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  1. #401
    Quote Originally Posted by tbone View Post
    Matt,

    thank you very much for your input. This makes sense, I agree with what you said. I guess, in the end it comes down to priorities on which supplemental studies you work as they're supposed to be means to an end. I realize that in the stage of skill development I'm in I should probably concentrate on building up strong fundamentals of rhythm and phrasing. Building up chord vocabulary etc. should buid up on that, and I'll certainly use MB's material for this purpose as planned, but I guess I shouldn't bother with a time schedule (e.g. follow the inherent 1-year-plan). I enjoy my participation in the Herb Ellis study group very much and I guess I should focus on this before anything else when it comes to studying supplemental lessons. I'll give this some further thought, Iguess.

    Greetings,

    T.
    Don't over think too much. (I'm no expert either.)

    Anyway, one method is comping (baker...at least to start), and the other (Ellis) is single note? You need some of both. A week per lesson is pretty doable with baker.
    Last edited by matt.guitarteacher; 02-05-2017 at 11:47 PM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #402

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    Matt,

    no danger of overthinking... I just Need to Focus and avoid to spread to thin, hence my talk about setting priorities. Anyway, I enjoy the process of progress which is not a race, so I'll just take it as it comes...

    Greetings,

    T.

  4. #403

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    There's a lot of confusion around this book, and I think it's worth understanding the basic purpose and context of it, in the time period in which it was published. Mickey Baker is basically about how to "jazz up" very vanilla changes. For those of us who ever tried to play a little before knowing what a real book even was, it was really helpful. Before the real book and similar books came out, you might play off of a basic piece of sheet music for a standard . Very often they had VERY basic harmony , without any of the 251 or 6251 type changes which you see in a real book.

    If you look at Mickey Baker, you'll notice that the "basic" changes underneath his embellished changes are indeed very VERY basic. With that in mind, it's not particularly helpful to try to apply Mickey Baker to a real book, because a real book is already "jazzed up" or embellished in its own Jazz style. Mickey Baker is the same thing in a slightly different style.

    If you want to get the most out of those Mickey Baker exercises, you might try working with some very vanilla changes which you can find from different sources online.
    That makes perfect sense (now you've pointed it out).
    I'll carry on with the 2nd half of the book & stop wondering what to do with the progressions in the first half, you can always use more ways to get round the changes...
    Thanks for the insight...
    Later.

  5. #404

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    A very beginner question, should I practice the book with swing/shuffle rhythm? Or just straight rhythm?

  6. #405

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    Both. Plus any other rhythm you can think of. Plus arpeggios. Plus vary the tempo. You are learning chords, and common chord sequences. They were used for fast songs, slow songs, medium songs, swing, straight, pop songs of the day.

    My Mickey Baker page might be of assistance to you: Mickey Baker – ArchtopGuitar.net - all free.

  7. #406

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    Quote Originally Posted by matt.guitarteacher View Post
    There's a lot of confusion around this book, and I think it's worth understanding the basic purpose and context of it, in the time period in which it was published. Mickey Baker is basically about how to "jazz up" very vanilla changes. For those of us who ever tried to play a little before knowing what a real book even was, it was really helpful. Before the real book and similar books came out, you might play off of a basic piece of sheet music for a standard . Very often they had VERY basic harmony , without any of the 251 or 6251 type changes which you see in a real book.

    If you look at Mickey Baker, you'll notice that the "basic" changes underneath his embellished changes are indeed very VERY basic. With that in mind, it's not particularly helpful to try to apply Mickey Baker to a real book, because a real book is already "jazzed up" or embellished in its own Jazz style. Mickey Baker is the same thing in a slightly different style.

    If you want to get the most out of those Mickey Baker exercises, you might try working with some very vanilla changes which you can find from different sources online.
    Great post, by the way. Do you find that working with the Baker book could help a player learn changes (as in a classic recording of a song) by ear? Or is this better achieved through learning more fundamental principles? Baker is very rote, is what I’m getting at. But is this rote quality useful for the ear?


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  8. #407

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    I always found the "now practise them in all 12 keys" a complete showstopper. Most don't get past Page 1 of Mickey Baker...

  9. #408
    Quote Originally Posted by Kirk Garrett View Post
    Great post, by the way. Do you find that working with the Baker book could help a player learn changes (as in a classic recording of a song) by ear? Or is this better achieved through learning more fundamental principles? Baker is very rote, is what I’m getting at. But is this rote quality useful for the ear?


