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  1. #101

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    My AR 605 tailpiece snapped also. The dealer sent me a replacement no charge. I don't know how the replacement is holding up. It is sitting in evidence at the police department. Stolen, recovered within hours, 3 years ago.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    Can't help noticing that most people that owned Eastmans liked them, but moved on at some point. Haven't owned one but have played a few. I think they are good value when bought used. Mostly acoustic archtop type sound and not so much electric.

  4. #103

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    About 20 years ago, I started noticing that many modern archtops were being voiced with a quite different tonal response than their counterparts from the 20s-70s. As I examined the carves of the top plates I noticed that the tops were considerably thinner near the f-holes than was the case with old Epiphone, Gibson, and D'Angelico instruments.

    The result seemed to be that the guitars I played in the 90s-00s (Andersen, Collins, Heritage, Eastman, Benedetto, etc.) all had brighter voices than the archtops of the 30s-40s. I thought about this and chalked it up to maybe the effort to grab new players whose experiences with acoustic guitars were formed exclusively around flattop Martin, Taylor, etc., guitars. It would make sense that someone raised on, say, a Martin D-18 would pick up an Andersen or an Eastman with bronze strings and think, "yeah, that's a nice guitar."

    By comparison, a Gibson L-5C still sounds roughly in the older archtop camp, even if it is of recent manufacture. (I do detect, however, a bit of the "new sound" in the Bozeman L-7C, FWIW.)

    I am not suggesting that one type of archtop is better than the other...only that there appears to have been a shift in the target sound that archtops are being carved for.

    Am I just hearing things, or do others sense what I am suggesting?

  5. #104

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    Hey Chyro,

    I've got an AR810CE that I just put on consignment last week at a local shop.
    I believe it will be listed on Reverb next week. I'll PM you some details.

  6. #105

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    I have had great luck with the Eastman acoustics I have bought on the used market. Good bang for the buck. And their customer service is very good as already stated here.

    I look forward to trying some of their arch tops in the future.

  7. #106

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    So I have owned several Eastman Archtop guitars over the years, including an 810CE,805CE,880JP,803CE, etc. I made the move to an Elferink Tonemaster which I love.
    But I just tried a non cutaway 810 mahogany model and was suitably impressed with both it's playability and warmth in sound. I do believe they keep improving their builds every year.And would definitely recommend them to those of us musicians on a limited budget.

  8. #107

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    Quote Originally Posted by DanielleOM
    I still have the original hinged tailpiece on my 2005 AR805CE. (It's living on borrowed time?)
    My 2005 had 13’s on it for 12 years without a problem. I wouldn’t worry about it. Fwiw, Jimmy D’Aquisto designed and made a bunch of tailpieces that failed.
    Last edited by whiskey02; 06-23-2019 at 12:55 AM.

  9. #108

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    I have a T145 that still has the original tailpiece, holding fine, and it has had relatively heavy strings for a long time. It is bright sounding, but it's a thinline, only 1.75" at the rims, so that's no surprise. I suspect Bob Benedetto had an influence on the top thickness of guitars beginning in the 80s and continuing. He was successful, and wrote the book, so that's no surprise. Top thickness is a subjective subject, and while it does make a difference in the sound, whether thinner or thicker is better is not universally agreed upon. There is a variety available, so one can buy whichever is preferred. Personally, I like the Benedetto pattern, and the thinner tops, particularly for acoustic playing. I think Eastmans sound pretty good amplified, but my taste is not the same as anyone else's. Eastmans certainly don't sound identical to L5s. Doh!

  10. #109

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    I play an ES175 and an Eastman AR910ce, two very different guitars, love them both. I do prefer the thin top and light weight of the Eastman, I play it more often. It does not "thunk" like my 175 but I would not describe it as brite, great tone acoustically and amplified imo.

  11. #110

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    I don't usually do this whole NGD thing, mostly because I don't want to come off as a show off. Where I come from it's really rude to boast about getting something new. But i'm starting to get the hang of this forum thing and I'm starting to see it as just us sharing our experiences with each other.

