/intermediate guitar players.
    I taught "Rumble" to a couple of teenagers and there's a lot in there for beginners: triplets, inserted 2/4 measures and such - stuff you'll be able to use further on down the road.

  4. #3

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    Hi Skip,

    I think it's only out of favor because younger guitarists don't even know it exists.

    I have a feeling that if they heard Lonnie Mack's version of Memphis, or The Surfaris playing Wipeout, or The Ventures playing Walk Don't Run, or Dick Dale's version of Misirlou they would think it was some very cool sounding guitar music.

    It's hard to be excited about or interested in something that you've never heard!

  5. #4

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    Now that's tone. Extremely irritating, annoying tone, but tone nevertheless. I couldn't listen to all of it.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    Now that's tone. Extremely irritating, annoying tone, but tone nevertheless. I couldn't listen to all of it.
    Same here, so it's not just me.
    Made me think to early Joe Satriani, in worse.

    Listening to Brecker Brothers right now, if this can inspire some of you ...

  7. #6

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    Quentin Tarantino movie soundtracks are filled with instrumental pop rock and it's much more a part of pop culture and a musical influence than some are led to believe.


  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by djg
    just out:

    High production-quality garbage IMO. It has all of the components of a good recording except music.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by strumcat
    High production-quality garbage IMO. It has all of the components of a good recording except music.
    My sentiments, too. I'm very traditional (probably too much so) and I couldn't get past the first 30 seconds.

  10. #9

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    Godspeed You! Black Emperor:



    Not quite in the lineage of Herb Alpert and the Tijuana Brass, but worth a listen. Guitars aplenty.

    Also worth investigating is the style of progressive metal called Djent, especially Animals as Leaders, with their guitar on a stand:


  11. #10

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    Dick Dale btw was very popular with the hip young crowd of today. If you listen to some latest work by Bill Frisell, or Julian Lage, that twangy American 60s sound is the direction they're going too.

    My fav these days is this band Khruanghbin. The best music I've heard in a while in any genre.


  12. #11

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  13. #12

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    "Ain't That Just Like A Woman" was a hit for Louis Jordan. BB King did a lot of Louis Jordan tunes but on this one, he left off the lyric. Still works....


  14. #13

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  15. #14

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  16. #15

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    This came later than most of the rock instrumentals mentioned here but it's a helluva performance of a great tune.


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  18. #17

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    A jazzy blues gem (by Ray Bryant, IIRC) here given quite an electric workout.


  19. #18

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    This was a gigantic hit back in '73.


  20. #19

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  21. #20

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    Always liked this one


  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    This was a gigantic hit back in '73.

    funny, that's what I was going to post. It was a major reason I took up the drums around 5th or 6th grade

  23. #22

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    Another early '70s instrumental that was a huge hit.


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  25. #24

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  26. #25

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    It fell out of favor because it was pop music--either instrumental versions of vocal tunes or tunes written in the style of the day... and pop music changes with the times.

    Can you imagine an instrumental version of today's pop music?