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    At a basic level, you learn to hear things which you play a lot . So in that sense, yeah. Doesn't mean it's the only way.

    Check out the "vanilla changes" to tunes. Google it online . Then, use Baker approach and methods to embellish . It's a good basic exercise. Then, practice doing similar with a "real book" type of approach: making things into 251's and 6251's etc.

    Of course, at that point, you can then actually check against real book changes , and see what someone else did with it. Again, understand that real book changes are already basically embellished.

    Sent from my SM-J727P using Tapatalk

  10. #409

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    The rote aspect is the most unique thing you’ll find in the book. So many other sources don’t drill in the fact that, well, you need to drill it in. It’s the whole practice vs learning speech.

    not selling anything, just made these to help
    White belt
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  11. #410

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    Ditto for me, and Rob Mackillop before me. I was going to go through the whole book have gotten through lesson 22, maybe will get back to it someday. I have videos of all those lessons on a thread.

    Here's my thread: Mickey Baker Course 1, mp3's and videos

    Here is: Lesson # 17, applying Mickey Baker chords to a jazz standard
    Attached Images Attached Images Mickey Baker's Complete Course in Jazz Guitar-all-me-1-jpg Mickey Baker's Complete Course in Jazz Guitar-all-me-2-jpg Mickey Baker's Complete Course in Jazz Guitar-all-me-3-jpg 
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  12. #411

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    Ditto for me, and Rob Mackillop before me. I was going to go through the whole book have gotten through lesson 22, maybe will get back to it someday. I have videos of all those lessons on a thread.

    Here's my thread: Mickey Baker Course 1, mp3's and videos

    Here is: Lesson # 17, applying Mickey Baker chords to a jazz standard
    Hey Frank,

    This is my 1st post on this forum. I've been messing around with the Mickey Baker book off and on well over a year. I've tried to apply the concepts to some standards along the way (including "All of Me"), but the results never sounded very good. I just watched your "All of Me" video and suddenly the lights came on.

    Seeing your transcription with the substitutions written below the original chords and then hearing you play it over the backing track clarified many things for me. I'm sure there are other examples out there, but this is the 1st time I've seen and heard somebody apply Baker's concepts to an actual standard.

    I don't know if you've ever had the experience of trying to learn something that you were having trouble fully grasping. Then somebody says something or you read something and all the pieces of the puzzle suddenly fall into place. Well, that's what just happened to me with your post.

    Thanks for posting this. I'll definitely be checking out your Mickey Baker thread. I hope you'll post more examples of standards like this.

  13. #412

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    Can anyone please explain MB's chord 9 or A13b9. It has no root note, and I'm struggling to understand the role of the notes. Thanks in advance.

  14. #413

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    A13 = A (R) C# (Major 3rd) E (5th) G (b7) F#(6)

    when both the 6 and the 7 are present, it signifies a 13 chord.

    The b9 note is Bb. You might expect that on top, but Baker puts it in the bass.

    Baker's A13b9 is: Bb G C# F#

    ...only four notes. The notes that are missing are the Root and the 5th. Omitting the 5th is quite common, as it's the least interesting note in this chord. Omitting the Root is less common, but not uncommon in jazz, though it often causes confusion in students.

    Baker strips it down to the interesting bits: 3, 6, b7, b9, or in the order of b9, b7, 3, 6.

    OK?

  15. #414

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    Just a side thought for improvising over this chord...

    The notes C# F# Bb (let's call that Bb an A#) form an F# Major triad: F# A# C#

    So when you see that chord you could use an F# Major triad arpeggio to improvise over it with.

  16. #415

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    A13 = A (R) C# (Major 3rd) E (5th) G (b7) F#(6)

    when both the 6 and the 7 are present, it signifies a 13 chord.

    The b9 note is Bb. You might expect that on top, but Baker puts it in the bass.

    Baker's A13b9 is: Bb G C# F#

    ...only four notes. The notes that are missing are the Root and the 5th. Omitting the 5th is quite common, as it's the least interesting note in this chord. Omitting the Root is less common, but not uncommon in jazz, though it often causes confusion in students.

    Baker strips it down to the interesting bits: 3, 6, b7, b9, or in the order of b9, b7, 3, 6.

    OK?
    Thanks Rob. Why is the C sharp in the key of G major?

  17. #416

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    Jazz tunes/songs tend not to stay in the same key for very long. Just because the key signature is one sharp for G major, doesn't mean it is in that key all the way through, or even for one bar!