    So this is my first guitar purchase of this quality. I have a Loar LH-650 (black) as well, and I really thought that when I got it I had finally gotten a quality guitar. Not to say that The Loar makes bad guitars (I loved my Loar for the time) but this is definitely an awesome upgrade that I'm thankful for. And this time I got the guitar in the color I wanted. It was used, and has a few dings. But overall this thing is super sweet! It's so fun to play. I really thought the 17inch lower bout would have been way too big but I think this is the best feeling guitar I've ever played. At least in a REALLY long time.

    I heard such lovely things about Eastman archtops and now I realize why. I did need to intonate it when I got it, but that's no fault to Eastman. The dealer understandably loosened the strings before he sent it. Gonna throw a pack of my favorite strings on her in a little bit (pyramid golds).

    Of course I'm going to change the stock pickup for the Shadow Zoller that I have coming in the mail. I've heard such lovely things about it. The clarity. The tone. And I'm so excited to try it out on this baby. Anyways, without further ado, here she is. Sorry for the long post and the crappy pic.

    Does anyone else enjoy Eastman archtops? I really see the inspiration that they took from Benedetto in pieces like this. Also, does anyone else have any experience with the Zoller pickup? And one more question...Am I seriously the only person in the world who loves the True Vintage Pyramid Gold flats? I find them so lovely, and I love the extra tension.

    Eastman AR810CE-img_2745-copy-jpg

  12. #111

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    That's a beautiful guitar and I bet it sounds fantastic too! Congratulations on getting it! Eastman makes some great instruments. Lovely! Make some great sounds with her! And, don't worry about showing off such a beauty! We love looking at her!

  13. #112

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    Congrats! A good Eastman is a jewel. I had one for a few years and it was very acoustically alive. Just a brilliant crisp tone. All the best to you and enjoy your new instrument!

    Roli

  14. #113

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    Nice. But why "Of course I'm going to change the stock pickup"? You just got it, you need to spend some time with it before making a change like that I think. Go by what your ears tell you, not what you've read online. Absolutely nothing wrong with the pups on those guitars, especially when you have never used the Zoller that you're planning on installing. You're changing a pickup you haven't spent any serious time with, for something else you've never used. I have "upgraded" pickups that I had no problem or issue with in the hope of making my guitar "even better" and after spending the money, was less happy with the results.
    Enjoy you new guitar!

  15. #114

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    Eastman AR810CE-dfa2d5d0-ecd1-42b3-a52a-313204bef925-jpgEastman AR810CE-f10e27d9-22c6-4c4a-90bd-dba7272569ff-jpgEastman AR810CE-63f09e5b-24ea-4a35-a19e-804b1bb3792b-jpg

    I was on the Eastman bandwagon a long time ago. One day on eBay I was just searching ARCHTOP GUITAR and came across one in the $1100.00 range that just blew me absolutely away. It had no name on the headstock and no label inside. The seller is actually a member here. Back when I was married and always broke. I wrote the seller telling him I was in love with the guitar and if he'd hold it for me until November when I got my birthday check I'd pay him $1350.00 (or so) for it. It had THE MOST amazing woods. It was a dead wringer for a Benedetto Manhattan. I even got the seller to attach an older Benedetto pickup as part of the deal. Then I ran across another one in my waiting time. Turns out Eastman made an especially fine batch of the AR810 for their first NAMM show. The builder and partners scoured through their extensive wood stash for the best woods. The Builder, turns out none other than Mr. Wu... Eventually Eastman had their rep in Maryland locate some preforming artists and offered them one if they'd use it on stage. Eastman was born out of a company in China that made violas, violins and cellos and they approached Bob Benedetto to collaborate with them, he was too busy, told them to go buy his book. Well sh*t they did and replicated his Manhattan model. LOL Over time I saw three or four of these unbranded AR810s and the story was always the same, some rep GAVE them the guitar. Eastman didn't even have anyone with any engraving skills so there was no name on the headstock or inlays. They've come a long way. MY guitar turned out to be a real stunner and is really nice.

