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  1. Guitar Perfect Jazz guitar?

    In your opinion, what would you describe as the best all around jazz guitar, either currently produced or out-of-production, and what makes it so amazing.

    just for fun

    Thunder

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  3. #2
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    Guitar

    its odd, i can't get a picture of my doublecut, but its pretty close to this

    for a cheap (relatively, not for students *sigh*) guitar this is better than and other semi-hollowbody i've tried. Reeeeeaally personal tone, and sounds at least perfect through any amp at all, usually more than perfect though. Mine also has a kind of inherited history, transfered from a strat i had to trade in which my dad had for years...
    If you want a guitar, buy this, no matter what, or at least try it out, and if you dont like it, get the shop to put some proper strings on it (originally i tried mine with 9's, until we asked and they were fine) and its almost a guarantee. Before trying mine, i sampled a benedetto, another dangelico (a new yorker) and a 70's Gibson, however this came out smelling of roses. I have heard theres some dodgy ones out there though, so presumably like fenders and gibsons theres some lacking, but yeah, go for it

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    but what is it

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    oh yeah! sorry its a D'Angelico EXDC

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    thanks, where did you get yours from?
    steve

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    thanks once again, yea, kinda near England, I'm in Wales

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    I have never tried one before but from the reviews on MusiciansFriend, Epiphone Elitists seem to be a good bet. Very expensive but all the reviews have been great for all of their guitars.
    Last edited by aPAULo; 04-14-2007 at 06:01 PM.

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    not tried any epiphones, but personally for their prices I'd prefer to go with either a high end Ibanez or a Fender '72 hollow tele (always been really tempted by those hehe). I think they are about the same price as some Gibsons as well anyway?

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    Same with me actually. I always wanted to get a semi hollow fender tele. And actually I think I will make an Ibanez Artcore my next guitar probably.

    Is the question what is the best jazz guitar period or what is the best jazz guitar for the money?

  11. #10
    not sure there can be a definitive answer to a question like this, but for solidbodies, it's hard to beat a tele. i have two and i'm always eyeballing a third...

  12. the question was actially directed at both aspects, sorery i didn't make that clear

    Thunder

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    It's interesting to see that people favor the Tele as a jazz guitar...just didn't think of a Tele that way. That might seem weird, but you know...

    I'd think, without having played either of them, that a big old Gibson ES-175 or 335 would do the trick really well. But for the money, I'd probably go for an Epi Sheraton II - I hear they're relatively inexpensive.

  14. #13
    I was in a local Guitar Center store looking at a Les Paul. When the salesman asked what I'd be playing with it, I said jazz and some blues. the salesman then asked, "who plays jazz on a Les Paul." I replied, "Well, Les Paul for one."

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    Quote Originally Posted by california View Post
    I was in a local Guitar Center store looking at a Les Paul. When the salesman asked what I'd be playing with it, I said jazz and some blues. the salesman then asked, "who plays jazz on a Les Paul." I replied, "Well, Les Paul for one."
    hahaha That's actually really funny

  16. #15
    Here's a cell phone picture of Les last month at his regular Monday night gig at Iridium in New York, not bad for 91 years old!


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    Quote Originally Posted by california View Post
    Here's a cell phone picture of Les last month at his regular Monday night gig at Iridium in New York, not bad for 91 years old!
    I can't wait to go see him - I'm headed there at the end of the month / beginning of May.

    So excited!

  18. #17

    Guitar The Perfect Jazz Guitar

    As an add-on to the question for the best or perfect jazz guitar. I did not hear too much about specific makes and models. I want to purchase a good electric jazz guitar. Initially I had my heart set on the Gibson ES-175 reissue (as you can tell from my username...that's all I could think of when joining this forum). Anyway, a couple of questions...what would be a good electric jazz guitar to purchase? How is the Gibson ES-175 or the L-5 or Super 400? How about Stromberg or a D'Angelico? I heard those two were now coming out of Korea or Japan and that the production was not great. Others that I have read about are Eastman, PRS, Triggs and Ibanez. I have only played the Gibson ES-175 at a music store. The other interesting finding when shopping for a jazz guitar is that there are many independent luthiers that supposedly make fantastic hand-crafted guitars. I am totally at a loss which direction to go. This purchase will be for a guitar that I will keep forever.