    So, the presence of the C# but also the b7 note, G, indicates that we could momentarily be on the V chord in the key of D. That D might be a D Major chord (I don't have the Baker book in front of me) or it might be some kind of D7 chord, which would lead us to G.

    Consider a ii/V/I in G. The chords are Am7 D7 GMaj7. Sometimes that Am7 is changed to some form of A7, for the purposes of leading us more strongly into the D chord. That's what is happening with Baker's A13b9 (I think, as I don't have the book in front of me). Sometimes we call these Secondary Dominants, in that it is not the MAIN dominant (D7 in the key of G).

    So, if Am has become A7, there are a variety of A7 chords we could choose, such as A7b9, A7#9, A7b5, A7#5, A7b59, etc, and also A13b9. These are all variant colours which decorate the V chord, and some will have more or less dissonance to them than others. But whatever you choose, it will eventually lead to the D chord. But remember that that D chord was originally D7 (Am7 D7 GMaj7).

    Does that help?

  18. #417

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    Thanks Rob, and for taking the time to explain. I press on in the hope that one day it will make sense

  19. #418

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    Quote Originally Posted by w3stie View Post
    Can anyone please explain MB's chord 9 or A13b9. It has no root note, and I'm struggling to understand the role of the notes. Thanks in advance.
    This is way above my pay grade and I'm getting in over my head by even commenting here on a theory question, but here's my take on this. First you have to hear this chord in the context of a progression. Check out Lesson 6 exercise 2 for a good example. It's being used as some sort of substitute for the VI chord in a I VI ii V I progression. The I chord (Gmaj7) has a "B" in the bass on 7th fret, the A13b9 a "Bb", the ii chord (Am7) an "A", and the V chord (Mickey's infamous D13b5b9, which is a tritone sub) has an "Ab" in the bass. The progression then resolves to a root position G major. This gives a nice descending chromatic bass line from "B" to "G".

    I think the most important thing with the Mickey Baker book is to really listen to these chords in context and not get too hung up on the theory. Having said that, I must admit to getting hung up on the theory all throughout this book trying to find explanations. So, I empathize with you. I've come to the conclusion that most of the progressions in this book are I vi ii V's in various disguises.

  20. #419

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    Thanks Jack, I've been thinking along the same lines as you. I figured if a guitar chord had no root, it could be almost anything, but its name perhaps would be decided by the chord progression, i.e. it's neighbours or by the bass player. I'm curious about the theory, but not hung up about it. I'm sure it will start to make more sense in time.
    Last edited by w3stie; 07-11-2018 at 05:42 AM.

  21. #420

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    Quote Originally Posted by w3stie View Post
    Thanks Jack, I've been thinking along the same lines as you. I figured if a guitar chord had no root, it could be almost anything, but its name perhaps would be decided by the chord progression, i.e. it's neighbours or by the bass player. I'm curious about the theory, but not hung up about it. I'm sure it will start to make more sense in time.
    Yeah, it will definitely make more sense in time. I can't tell you how many times I've run across something and thought, "I saw that in the MB book." The more I learn the more I realize how many of these things were covered by Baker. The book is incredibly valuable.

    However, there is a serious lack of explanation. I'm guessing that that is the way things were taught back then. Just do what I tell you, get it under your fingers and in your ear, and then go out and apply it. Don't worry about why.

    I'm going thru the MB book again from beginning to end. I never did the 2nd half. The standard notation scared me off, but I now know enough to struggle my way thru it.

    On another note: I saw a video by Peter Rogine where he says that Mickey Baker just took the lessons from his teacher and compiled them into books. In other words, Mickey Baker didn't actually write the books. Don't know if this is true or not. In the end it really doesn't matter because it was Baker who made this material available to us. It probably would have stayed with his teacher if Baker didn't publish it.

  22. #421

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    Baker took lessons from Rector Bailey, a Brooklyn-based multi-instrumentalist. Here are some links if you're interested in knowing a little more about him.

    Mickey Baker: A Tough Customer Who Never Lost His Edge - JazzTimes (Bailey is mentioned in paragraph 4)

    THE JAZZ GUITARIST (with forays into related genres): Mickey Baker (Recollections from some of Bailey's students)

    Who was Rector Bailey? (Post #3 is from one of Bailey's former students)
    "Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can." (Arthur Ashe)

  23. #422

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    Like many others I got the Baker book in the 60s. I can't say that I've been through every page but it was a huge help and a good kick start. I picked up Vol. 2 not too many years ago where he takes things farther. I didn't put tons of time into it, too many of the chords required a reach that I don't have. Does anyone have any comments on Vol 2?

