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  1. #1

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    Very expensive pedal but after watching all 13+ minutes of this I may just dig deep at some point and buy one of these. I wish all gear was demo'ed this well.


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  3. #2

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    the best way to think of it is that you're paying $150 for the trem and $150 for the reverb. from that angle, for the quality you're getting, its more than worth it. an extra favorite switch lets you store a preset for instant recall for extra flexibility. and they are roughly $250ish used.

    personally, i like that its relatively straightforward. there are secondary functions, but i don't even use those. i think it excels at more ambient types of reverb, but i get plainer, ampy sounds just fine. this one pedal is enough to be your only pedal for a jazz gig, i'd imagine. you could easily build a small pedal board around it.

    one downside, if you want to call it that, is that the recent versions have the soft click switches. which i don't hate, per se, its just that i always hit them too hard because all my other pedals have regular switches. it also seems happiest with the included power supply. i forget if it acts out or simply doesn't work without it.

    i still have a soft spot for strymon, because i used to deliver to them. still have my giant damage control pedal, too. nice guys, very knowledgeable. it helps when the designers can play and take the time to make an in depth demo in house that eschews pyrotechnics and visual flash for detailed insights. and the perversity of using an agile to demo a pedal that probably costs more is awesome.

  4. #3

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    I just sold mine. Terrific pedal just was not using it enough and the sale made the difference
    on getting a guitar I wanted. I don't think I will buy another trem or reverb until i can get another Flint.


    I still have an El Capistan which covers some reverb duties but a Flint is on the wish list.

  5. #4

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    Love this pedal. If you put it on a pedal board you will have to make sure your power supply will work with it.
    It's one of those digital pedals that needs the correct supply so you don't get any hum.

    A Voodoo Labs Pedal Power works for me.

    More importantly it's a great sounding pedal. Both the rev and the trem really deliver.

  6. #5

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    meh...Reverb didn't sound like a real fender spring reverb to me and the other sounds didn't move me as much as the wet reverb. I did love the tremelo but $300 for a trem with mediocre reverb is too much. Was he maxing out the reverb capabilities of this device?

    The wet reverb is unique because it doesn't try to do spring reverb which is ridiculously hard to do from an algorithm and physics standpoint but what the wet *DOES* do, it does fabulously. It's 2 year old tech though so it's possibly there's something better out...

  7. #6

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    Jack, I have it plugged into my DRR and the reverb is identical to the Fender when I A B them.…….to my ears.
    So it's very handy when I'm using the Mambo head to have the Fender like reverb.

  8. #7

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    not if it sounds like that clip. I've listened to 2 clips that supposedly nail the deluxe reverb spring reverb tone (BYOC and this one) and IMO, neither comes close.

    And philco, that's not a fair test. A fair test is plugging direct into a board and having the reverb characteristics sounding identical. Otherwise, you're buffering the digital reverb with a tube preamp.

    That's like saying I plugged the Barber BarbEQ into a fender showman and it nailed the fender preamp tone.

  9. #8

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    Perhaps you should be in a room with one and not relying on You Tube clips.

    It sounds like a Fender Spring to me when I record it into PTools HD.
    Better to my ears than some of my spring rev plugs that have supposedly been modelled on the Fender.

    I've already got the real one for comparison so I'll trust my ears.

  10. #9

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    no pedal can come close to the processing power of a 32 or 64 bit plugin.

  11. #10

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    It's about the modelling. There are plenty of plugs that don't deliver on the promise. Not because they don't have the power. Depends who programmed it I guess.

    I can't state as a fact that the Strymon is the best emulation of a Fender Spring. I wouldn't be able to prove that.
    Sounds good in my studio next to my Fender amp is what I'm saying. Also sounds good recorded. To me.

    Jim should take a guitar down to the store and try a bunch of them out.

  12. #11

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    Ooh, cheaper than fixing the dysfunctional reverb and tremolo on, er, ah, several of my old Ampegs. Maybe it's time to retire the ART MR-1 I've been using since sometime in the 1990s. Yeah, good demo.

  13. #12

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    Anyone A-B Flint and Bluesky?

  14. #13

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    I tried one at a store some time ago and liked it a lot - the plate and hall sounded a little more realistic than the spring but the spring sounded quite good still. Close enough to a real tank for me. I am not a tremolo expert but it also sounded excellent to my ears.

    If I used tremolo I would consider one... and I agree Jim, the demo is pretty good. I think you will like the pedal, worth going into a store to try it for sure.

  15. #14

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    Yeah , they do nice demos. I have had 3 Strymon pedals and played them all. They All had the same flaw when it comes to the gain corection. It brightens up you sound and makes it harch. The basic effects sounds good to me but they just affect your dry path sound to much. It took me a while to figure out what it was and i did at first think they where greate. But after a while i spent more time with my amp settings to get my basic sound back then acctually using the strymon.

    The even more expensive Timeline, Mobius and Big sky does not have that problem at all. El Cap , blue sky and Flint and Oleo does. I guess they like that kind of thing because it should be very obvious to them.

    Blue sky and Flint are way diffrent. Blue sky has much more control parameters and sounds.