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    Don't just cast off non-American guitars my friend, my D'angelico i chose over a number of USA guitars, and not once did i play an american strat nicer than my old japanese one. Once you're paying over £600 for a guitar you need to try out each seperately (at an audition i was chatting to a guitarist who bought a new gibson ES333 and it snapped at the neck inside the case, so he wont lean guitars upright anymore!) rather than rely on reputation; Ibanez another good case.

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    Newbie!

    Quote Originally Posted by california View Post
    I was in a local Guitar Center store looking at a Les Paul. When the salesman asked what I'd be playing with it, I said jazz and some blues. the salesman then asked, "who plays jazz on a Les Paul." I replied, "Well, Les Paul for one."
    That's hilarious !!! I will repeat that one !!

  21. #20
    Supposedly best bang for your buck in the archtop selection are Eastman guitars. Check them out.

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    Telecasters!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    not sure there can be a definitive answer to a question like this, but for solidbodies, it's hard to beat a tele. i have two and i'm always eyeballing a third...
    Mr. Beaumont, I couldn't agree more. The telecaster is just it for me as well. I will have a 7-string tele made for me some day. If it isn't exactly a tele, then I will feel like one.

    I love archtops, I dreamed of owning archtops for years, but when I finally got a couple of great ones they were so much hassle. My first good one was a guitar called a Harptone (this guitar was suppossedly designed and built by Koontz which is what Pat Martino used to play years ago). The Harptone was like a slightly smaller ES-175 but with solid woods. The Guild Artist Award I had was a gift from a friend and it was mind blowing, but a pain to gig with. Feeback, finicky, feedback, finicky.

    Then I got a tele, and the rest is history. With the single coil pickups, or some custom humbuckers, you can just nail a sound for any style. No rock band was too racous and no big band was too loud. The tele never gave me a minutes trouble.

  23. #22
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    Tele for Jazz

    Quote Originally Posted by fret15 View Post
    It's interesting to see that people favor the Tele as a jazz guitar...just didn't think of a Tele that way. That might seem weird, but you know...

    I'd think, without having played either of them, that a big old Gibson ES-175 or 335 would do the trick really well. But for the money, I'd probably go for an Epi Sheraton II - I hear they're relatively inexpensive.
    It was odd to me as well. I have owned two very fine archtops, and a couple of OK archtops but the tele (and other solid bodies ) has a lot of advantages for a working musician.

    1. The tele is a slab of wood with strings on it<g>. If you do travel with your guitar you can easily replace a broken one and you have a great pallet to try out different pickups, etc. I don't know anyone who wants to start carving holes on that big dollar archtop. I heard of a guy who's tele got smashed and he swapped out the electronics from his destroyed tele with the brand new one he had to buy in his hotel room in one night.
    2. Less temperature and humidity effects.
    3. Let's face it, most people play very loud so what you (and your audience) are ultimately hearing is the sound from your speaker...which is made out of paper. Once you get above a certain volume that beautiful archtop acoustic tone is gone anyway.
    4. Guitars like Gibson 335s, Gretschs, ES-175 are sometimes so highly regarded for jazz because they are more like soliid bodies (IMHO). Think about it. You take an ES-175 / it has a laminate top that is stiffer (like a solid body), usually a tunematic bridge (further isolation from the "wood" of the guitar), and you have cut holes in the top to place the pickups (again...dampens the tops ability to vibrate). What I am saying is that many of those guitars are great because they are really behaving more like solid body guitars with all of the modifications.
    5. You can turn up the tele on that loud rock or country gig. I really enjoyed having one guitar to play jazz trio for a reception, then a nice clean tone for dinner music and then crank it up for a rock and country music set.
    I love the way an archtop guitar feels and it is just a part of our tradition, but when you get above the acoustic volume of the instrument the majority of your sound comes from the electronics. I was glad to get rid of archtops and remove so many problems from my working life.

    How the wood effects the amplified tone is a great idea for a new thread!

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    Guitar

    Do your consider my G&L ASAT CLASSIC HOLLOW BODY a Tele. It is fine for Jazz.
    If you don't consider Teles like jazz guitars you must listen to Bill Frisell tunes.

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    What an inspiration!

    Quote Originally Posted by california View Post
    Here's a cell phone picture of Les last month at his regular Monday night gig at Iridium in New York, not bad for 91 years old!

    At 85, this gives me a lot of hope! Who is this guy and where can I hear him play?

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    Sweet Feeling a bit stupid! Age has it's blessings (and short comings!)