    The rub on the older models is they used a cheaper "designed by Kent Armstrong" floater that really isn't good at all. Nor are the electronics so don't be ashamed to say pursue a real american made Kent Armstrong, or say a neck mounted Bartolini 5j. BOY will you be surprised at how good it sounds plugged in. It's worth checking out...


    Big
    Last edited by BigMikeinNJ; 05-16-2020 at 06:42 PM.

  16. #115

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    Also... we'd like to see the back and rims please!

    (Eastman does have some really pretty maple)

  17. #116

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    Quote Originally Posted by whiskey02
    Nice. But why "Of course I'm going to change the stock pickup"? You just got it, you need to spend some time with it before making a change like that I think. Go by what your ears tell you, not what you've read online. Absolutely nothing wrong with the pups on those guitars, especially when you have never used the Zoller that you're planning on installing. You're changing a pickup you haven't spent any serious time with, for something else you've never used. I have "upgraded" pickups that I had no problem or issue with in the hope of making my guitar "even better" and after spending the money, was less happy with the results.
    Enjoy you new guitar!
    Well #1, I upgraded the pickup because I originally ordered the pickup for my Loar but decided to use it for my Eastman instead, and I'm really glad I did. Night and day difference between the pups. #2, it's the stock eastman pickup is the same stock pickup that that came with my loar except the kent that was on the eastman was gold instead of chrome. I'm very glad I changed the pups. No issues at all. Literally took me 5 minutes. Lol. But thanks for the advice, bud.

    EDIT: I wasn't trying to come off mean, btw. i'm glad you like the sound of the pickup. I personally didn't like the sound all that much. Don't worry, I had a whole day with it before my Zoller came in the mail behind it.

  18. #117

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    That s a beautiful guitar. I really like the x-braced Archtops from Eastman.
    Considering the pickup, I think the stock Kent Armstrong one is great and I had a lot of more expensive pickups on other archtops like dearmonds 1100 (original and the new one), an original 12 pole Armstrong one, a bartolini...
    It all depends on the sound you want to achieve. The stock pickup is very clear. I love this and I think it suits the guitar. It s not great if you want a fat Jazz sound (Montgomery). But in my opinion the guitar is in general not for this type of sound. The Zoller is warmer than the stock one, but not as clear.

    Only the pickups Eastman used in the first years (black plastic) were not as great in my opinion.

    Enjoy the guitar!

  19. #118

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    I loved my 810ce. It was an older model sunburst & it sang really well.
    The pick up was crap, but the guitar was great. Why did I sell?
    Only because my old L-7, plus I needed some $$$$.
    Heck, the old L-7 might be next on the chopping block.

  20. #119

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    If you search this forum for AR810CE you’ll find a few posts from me and others. I love mine.

    If your tailpiece has a hinge instead of a metal bend, watch it closely for cracks. If you see any evidence of metal fatigue, call Eastman customer service. You’ll find some posts and photos about that.

    Mine still has the old black Kent Armstrong pickup. I’ve been meaning to replace it with an adjustable pole piece pickup so I can even out the string-to-string response, but for this guitar I mostly use the pickup at low volumes to help fill out the acoustic sound, so it hasn’t been a priority.

    My AR810CE is surprisingly light for its size and the finish is a little delicate, but it’s held up well for 13 years.
    Last edited by KirkP; 05-27-2020 at 11:21 AM.

  21. #120

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    I hate to say it, but I much prefer the LH650 to the Eastman 810. But to each their own.

  22. #121

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop
    I hate to say it, but I much prefer the LH650 to the Eastman 810. But to each their own.
    Yes, to each their own, pal. I like the neck, size, and sound of the Eastman a lot better. I think the LH-650 is a little warmer. But it's not as pleasant sounding to my ear. The difference in the neck, though, is where I really like the Eastman. But like you said, to each their own. I think I'm actually going to sell my LH-650 here pretty soon. Having 2 archtops is a bit too much for me.

  23. #122

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    Anyone knows a good case for my Eastman AR810CE?