  24. #423

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrcee View Post
    Like many others I got the Baker book in the 60s. I can't say that I've been through every page but it was a huge help and a good kick start. I picked up Vol. 2 not too many years ago where he takes things farther. I didn't put tons of time into it, too many of the chords required a reach that I don't have. Does anyone have any comments on Vol 2?
    For me too, "too many of the chords required a reach that I don't have".
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  25. #424

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    I really like the book, it has some nice "chord melodies." besides, it couldn't hurt to work on those stretches. Have you seen Jimmy Bruno play them? He appears to have really small hands, but can play Johnny Smith type chords. They are hard, but they sound GREAT
    White belt
    My Youtube

  26. #425

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    My hands are decent size but I lost the tip of my pinky so I'm out on the big stretches but I gave Vol. 2 a run for the money anyway playing partial chords and what I could. Anyone who's gotten anything out of Vol. 1 should give it a look. If I remember correctly it's a lot different that Vol. 1.

  27. #426

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dad3353 View Post
    Good afternoon, Bob...

    The first book shown on the Amazon page (blue cover...) is the later, revised edition of the third (original...) book (yellow cover...). They are almost the same contents, with a few corrections in the blue one.
    I use only the yellow one, but that's only for nostalgic reasons (I'm going through my third copy in 40 years...). I have the revised edition, but I'm old and stubborn.
    The second volume (red cover...) is a kind of 'sequel' to the first, and is considered rather an 'optional extra' more than 'must have'. The methodology differs, and there is even less in the way of explanation (as if that were possible..!) than the volume I. useful, and instructive, but not to the same degree as Vol I.
    If there is one to have, it should be the blue one. If you want both, get the blue and red. The yellow one (older edition...) is for sentimental old codgers like myself.
    Hope this helps.
    The above description pretty much tells the story.

    I picked up books 1 and 2 in the late 60s or early 70s. The new blue book contains the contents of the black and yellow book 1. The blue book is a bit smaller.

    My book 2 cover is different than the current offering.
    Attached Images Attached Images Mickey Baker's Complete Course in Jazz Guitar-book-1-new-original-jpg Mickey Baker's Complete Course in Jazz Guitar-mb-book-2-jpg 

  28. #427

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    Nice that they have combined both into one book.

  29. #428

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    I took out my copy of Volume 1 over the weekend. I'm doing the exercises that begin part 2 again. They really are useful. I know the guitar neck (fingerboard) better than I used to, and I'm committed to a five-position approach (-which doesn't mean I can't do other things; it means I know these five positions really well), which fits with these "runs".
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  30. #429

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    I should probably go to Section 2, at 79 I'm never going to comp, just like single note flat pick stuff!

  31. #430

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    Quote Originally Posted by goinbaroke View Post
    I should probably go to Section 2, at 79 I'm never going to comp, just like single note flat pick stuff!
    You can do both!

    Frank Vignola has drummed one thing into my head above all others: learn songs and play songs. I think all of Mickey's lessons in part 1 assume that one is playing standard tunes. When you see something in a lesson, think, "Where can I put this in a tune I play?" When you can take it from a lesson book and put it in a tune you play, well, you can't help but feel good.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  32. #431

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    That's great info Mark, I hate to give up the MB section 1 but I'm more into playing songs note by note using tabs, only for my own amusement. I can do section 1 & 2 together as I have the time to do it!! I have leukemia and just play to keep my old punkin alive for awhile!! LOL

  33. #432

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    My right hand picking and strumming were always weak points.

    I'm going through book 1 as a refresher: part 1 to practice different right hand rhythms to the more or less familar chord progressions, and part 2 picking technique and riffs.

  34. #433

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    Quote Originally Posted by goinbaroke View Post
    That's great info Mark, I hate to give up the MB section 1 but I'm more into playing songs note by note using tabs, only for my own amusement. I can do section 1 & 2 together as I have the time to do it!! I have leukemia and just play to keep my old punkin alive for awhile!! LOL
    Sorry to hear about the leukemia. My nephew Adam was diagnosed with that just before his 3rd birthday. He's in his 40s now, thanks mainly to St. Jude's research hospital in Memphis. He spent a lot of his childhood there. He had a teddy bear and everything the doctors did to him, he would use the bear to demonstrate to his family what he'd been through. That bear had some tough times!
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  35. #434

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    Wow, sorry to hear about the little guy, I've at least lived to near 80, I have Myleoidplastica Leukemia, white blood platlets are the problem. I try to stay upbeat!