    Quote Originally Posted by california View Post
    Here's a cell phone picture of Les last month at his regular Monday night gig at Iridium in New York, not bad for 91 years old!
    Gads! I reread the thread. Is this reaLLY
    I reread the thread. Is this really Les Paul? I live in California and will surely check out the web to see if he is coming my way! Good tip, that would really make my day!

  27. #26
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    G&L a Tele?

    Quote Originally Posted by priscilo View Post
    Do your consider my G&L ASAT CLASSIC HOLLOW BODY a Tele. It is fine for Jazz.
    If you don't consider Teles like jazz guitars you must listen to Bill Frisell tunes.
    My "Tele" is actually a custom made hollow body tele (no f holes) made by Eric Miller, so it is actually not a Fender Telecaster. I should have changed my "tele" comments to "solid body" comments. The reason my "tele" was hollowed out was to make it lighter and also introduce a little "breadth" to the sound. I think a thread on the physics of guitars would be cool. I gave this guitar to my son and I now play a Carvin 7-string.

    I love the look, craftsmenship and the whole "tradition" of arch-tops, but for me they are not good tools. I have heard too many players who get incredible sound from a solid body without the problems associated with arch tops.

    However, I will admit, when you are listening to someone playing an archtop where the acoustic and electric volumes are mixed it can be incredible. My guitar sounds wonderful at lower volumes, but it doesn't have that mix of acoustic and electric that an archtop has.

    -Butch

  28. #27
    I don't think it is possible to have a perfect jazz guitar, and here's why.

    Initially, let me say that I am referring to electric guitars.

    There are multiple forms of jazz as of today, each of which may require different sounds. Sometimes distortion is used, and often it is not. Distortion alone pretty much rules out most hollow bodied guitars due to the really unpleasant sound that gets generated at louder volumes with distortion.

    Amplifiers. They are so good these days, that you can take a horrible guitar and make it sound alright. This also means that between amplifiers, and equalizers you can use a solid or hollow body and be able to make a nice sound which ultimately suits you.

    Wood can make a difference as well, but I think it's importance is often overstated, mainly because of the technological advances that have been made in our lifetime. Example - Ovation guitars, with the rounded plastic back sound great. In my opinion the only important part wood plays in electric guitars is the fretboard, I think ebony fretboards play much nicer than rosewood - I don't think sound is altered much if at all by this though (no clue really).

    With all that said, the rest comes down to how a guitar feels in the players hands and if it has a sound that suits them.

    I have been doing a lot of research lately because in the next couple months I will be in the market for a jazz guitar in the ($1000-3000) price range. I have found arguments for all sorts of things, but one of them made a big impact on me. A store owner (I wish I could remember the link) placed a long diatribe about Heritage guitars, and how their quality and service has dropped, and as a result he no longer carries them. Also in this letter he stated that the really expensive (over $3000) Gibson guitars are incredibly overpriced, and that they are a rip off. He made a few examples of their $5-10,000 guitars, and stated how that the actual cost was (ex) $800. I believe this.

    What's my point? People may equate cost with quality, which also means people also pay for brand names because they believe they are better. In many cases brand name guitars are better, but at what price does the value no longer provide a better guitar?

    There are many independent guitar companies that make excellent guitars, yet I suspect many people shy away from them because they lack a brand name. Those guitars, are also probably better in some cases (and less expensive) than their brand-named counterpart.

    I think it would be fun to take all the different jazz guitars of all price ranges, and have a panel of people judge them on sound while plugged into a standard amplifier. I would bet that the $300 Ibanez may just be as good sounding and feeling as that $10,000 diamond encrusted Gibson.

    Regardless, I love the Gibson ES-137, and intend to get one, but I'll bet it's not even close to the best sounding jazz guitar out there; but I like it, and when everything is all said and done -- isn't that all that matters?

  29. #28
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    Ted Greene (deceased), Ed Bickert, and Mike Stern also make their livings off of teles or tele like guitars.

    I really like the G&L Blues Boy, which is a semihollow with humbucker in the neck. Makes a very nice jazz guitar.

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    I know that I am like *months* behind on this convo, but since I am new hear, I wont feel bad about resurecting this thread. I think that the Hofner New President is the Cadilac of newer made archtops.

    Although i will agree, that tele's take the cake as far as solid body guitars for jazz playing are concerned.

  31. #30
    I play on a jap. 1996 stratocaster with 0.13 flatwounds. Very nice
    It´s what you play on it that makes the difference IMHO...

  32. #31
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    I don't know, but I bought a telecaster. I think it's a nice guitar. I notice many people here own a telecaster too. I'm happy with mine.