    I tried all the Strymons. The smaller pedals are in my opinion to coloured for my taste and leaves to many artifacts in your basic guitarsound.

    Lately i`ve acctually started to use the first Boss reverb pedal from the 80`s over my Eventide space. Its somehow easier to play with the old thing... Maybe im getting old.


    /H
    Last edited by Hjalmiz; 02-18-2014 at 10:04 AM.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker

    The wet reverb is unique because it doesn't try to do spring reverb which is ridiculously hard to do from an algorithm and physics standpoint but what the wet *DOES* do, it does fabulously. It's 2 year old tech though so it's possibly there's something better out...
    I've got a Neunaber Wet Stereo Reverb. It's really nice, I use it with Henriksen amp and sometimes also with a Deluxe Reverb, after removing the onboard spring reverb.
    However I have the impression that (strange thing, good or bad, it depends...) it changes the basic sound of the guitar, especially when I play notes on the top two strings, kind of thinning the sound.

  17. #16

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    Wow... thanks for sharing that!

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz_175
    I've got a Neunaber Wet Stereo Reverb. It's really nice, I use it with Henriksen amp and sometimes also with a Deluxe Reverb, after removing the onboard spring reverb.
    However I have the impression that (strange thing, good or bad, it depends...) it changes the basic sound of the guitar, especially when I play notes on the top two strings, kind of thinning the sound.
    All reverb/delaypedals have that problem more or less. Your sound will loose energy due to gain and acoustic issues.

    Strymon tries to solve that by having a boost function. I does not work for them very well. Try using a parallell loop and blend the wet/dry analog. Most blenders have a boost. I`ve had good results with Xblender and the Lehle paralell. Expensive i know, but these are the parts that are expensive to build in a digital pedal and its where they save money. Higher digital resolutions are not the fix in my view. Its a better compensation in the blend stage that is the issue.

    Btw, i do think some pedals change the dry sound in a plessant way.

    /H
    Last edited by Hjalmiz; 02-18-2014 at 10:24 AM.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hjalmiz
    Yeah , they do nice demos. I have had 3 Strymon pedals and played them all. They All had the same flaw when it comes to the gain corection. It brightens up you sound and makes it harch. The basic effects sounds good to me but they just affect your dry path sound to much. It took me a while to figure out what it was and i did at first think they where greate. But after a while i spent more time with my amp settings to get my basic sound back then acctually using the strymon.

    The even more expensive Timeline, Mobius and Big sky does not have that problem at all. El Cap , blue sky and Flint and Oleo does. I guess they like that kind of thing because it should be very obvious to them.

    Blue sky and Flint are way diffrent. Blue sky has much more control parameters and sounds.

    I tried all the Strymons. The smaller pedals are in my opinion to coloured for my taste and leaves to many artifacts in your basic guitarsound.

    Lately i`ve acctually started to use the first Boss reverb pedal from the 80`s over my Eventide space. Its somehow easier to play with the old thing... Maybe im getting old.


    /H
    i also like the boss RV2 but haven't played one in a few years. I still like my digiverb. It's not as good as the new series of verbs but sounds fine for live playing. For a recording I would want something better. I haven't noticed that about the buffers but that was a deal-breaker with the original TC Analog chorus. I complained to them and they claimed it was totally transparent but if you run one in an a/b loop you can hear it. I always wondered why they went straight to digital and never made a better version of that....

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazz_175
    I've got a Neunaber Wet Stereo Reverb. It's really nice, I use it with Henriksen amp and sometimes also with a Deluxe Reverb, after removing the onboard spring reverb.
    However I have the impression that (strange thing, good or bad, it depends...) it changes the basic sound of the guitar, especially when I play notes on the top two strings, kind of thinning the sound.
    i never noticed that with the wet. I'll look out for that next time I try one.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by disco~juice
    Anyone A-B Flint and Bluesky?
    I had a Bluesky (which replaced an aging Lexicon LXP-1) but sold it when the Flint was released. I love a good hall reverb and the Bluesky, despite its extensive shaping options, doesn't do a hall (though I was able to get some nice sounds from it).

    The Flint for me is the right combination of quality sounds and ease-of-use. I will routinely use its spring reverb in place of my Deluxe Reverb's own reverb.

  22. #21

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    In the "for what it's worth department", a feature of the Flint that has not been mentioned is the ability to have the signal go out mono or stereo. I like this option and the easy ability to send the path to two separate amps. I then have the reverb covered for both amps and can play, individually, with other toys in front of each amp independently. Of course, then I reach the point of craziness and pull everything apart and go from guitar directly to one amp. But it provides the option. I love mine.

  23. #22

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    I think the demo sounds great. But I don't think any reverb pedal is worth the price of this one. It's not as audible of effect for me in a gig situation since I use reverb lightly. And some rooms sound good enough without any added reverb.

    As far as some of the others... I had a Nunaber Wet mono reverb. I didn't like it after a while. My cheapo behringer rv600 was able to be dialed in to sound close to it when I put them next to each other and tried. I've settled on a mad professor silver spring. I got mine used, otherwise I think it's too pricey too.

    There are new reverb pedals from Catalinbread and Mojo Hand likely worth checking out too.