    I wish I'd learned more music theory, I'm just using tabs and going thru MBs book, keeps me occupied and love to hear you guys playing on the forum.

  36. #435

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    Hi folks. Is there a mistake in lesson 16? In the first two columns ( G7 to C7 ), the sixth staff from the top shows
    | G11 / G7b5 / | Cm7 / C7b5 / |

    Should the third chord there be Gm7 not Cm7 as written? It makes more sense positionally.

    thanks again

    Rob

  37. #436

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    Quote Originally Posted by w3stie View Post
    Hi folks. Is there a mistake in lesson 16? In the first two columns ( G7 to C7 ), the sixth staff from the top shows
    | G11 / G7b5 / | Cm7 / C7b5 / |

    Should the third chord there be Gm7 not Cm7 as written? It makes more sense positionally.

    thanks again

    Rob
    I agree with you that it should be labeled Gm7. Cm7 doesn't make any sense to me in this context.

    On another note: I much as I love this book (I'm going thru the 1st half for the 3rd time) I still get confused by the way Mickey names chords - naming them for the chord they're substituting for.

  38. #437

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    i don’t think it’s a mistake
    White belt
    My Youtube

  39. #438

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    1st clue is we have the G11, we have sus sound.
    The Cm is an Eb6
    The Eb6 is F7 sus
    The F7 comes from the biii dim
    which pulls to your ii or V7 (or even the 1)

    It’s like that progression that goes ii-V7-iiim7b5-VI7
    White belt
    My Youtube

  40. #439

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    1st clue is we have the G11, we have sus sound.
    The Cm is an Eb6
    The Eb6 is F7 sus
    The F7 comes from the biii dim
    which pulls to your ii or V7 (or even the 1)

    It’s like that progression that goes ii-V7-vii-iiim7b5-VI7
    Joe, I was just about to ask you to elaborate a little. However, the way it's written in the book has you jumping from the 9th fret down to the 3rd fret and back up to the 9th. A Mickey's Form 18 of a Cm7 is at the 3rd fret. A Form 24 C7b5 is at the 9th fret (this is actually a Gb7, the Tritone sub of C7). That doesn't make sense to me from a voice leading point of view. Additionally, it simply doesn't sound good to me either (I'm looking at it as if the next chord would some sort of F).

    I know just enough music theory to be dangerous, so any further explanation from you would be very helpful.

  41. #440

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack E Blue View Post
    Joe, I was just about to ask you to elaborate a little. However, the way it's written in the book has you jumping from the 9th fret down to the 3rd fret and back up to the 9th. A Mickey's Form 18 of a Cm7 is at the 3rd fret. A Form 24 C7b5 is at the 9th fret (this is actually a Gb7, the Tritone sub of C7). That doesn't make sense to me from a voice leading point of view. Additionally, it simply doesn't sound good to me either (I'm looking at it as if the next chord would some sort of F).

    I know just enough music theory to be dangerous, so any further explanation from you would be very helpful.
    Well yeah that voiceleading is garbage. however, when comping sometimes a big leap like that is cool (if it’s the exception). The next chord is actually Dm7 to D dim, and I think of this whole thing as being in C maj
    White belt
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  42. #441

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    Well yeah that voiceleading is garbage. however, when comping sometimes a big leap like that is cool (if it’s the exception). The next chord is actually Dm7 to D dim, and I think of this whole thing as being in C maj
    Joe, we're going to have to agree to disagree on this one. Using Occam's razor (much sharper than a Gillette ) the simplest explanation is that it's a typo - "C" instead of a "G".

    I understand what you're saying about voice leading. You may want a big jump for effect, but in this case the voicing is simply not logical when you look at Lesson 16 in it's entirety.

    Additionally, you're being forced to jump through hoops to explain why a Cm7 is correct when my ears tell me otherwise. To quote Groucho Marx, "Who are you going to believe, me or your own eyes?"

    You, undoubtedly, have more knowledge of music theory than I do and your young ears are probably much better than mine. However, I'm going with my own ears and my own sense of logic on this one and say that it's a typo in the book.

    Oh, and one more thing, the next chord is not a Dm7. That Dm7 is a separate example under the column G7 > Cmi. It has nothing to do with the 1st column, G7 > C7. Each example is 2 bars long. I think you're looking at it as a continuos line of music. There are 3 columns of examples - G7 > C7; G7 > Cmi; G7 > Cmaj.

