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  1. #26

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    finally, on reflection, - it has prevented me from sleeping since the opening of this topic -, those who are more interested in material than music are right: no forum of jazz, guitar, or both, no theories of jazz and perhaps even no jazz or guitar teacher won't teach them how to have talent

    this is what makes the tragedy of those who strive to make it seem otherwise, either that they must show that they are indispensable, or that they are not persuaded themselves

    Hey, don't commit suicide, jazz guitar teachers, isn't it important to make a living, not your death?

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #27

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    Having a great passion for music and having an interest in the gear to make that music usually go together. They are certainly not mutually exclusive pursuits.

  4. #28

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    in any case, most of the answers to Drumbler are beside what he sees, and what everyone can see, the disproportion between interest for music and interest for the gear, in which it would still be necessary to distinguish the questions and answers that are legitimate for musicians, about such qualities expected from a guitar, a pickup or an amp, and a form of fetishism for this material, the ultimate trademarks...

    in short, we pretend to be concerned about this disproportion amounts to criticizing the legitimate interest of musicians in their tools, which is not the spirit of these critics

  5. #29

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    When we talk about gear is the only time we agree with each other.

  6. #30

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    A few years back, my quartet was playing an outdoor gig at a country club. It was a family event, so they had food, drinks, bouncy-houses, music (us!), and a couple clowns doing tricks with the kids. We took a break, and our drummer walks up from getting some food (since drummers are always eating and/or drinking!) and he said, "I just walked past the clowns over there: they were talking about oversized shoes and make-up!"

  7. #31

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    I come here mainly for the music talk (probably 90% of my activity here and it's been a while), but it's nice to have a page dedicated to Jazz gear. (The regular visitor of TGP knows nuthin' about Jazz).

    By the way, I'm also into fly fishing It takes a lot of patience and practicing. Just like guitar playing. Most people don't have that focus and commitment, but express their love for the art by buying and collecting gear. Unfortunately it's not always that harmless, because collector mentality introduces a lot of BS and myths related to gear that have no reality substance. People are too eager protecting their investments rather than making music.

    Musicians like to play and collectors like to talk and show off their collection, therefore many discussions get unbalanced favoring the point of view of the collector.

    Now, you may argue that also famous players have a guitar collection. Of course they do. That's a pretty easy way of making money, since the true collector pay premium for a piece of "history" and a certificate stating that this guitar once belonged to the famous Mr. Player. Some players probably make more money on trading gear than making music.

  8. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCat
    That's a pretty easy way of making money, since the true collector pay premium for a piece of "history" and a certificate stating that this guitar once belonged to the famous Mr. Player.
    so if I want to sell my guitar, I must not say that it belongs to me

  9. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    so if I want to sell my guitar, I must not say that it belongs to me
    Just tell them that you are the custodian of a very rare piece that belongs to the house of <player name> that you need the cash now and that you're willing to give them 20% discount provided you don't have to produce the paper work. Works every time

  10. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick
    When we talk about gear is the only time we agree with each other.
    Not so sure !
    We've seen strong arguments about neck heavy guitars, pros and cons of tubes vs SS, the "muddiness" of such a speaker or such a pick up, the comparison of different thickness of guitar tops in the ages, headstock shape of a certain guitar brand, ….
    Never say : "Gibson quality control" in a thread !
    Ouch ! Sorry I did !

  11. #35

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    It takes a lot of work to be even able to play jazz shittily.

    I own too many guitars, really. Nothing particularly expensive though, and they all get played.

    I think talking about guitars and gear is fun because everybody get in and get nerdy on it, no matter what their level of play.

    I saw a pretty funny clip of a comedienne the other day where she talked about how if a woman wants something expensive, like say, a diamond ring, it's customary to have a relationship, fall in love, and have the guy buy it for you...she wondered aloud how funny it would be if guys had to go through the same process to be bought something expensive they want, say, a big screen TV.

    The same I suppose could be said of guitars.

  12. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    It takes a lot of work to be even able to play jazz shittily.
    Yes, this I can confirm first hand...
    I find this place a very valuable resource for playing/theory discussion. However, one person can show one concept in a single post that can send us to the shed for months or more. So I don't talk too much about the next concept while I am still drilling the last concept.

    Gear talk however is much less demanding of my time. I think to a large degree this is why the percentages look as they do.

  13. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick
    When we talk about gear is the only time we agree with each other.
    Guitars and Gear-48081f1c-ceb2-4730-9770-7c7719bcad26-jpg
    Last edited by grahambop; 02-13-2020 at 01:06 PM.

  14. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    I saw a pretty funny clip of a comedienne the other day where she talked about how if a woman wants something expensive, like say, a diamond ring, it's customary to have a relationship, fall in love, and have the guy buy it for you...she wondered aloud how funny it would be if guys had to go through the same process to be bought something expensive they want, say, a big screen TV.
    Facetious, fickle, flippant female:

    Her ring is not any object, but a symbol of union between people, on the basis of which (that union) lives are built, children are raised, etc.

    Also, if that is her chronology of event she is a monster. "I want a ring, I'll find someone to buy it for me, pretend to love him in return". Bah.

    And what when the ring is scratched or outmoded; does she put it by the rubbishbin with the old television? And who paid for BOTH? Right.

    I've 2 of those X somochromes myself, but loud vulgar women aren't "feminists" but hags, harpies, harridans, and I can't think of more Hs.

    Mr Beaumont: am not ranting against you, just dumb wimminz

  15. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zina
    Facetious, fickle, flippant female:

    Her ring is not any object, but a symbol of union between people, on the basis of which (that union) lives are built, children are raised, etc.