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by hallpass
    I think the demo sounds great. But I don't think any reverb pedal is worth the price of this one. It's not as audible of effect for me in a gig situation since I use reverb lightly. And some rooms sound good enough without any added reverb.

    As far as some of the others... I had a Nunaber Wet mono reverb. I didn't like it after a while. My cheapo behringer rv600 was able to be dialed in to sound close to it when I put them next to each other and tried. I've settled on a mad professor silver spring. I got mine used, otherwise I think it's too pricey too.

    There are new reverb pedals from Catalinbread and Mojo Hand likely worth checking out too.
    It's not a reverb pedal. It's a reverb and tremolo pedal. If you're not after both effects then there's really no reason to consider this pedal but if you want both trem and verb then you need to compare it to the price of two pedals, not one. I've used reverb and tremolo for most of the last 50 years. Right now I don't have trem (other than in my modeler). I've been trying to play that way for the last few months as an experiment but I find that there are times, mostly when I've been listening to older recordings, where I miss the trem and the idea of one deal instead of two is attractive to me.

  25. #24

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    I love this pedal. Expensive but well worth it. After buying it I only wished I had boughten it sooner. A little bit of trem makes my mediocre ballad playing sound a lot better haha

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Soloway
    It's not a reverb pedal. It's a reverb and tremolo pedal. If you're not after both effects then there's really no reason to consider this pedal but if you want both trem and verb then you need to compare it to the price of two pedals, not one. I've used reverb and tremolo for most of the last 50 years. Right now I don't have trem (other than in my modeler). I've been trying to play that way for the last few months as an experiment but I find that there are times, mostly when I've been listening to older recordings, where I miss the trem and the idea of one deal instead of two is attractive to me.
    That's a good point, my bad. I'm not sure why I was only considering the reverb. Maybe because I have tremolo built into my amps. As feet mentioned, the best way to think of it is that you're paying $150 for the trem and $150 for the reverb. Seems much more reasonably priced thinking of it that way.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hjalmiz
    Yeah , they do nice demos. I have had 3 Strymon pedals and played them all. They All had the same flaw when it comes to the gain corection. It brightens up you sound and makes it harch.
    This in all likelihood would be a buffer being kicked in -- which a good thing. It means your signal chain is being degraded by all of the cables and boxes in the path to the amp. When the buffer (i.e. the Strymon) is suddenly introduced, all of the treble bleed is rectified and your sound is much brighter.

    Try this: put a good buffer (a quality clean boost pedal set to unity ought to work) first in line right after the guitar with a short quality cable -- like a George L's -- then use another longer cable out to the amp. Tune your amp and guitar to the sound with the buffer inline -- when on it should be practically indistinguishable from the sound of the same short cable going directly from the guitar to the amp. Then add the Strymon into the signal chain after the buffer, turn it on and chances are you'll hear NO tonal shift. I use an RC Booster or the boost side of a ZVex BoR for this purpose. I do NOT like Boss buffers as many of them color the sound, i.e. reduce treble.

    People with large pedalboards often recommend the signal chain start with a buffer that is always on, followed by true-bypass pedals. Of course, buffer sensitive pedals like fuzzfaces and wahs need to come before the buffer.

    OTOH, you might be one of those people who likes a degraded signal -- like Hendrix using coiled cables to reduce the treble hitting the amp.

  28. #27

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    Hi DG. Im not Talking about a signal loss issue due to pedals or cables. These pedals have a "knob second function boost" when blending wet/dry signal you Will have a signal loss issue. The boost is basicly a volume correction to not have a volume drop when using the effect. Thats greate.And sure its good for the big pedalboard signal loss thing in theory. But thats not what in talking about. When using the strymon(blue sky lets say) boost function even without the reverb mixed in your tone changes a LOT . Thats not strange realy but the sound of the boost is vierd. Or it very vierd To me anyways. Its not brightning as u Would expect. Its a hard allmost top conpressing thing that goes on with it. Its a bit like playing a Gibson with a to straight neck when u kick the pedal in but on higher volume .Ive Done every test possible and the fact remains. Now, this is not the case with the Strymon timeline for instance .

    I have boost pedals that are very transparent and Some that are voiced to faten up the sound. But the strymon boost kills my sound. As i Said , the effects are nice but the way that the pedal changes my sound is not. I know a few people that gave up on them for the same reason. But hey, buy if u like them. I think there are Better pedals to buy out there.
    If you try one out, let me know.
    /H

  29. #28

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    New demo, if anyone cares

  30. #29

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    not me, i already have one. if it helps, i think of them this way:

    61 harm- phasey, throbby
    63 tube- pulse-y, standard (sine)
    65 photo- choppy (square)

    60s- spring
    70s- plate
    80- hall

    i tend to use the plate the most, but either the plate or spring works as my "always on" sound. the hall is fun at more exaggerated settings to get a more ambient, modulated sound. the plate works ok for that, too. i don't mess with it too much; i know what sounds i'm after and a quick flick can get me there. there is a lot to discover if you insist on that sort of thing. need to get a favorite switch so i can switch to a preset, but it isn't a huge deal.