  43. #442

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    i need to start just keeping my trap shut on these questions haha
    White belt
    My Youtube

  44. #443

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758 View Post
    i need to start just keeping my trap shut on these questions haha
    Ah, come on man. I always read and enjoy your posts.

    Now, for the big question. Do you now think it's a typo in the book or are you sticking with your story? I won't be able to sleep until I see your answer.

  45. #444

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    Thanks for the replies. I know from previous comments that the book has numerous typos, which leads me to believe it is more likely a typo. The preceding progression on that lesson is | Dm7 / Dm6 / | Gm7 / C13 / | So in the context of the rest of the lesson, he is playing positionally, that is showing progressions which group close together on the fretboard. So in that context, the Cm7 jump to the third position from the tenth stands out. I'm not saying the Cm7 is wrong, but was that MB's intent?

  46. #445

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    Quote Originally Posted by w3stie View Post
    Thanks for the replies. I know from previous comments that the book has numerous typos, which leads me to believe it is more likely a typo. The preceding progression on that lesson is | Dm7 / Dm6 / | Gm7 / C13 / | So in the context of the rest of the lesson, he is playing positionally, that is showing progressions which group close together on the fretboard. So in that context, the Cm7 jump to the third position from the tenth stands out. I'm not saying the Cm7 is wrong, but was that MB's intent?
    I agree with you 100% that this was a typo. I don't think this book had an editor. If so, he was the worst editor in music book history. The word "course" is used for "chorus" in several places. The v (minor) is referred to as the relative minor. These are just the errors I found with my limited knowledge. There are probably others.

    Anyway, that was a good catch, Rob. I'm working through this book for the 3rd time. If there's anything else in this book that you'd like to discuss I'm ready, willing and able.

  47. #446

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    Somewhere around here I found a link to a pdf correcting errors in Mickey's book.

    That ringing a bell with anyone?

    I can't find it just now.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  48. #447

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack E Blue View Post
    I agree with you 100% that this was a typo. I don't think this book had an editor. If so, he was the worst editor in music book history. The word "course" is used for "chorus" in several places. The v (minor) is referred to as the relative minor. These are just the errors I found with my limited knowledge. There are probably others.

    Anyway, that was a good catch, Rob. I'm working through this book for the 3rd time. If there's anything else in this book that you'd like to discuss I'm ready, willing and able.
    Thanks Jack, I'm also working through for the second time, but I'm taking pains to do everything he suggests, e.g. writing everything out, transposing etc. Just plodding through at the moment and not worrying if things don't make perfect sense. Except for these typos! I'll keep on posting here if I hit a snag or get a bright idea :/

    Rob

  49. #448

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes View Post
    Somewhere around here I found a link to a pdf correcting errors in Mickey's book.

    That ringing a bell with anyone?

    I can't find it just now.
    That would be very useful thanks Mark

  50. #449

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack E Blue View Post
    Ah, come on man. I always read and enjoy your posts.

    Now, for the big question. Do you now think it's a typo in the book or are you sticking with your story? I won't be able to sleep until I see your answer.
    Mickey Baker's Complete Course in Jazz Guitar-b1cad6f0-18f7-42da-bb6f-d084947d9b52-jpg
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  51. #450

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    Quote Originally Posted by w3stie View Post
    Thanks Jack, I'm also working through for the second time, but I'm taking pains to do everything he suggests, e.g. writing everything out, transposing etc. Just plodding through at the moment and not worrying if things don't make perfect sense. Except for these typos! I'll keep on posting here if I hit a snag or get a bright idea :/

    Rob
    I admire your self-discipline. This is my 3rd time through the 1st half and I'm still not doing it as Baker suggests. Coincidentally, I happen to be on Lesson 16 which is why I jumped on your question. I'm going to take a crack at applying this stuff to some standards as per Lesson 17. Frank Pratte (a forum regular) made a video using MB's chord substitutions on "All of Me." If you haven't seen it just do a search on YouTube for Frank Pratte. It was very helpful see to someone actually apply these concepts to a real song. Now I just need to buckle down and try it myself.

    As far as the 2nd half of the book goes I never got past lesson 30. (Standard notation is a struggle for me). I set some goals for August. One of those is to complete lesson 34 by the end of the month while reviewing the 1st half. Half the month has gone by and I haven't even started. I need to get moving and learn some "Hot" guitar.

    BTW, every time I go through the book things make more and more sense. The pieces of the puzzle are slowly coming together.