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  1. #1

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    Looking at ES-175 clones -- any thoughts between aria pro, westone session ii, greco ...? I do enjoy the charm/heritage, but how would something newer like archtop tribute compare?

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  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by keithiopian
    Looking at ES-175 clones -- any thoughts between aria pro, westone session ii, greco ...? I do enjoy the charm/heritage, but how would something newer like archtop tribute compare?
    Most of the Matsumoku copies are really good, especially if they are from the 1970's. Assuming they are in good condition. The ES175 clones seem to have more variability than the L5ces clones. On the ES175 copies I see some with scarf joints and heel splices and some without. That's not in itself a big deal, I can't tell that scarf joints and heel splices make any difference in tone and it's likely they produce a stronger neck, but the fact is some have them and some don't, and the ones that don't are by that closer copies to the ES175.

    But if you get a good, solid Matsumoku ES175 copy with the original (Maxxon?) pickups, you'll have a very fine playing and fine sounding guitar. It doesn't matter what name is on the headstock. Aria Pro II, Greco, Bradley, all are labels for the very fine instrument from Japan.

    I have no direct experience sith the archtop tribute guitars, but they look great and I have not heard anything but positive things about them. I'm jonesing for an ES350 copy with the CC pickup....

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by keithiopian
    Looking at ES-175 clones -- any thoughts between aria pro, westone session ii, greco ...? I do enjoy the charm/heritage, but how would something newer like archtop tribute compare?

  5. #4

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    I had a Greco ES-175 copy, would have been from the mid 1970s. Unlike the Gibson, the Greco had a laminated spruce top. The neck was maple, generally ES-175s have mahogany necks (although a lot of 1970's Gibsons had maple necks too). Unlike the Gibson, the braces on the Greco are not kerfed (in my opinion a good thing!).

    While the guitar had a good sound, I found the narrow/thin neck really hard to get used to. For me it was very uncomfortable to play. I ended up trading it for another instrument for that reason.

  6. #5
    Currently found a very nice aria pro ii ea 650 from 76 and a Greco n-60, any reason to steer one direction or the other?

  7. #6

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    I bought a '75 Greco last month and I'm impressed. Nice pickups too!
    Sure, the neck is a bit narrow, but that's the price you pay for copying Norlin era Gibsons!
    It doesn't bother as much these days, luckily my fingers are long and thin
    A lot of those Japanese necks got wider in the 80's when Gibson went back to original spec
    Except for Tokai, their necks are still narrow, they didn't get the memo

    Attack of the clones by Matsumoku-greco-jpg

  8. #7

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    Not quite a clone in construction and one of the cheaper 175 a likes is my newly acquired Sakura.
    I've just received a new set of Chrome 12s so now I can get it set up.Attack of the clones by Matsumoku-my-sakura-jpg

  9. #8
    Went with the Aria Pro 650. Pics soon!

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by keithiopian
    Went with the Aria Pro 650. Pics soon!
    I've read somewhere here that this Aria is one with a sound post. Would that be correct?
    I look forward to seeing the pics. Cheers.

  11. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by garybaldy
    I've read somewhere here that this Aria is one with a sound post. Would that be correct?
    I look forward to seeing the pics. Cheers.
    It does indeed have a sound post. curious, that! generally amazed at the condition, just took the electronics out for a pot replacement and a bit of TLC, but after a little setup it'll be stellar i think!