    Also, if that is her chronology of event she is a monster. "I want a ring, I'll find someone to buy it for me, pretend to love him in return". Bah.

    And what when the ring is scratched or outmoded; does she put it by the rubbishbin with the old television? And who paid for BOTH? Right.

    I've 2 of those X somochromes myself, but loud vulgar women aren't "feminists" but hags, harpies, harridans, and I can't think of more Hs.

    Mr Beaumont: am not ranting against you, just dumb wimminz
    No offesnse taken--but it was a comedy act...she was poking fun at all of it.

  16. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Guitars and Gear-48081f1c-ceb2-4730-9770-7c7719bcad26-jpg
    You win the internet today...


  17. #41

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    Actually those guys probably weren’t arguing about gear. Took me ages to google that picture, I’d seen it before but couldn’t remember any details. It shows a supposed ‘discussion’ between the followers of Carulli and Molino. Apparently the former said it was ok to use the left hand thumb over to fret bass notes, the latter said it was a no-no. So possibly they were fighting over technique!

  18. #42

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    Been looking at Treniers and Comins and other proper guitars for grown up jazz guitarists.

    the money you pay for one of these instruments is obviously no small amount (but still less than a top of the line cello or something, well ok maybe Benedetto is similar) but I feel that when I choose to have something like that made for me I’d like it to be more than a financial transaction. I get a feeling there should be a connection between player and instrument maker...

  19. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Been looking at Treniers and Comins and other proper guitars for grown up jazz guitarists.

    the money you pay for one of these instruments is obviously no small amount (but still less than a top of the line cello or something, well ok maybe Benedetto is similar) but I feel that when I choose to have something like that made for me I’d like it to be more than a financial transaction. I get a feeling there should be a connection between player and instrument maker...
    I play a Comins GCS-1 and had occasion to contact Bill Comins about it. He was great. If I were to have a guitar made for me I'd be very happy to have him do it.

    But, I'm scared to do it. One of the features I'd want is a very thin neck. But, I'd be concerned that I'd get a similarly thin sound and not like the guitar.

    How do players handle this sort of issue?

  20. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    I play a Comins GCS-1 and had occasion to contact Bill Comins about it. He was great. If I were to have a guitar made for me I'd be very happy to have him do it.

    But, I'm scared to do it. One of the features I'd want is a very thin neck. But, I'd be concerned that I'd get a similarly thin sound and not like the guitar.

    How do players handle this sort of issue?
    could swap you my late 60’s 175 haha? Or do you mean like thin as in depth?

  21. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    could swap you my late 60’s 175 haha? Or do you mean like thin as in depth?
    My favorite neck is on my Yamaha Pacifica 012, which is their cheapest instrument. It's thin in every dimension. Small nut width, thin back to front, and thin width at the higher frets. I find it very comfortable to play - feels great. There's a bit of trouble with certain grips (because things are so close together) but the advantages outweigh this problem. It's a 25.5" scale, but it feels smaller than the GCS-1.

    If I had a luthier build a guitar with those neck dimensions would it sound good?

    I did do something helpful with the GCS-1 which might be of interest to somebody. It comes from the factory with 11s, not sure of the low E but probably somewhere between 46 and 52. I went to a custom set, 11 13 16 (or 17) 24 32 42. Buy a set of 9-42, discard the 9 and add a 13. I didn't have to adjust the neck. I was concerned about tuning stability at first, but that settled in and is now okay. Intonation is fine. The advantage is that the action feels much softer. Since I don't like a lot of bass in my comping sound, I don't miss the thicker low strings. The top three strings aren't hugely different than the factory strings.

  22. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    One of the features I'd want is a very thin neck. But, I'd be concerned that I'd get a similarly thin sound and not like the guitar.
    Why? I have some guitars with fat necks and some with thin necks and I can see no such correlation. And a rosewood fretboard doesn't sound darker than a maple neck. That's just collector rubbish.
    A fat neck guitar could potentially take heavier string gauge, but you can still get fat tones using light strings. Medium gauge 11-52 should be fine on a thin neck.

  23. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCat
    Why? I have some guitars with fat necks and some with thin necks and I can see no such correlation. And a rosewood fretboard doesn't sound darker than a maple neck. That's just collector rubbish.
    A fat neck guitar could potentially take heavier string gauge, but you can still get fat tones using light strings. Medium gauge 11-52 should be fine on a thin neck.
    Interesting. Thanks for posting it. My thinner neck guitars tend to sound thinner. But, obviously, it could be due to another factor.

  24. #48

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    the Jacobacci Brothers had a reputation for very narrow, very thin and fast neck

    I saw one of the two, Roger, specialized in this problem, make the neck of my guitar with a two-handed wood chives [french plane de charron, varlope], an impressive show!






    in addition to the zero fret, for the sound of the open strings, they made very flat and soft frets on the neck, the fingers never hung
    fret zero

    I no longer use mine because the neck is too narrow for the chords played in fragments and the passage of the fingers of the right hand

    Last edited by Patlotch; 02-14-2020 at 05:33 AM.

  25. #49

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    Can you post a photo of it, please? I only learned of their existence a few days ago, and really like those guitars. They never made a non-cutaway, did they?

  26. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    Interesting. Thanks for posting it. My thinner neck guitars tend to sound thinner. But, obviously, it could be due to another factor.
    Rp, what's really important are the slots at nut and saddle for the treble strings as well as the bridge mechanical coupling from the string all the way to the top. When the slots are too wide or the bridge is not seated properly, treble strings sound thin. Light gauge strings require more precision in these areas. Also light gauge strings make less downforce on the bridge, so you may opt for an adjustable tailpiece to make a steeper break angle if required.

    Then pickup adjustment, a proper pick and a nice amp will provide glorious Jazz tones.