  33. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Chrizzia View Post
    I play on a jap. 1996 stratocaster with 0.13 flatwounds. Very nice
    It´s what you play on it that makes the difference IMHO...
    Wow...those are big strings for a strat, it must really change the character of the guitar. I've often mused over getting a tele and beefing up the string for a rounder tone but I don't have the courage to do it. Did you need to change the setup much?

  34. #33
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    SRV played .13s on all his strats, though rounds not flats. The rule is pretty much, if you go up or down more than one size in strings, you will need to reset intonation and maybe nut slot adjustment.

    If moving only 1 gauge, if anything is needed, usually just a tweak of the truss rod.

  35. #34
    depends on the guitar...i use .11's on my teles, which isn't all that heavy, but i use a wound G which they're usually not setup for.

    On my american tele (which has a bit of a thinner neck) i had to do a little tweaking after moving up the string gauge (before i started using flats i was using .10 gauge roundwounds) but the nut was fine, the space for the G string was fine to accomodate the wound string.

    on my two MIM tles (which ship with .09's, i believe) i did have to do a little nut work, but those big fat necks didn't budge.

    good 'ol SRV used .13's on his strat, but they were roundwound with an unwound G, and he also tuned down a half step. he definitely had a distinctive tone (not a fan really, but that tone's been copied quite a bit-- so somebody digs it) on the jazz side, ted greene used .12's, i believe, and got some absolutely gorgeous jazz tones out of his teles.

    there used to be a cable acess show here in chicago, back when i was in high school, led by a cool sax player whose name escapes me...his son was on guitar, and he played a green strat that appeared to be strung up with flatwounds (could kinda tell, in the tight shots) he always sounded great. show was called the (blank blank) jazz show...

    my buddy and i used to watch that show every afternoon...dang, what was that cat's name?...

  36. #35
    I had to change the setup quite a bit, but it works great...
    0.12´s can do the job without a doubt.
    I think that most decent guitars can be used in jazz music. It really depends on the player.
    I would reallu like an archtop, but I have not decided which one yet...So untill I know, my Strat will be the main man...

  37. #36
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    New at this, but I bought a used Marshall practice amp. I just started out with dirkji lessons (Jazz Guitar 101 Arpeggios). When practicing the lesson the amp has a warm and full sound coming out of it. I'm using a telecaster with the rear bridge pickup on.

    Any one else use a Marshall amp for jazz?

  38. #37
    wow. proof you can get a good sound out of anything if you try...

    i'd definitely say a tele bridge pickup thru a marshall isn't very common in the jaz world, but if it sounds good, it is good.

  39. #38
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    I play a ibanez AF105f and a old steinberger GM4sa and both are good for jazz while the first has a tradionnal sound type and more suitable for chords the second is a for very,very fast playing.

  40. #39
    My fave for jazz is my LP (the one they made for Justin Hawkins - but I don't play his music), strat (Limited edition, deluxe players), tele (based on 62 or 66??), ric 381 (which has an arch), 69 gretchs,.... but they are all differnt in character, but perfect for jazz & gospel.

  41. #40
    For what it's worth, I played an inexpensive Epiphone Zephyr Regent and think it sounds great! It is basically a low-budget ES-175 with just a neck humbucker, so it gets that beautiful chunky 175 sound for just a few hundred dollars.


  42. #41
    chitlinsonrye Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by mississippi View Post
    New at this, but I bought a used Marshall practice amp. I just started out with dirkji lessons (Jazz Guitar 101 Arpeggios). When practicing the lesson the amp has a warm and full sound coming out of it. I'm using a telecaster with the rear bridge pickup on.

    Any one else use a Marshall amp for jazz?
    I don't own one, but recently I was in the shop checking out a new guitar, and I plugged it into a Marshall head with a 4x12 cabinet. The warmth of tone made me all mushy inside...gorgeous

  43. #42
    Wow, lots of Tele players here. I finally got one after decades of playing other axes. I opted for the Nashville model with B-bender installed. Nice guitar!


    Has anyone tried the Taylor T-5 for jazz?

  44. #43
    I like the Gibson L5, found a guitar based on that 1920's design and love it.

  45. #44
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    Best Axe

    Quote Originally Posted by gremboul View Post
    I like the Gibson L5, found a guitar based on that 1920's design and love it.
    Yeah, I dig Wes. But--Mr Beaumont told me to check out Grant Green. I did --and I must say Grant has a blues sound that I dig! But getting back to guitars--I have a Strat Squire , not bad for a low cost axe, but I am wondering if a Telecaster would not be better choice for jazz. I tend to favor the F-hole acoustics for the good sound. But, the Strats and Tellie's, etc, are so easy to cradle. Could there be something in between? I want something that is easy to hold, so I can focus on my left hand! Man, at 86 I don't have time to screw around and try a lot of guitars. Mr. Beaumont recently bought a nice axe with one F-hole, it looks something like a Tele. Please excuse my ignorance, I am not familiar with it. But he put it on audio a few months ago and I think it sounded great. Of course, he is an accomplished musician, one I do admire. I like Chris Strangling, another Brit! Mr. Beaumont plays with a lot of feeling, I like his style. I'm sure there are a lot of good musicians on this forum, not to forget our sponsor. I really appreciate this Forum. Any advice?

  46. #45
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    Guitar Telecaster

    This is my first post but I have many years of experience with different kinds of solid body guitars and I thought I could humbly offer what I have learned.

    I too am a huge fan of the fender Telecaster. American Fender Solid Bodies are absolute workhorses and are rediculously versatile in my experience, as are many other major brands I will concede, but what has made me unable to deny myself a fender of some kind is the quality of the necks on both th Strat and the Tele. The availability of the maple fingerboards, the "medium-jumbo frets" the curvature and fret layout and the finish are all highly desirable in my experience. Fender necks have a spaciousness and scale that is perfect for me. Its a matter of comfort and convenience; both of which give me confidence wihile playing that I can't afford to pass up.

    Why I chose the tele given that all traditional fender solid bodies have necks with the qualities I'm picky about has to do with its history, its electronics ( I generally prefer single coil pickups and adore my tele's rhythm/neck pickup), and its overall design.

    History:
    First commercially produced solid body electric guitar which speaks to its reliability, simplicity, and versatility given that it is still among the most popular models made today and that it is mostly unchanged.

    Pickups:
    They are the cleanest and most accurate pickups I've ever experienced. They lend themselves to a great warm, shimmering, inimitable clean tone (obviously nice to have for Jazz oriented playing).

    Overall design:
    Modest cosmetically. I don't like guitars that aspire to be decorative pieces or or works of art instead of tools. I'd prefer that an instrument's cost would come from attention/labor given to the functionality, tonality, playability etc.

    Also it is balanced in the terms of weight and comfortable to wear or hold.

    It's got a charming appearence, as well as an iconic one.

    I play a custom shop 1953, with a custom neck shape. It is primarily a historically accurate "c-shape" except at the 1st 2nd and 3rd frets where it has a tapering v-shape for enhanced comfort fingering taxing chords which is great. Other than that it is perfectly accurate in its replicating a 1953 in the terms of pickups (hand-wound by custom shop) and the like. Neck joint tightness and other specs were specified and the setup was perfected by the tech who commisioned it.

    It's great for almost every application that doesn't involve being overdriven to an extreme due to single coil pickups (which do fine at moderate levels of distortion) but it offers perfection for traditional playing, that is Jazz or Blues or (I have heard) Country.

    The only complaint I would make is that the tuning stability, while fine in-and-of itself, isn't as good as that of a Gibson with a Tune-o-matic bridge as I know from experience. Tuning stability is greatly improved by locking tuners which are easily installed adn are affordable. I don't have them on my 53 to preserve historical accuracy but I have put them on my past American Standards to great effect.

  47. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by kkonopatzke View Post
    This is my first post but I have many years of experience with different kinds of solid body guitars and I thought I could humbly offer what I have learned.

    I too am a huge fan of the fender Telecaster. American Fender Solid Bodies are absolute workhorses and are rediculously versatile in my experience, as are many other major brands I will concede, but what has made me unable to deny myself a fender of some kind is the quality of the necks on both th Strat and the Tele. The availability of the maple fingerboards, the "medium-jumbo frets" the curvature and fret layout and the finish are all highly desirable in my experience. Fender necks have a spaciousness and scale that is perfect for me. Its a matter of comfort and convenience; both of which give me confidence wihile playing that I can't afford to pass up.

    Why I chose the tele given that all traditional fender solid bodies have necks with the qualities I'm picky about has to do with its history, its electronics ( I generally prefer single coil pickups and adore my tele's rhythm/neck pickup), and its overall design.

    History:
    First commercially produced solid body electric guitar which speaks to its reliability, simplicity, and versatility given that it is still among the most popular models made today and that it is mostly unchanged.

    Pickups:
    They are the cleanest and most accurate pickups I've ever experienced. They lend themselves to a great warm, shimmering, inimitable clean tone (obviously nice to have for Jazz oriented playing).

    Overall design:
    Modest cosmetically. I don't like guitars that aspire to be decorative pieces or or works of art instead of tools. I'd prefer that an instrument's cost would come from attention/labor given to the functionality, tonality, playability etc.

    Also it is balanced in the terms of weight and comfortable to wear or hold.

    It's got a charming appearence, as well as an iconic one.

    I play a custom shop 1953, with a custom neck shape. It is primarily a historically accurate "c-shape" except at the 1st 2nd and 3rd frets where it has a tapering v-shape for enhanced comfort fingering taxing chords which is great. Other than that it is perfectly accurate in its replicating a 1953 in the terms of pickups (hand-wound by custom shop) and the like. Neck joint tightness and other specs were specified and the setup was perfected by the tech who commisioned it.

    It's great for almost every application that doesn't involve being overdriven to an extreme due to single coil pickups (which do fine at moderate levels of distortion) but it offers perfection for traditional playing, that is Jazz or Blues or (I have heard) Country.

    The only complaint I would make is that the tuning stability, while fine in-and-of itself, isn't as good as that of a Gibson with a Tune-o-matic bridge as I know from experience. Tuning stability is greatly improved by locking tuners which are easily installed adn are affordable. I don't have them on my 53 to preserve historical accuracy but I have put them on my past American Standards to great effect.
    I agree with you about the telecaster. I have a 52 reissue and it is a workhorse. I replaced the bridge pickup with a seymour duncan mini-bucker, made especially for the tele...works great with jazz-blues....Have to say that my archtop is nothing to sneeze at...

    PS: what strings would you use on a tele to play jazz?

  48. #47
    hey, JC, that's a '69 telecaster thinline. semihollow, reissue, made in mexico. nice bang for the buck...the honeymoon hasn't wore off yet--i love that guitar.

    i use flatwounds on all my teles, .11 gauge. since i teach and also play some western swing, i like to be able to bend a little too. it's a good compromise on feel.

    as far as teles for jazz go, you all know i'm a fan--and m78w, a regualr here, is a hell of a player and a tele man too. if you're a fan of the darker, ed bickert/jim hall tones, a neck humbucker is a nice option--i have one tele with a neck hummer and it's a jazz machine. my other two have single coils, and the jazz tones i get with them are a little more grant green to early jimmy raney-ish. it's good to have options!

    glad to hear you're digging grant green. have you gotten into jimmy raney yet? big influence on grant, actually. the self titled record he made with bob brookmeyer (valve trombone) and a record called simply "A" are among my favorite recorded jazz tones ever--and his playing is phenomenal...the man was the master.

  49. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    hey, JC, that's a '69 telecaster thinline. semihollow, reissue, made in mexico. nice bang for the buck...the honeymoon hasn't wore off yet--i love that guitar.

    i use flatwounds on all my teles, .11 gauge. since i teach and also play some western swing, i like to be able to bend a little too. it's a good compromise on feel.

    as far as teles for jazz go, you all know i'm a fan--and m78w, a regualr here, is a hell of a player and a tele man too. if you're a fan of the darker, ed bickert/jim hall tones, a neck humbucker is a nice option--i have one tele with a neck hummer and it's a jazz machine. my other two have single coils, and the jazz tones i get with them are a little more grant green to early jimmy raney-ish. it's good to have options!

    glad to hear you're digging grant green. have you gotten into jimmy raney yet? big influence on grant, actually. the self titled record he made with bob brookmeyer (valve trombone) and a record called simply "A" are among my favorite recorded jazz tones ever--and his playing is phenomenal...the man was the master.
    It hasn't yet crossed my mind...but at my next string change on the tele, I will put flatwounds. My humbucker is in the bridge position because I didn't want to use a router on the wood to make a larger opening in the neck position...

  50. #49
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    KC area
    Posts
    4,074
    I too have a tele in my arsenal, a Bill Nash made from Fender licensed parts. Jason Lollar pups, with a bucker in the neck and single in the bridge. It is a swiss army knife of guitars.

  51. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by derek View Post
    I too have a tele in my arsenal, a Bill Nash made from Fender licensed parts. Jason Lollar pups, with a bucker in the neck and single in the bridge. It is a swiss army knife of guitars.
    would love to see pics

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