    I don't have the money to fork out for $1k+ custom 17inch archtop guitar case. The one I have is fine for the time being, but I'm about to install a new pickguard with some cool knobs on top vice the under-the-fingerrest thumbwheel. Just how I like it.

    Obviously this is gonna add about an inch to the width, so I'd like a case that is a little deeper. Is there such thing as a 17" archtop case that's around, say, 6 inches deep? I say that to take into account the back arch, front arch, floating Benedetto style finger rest, along with the volume & tone knobs. Am I really going to have to order custom. If so, I guess that's fine. I'll have to settle with saving my chips. Afterall, I'd rather spend the money protecting my investment vice having to get work done because my case was too small.

  24. #123

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    IMO, your best bet is to buy a 17" arched-top or double-arched "Montreal" case. These are typically made under the TKL label, and the company that provides them to TKL has been making them for 50+ years, and supplied cases to Gibson, Martin, Gretsch, Guild, and many more makers. This includes cases for 17" archtop guitars. There are a couple of trim levels based on hardware configuration, but the trim level really doesn't matter in terms of protecting the guitar. It's basically the same case they made for the Gibson L-5.
    Here are some typical examples:
    TKL black hard shell lined case for 17" Archtop guitars | Reverb
    TKL9120 17 Inch Archtop/Jumbo Guitar Case
    TKL 17 Inch Archtop/Jumbo Guitar Case 8820 || Guitar String Depot
    eBay
    TKL LTD™ Arch-Top Jumbo 6/12 String Guitar Case - TKL - World-Class Cases

    Another option is an Ameritage 17" case - these come in a "Silver" format and a "Gold" format - the only difference is that the Gold has an added humidification system.

    Another option is a Hiscox Liteflite "Pro II F-Jumbo (17") case, made in England. Hiscox makes a heavier, fancier, more expensive "Artist" version as well.

    Another option is a Cedar Creek case. - these are more expensive, heavier, and are excellent cases.

    I've had excellent experience with all of these cases and archtop guitars with floating pickups and knobs mounted to pickguards. The one key issue will be clearance for the knob or knobs poking up from the pickguard. That will depend on how high off the face of the guitar the guard is mounted, as well as the knob height.

    Another option is a relatively recently introduced Harptone case, from Cedar Creek/TKL/Harptone - not sure if they are doing a 17" archtop case yet, so I have not tried one for fit.

    The main hassle with all these cases is the shipping cost - they are large/oversized, and shipping cost is not based on weight but on size ("dimensional weight").

    All of these cases should be available for somewhere in the $300-$500 range (but the Cedar Creek ones might be more). I'd buy from an experienced on-line retailer like Elderly Instruments, who know archtop guitars well, and sell a lot of cases, and discuss the dimensional specifics with them before deciding on a specific case.
    Guitar Cases & Gigbags – Elderly Instruments

    You can have a similar conversation with Gruhn or Carter Vintage in Nashville - they do a lot of archtop business, and are a lot closer (less costly shipping). Another option is to find a used case, typically an old Harptone or old TKL/Montreal case, that previously housed an old Guild or Gibson 17" archtop. Gruhn or Carter Vintage might be more likely to have a used case for less $$$. No idea if there are any local NOLA retailers with archtop experience.

    At the end of the day, if none of that works, you can get a custom Calton or similar high-end case. IMO a Calton is useful if you travel by air with the guitar, otherwise, I think it's serious overkill.
    Last edited by Hammertone; 05-18-2020 at 02:52 AM.

  25. #124

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    Congrats on your new Eastman - I’ve owned a few 910’s and they are fine guitars - do enjoy. The blondes are gorgeous.

  26. #125

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    Are you sure the one you already have won't clear the knobs? Are you putting on smaller knobs, or full-size knobs?

    Just lay the guitar in the case, scotch tape something similar in height to the knobs on the guard, and see if it closes ok.

  27. #126

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    Yes I'm sure I'm going to need a deeper case. Right now my box has thumbwheels beneath the pickup, and it's barely deep enough as it is. It closes but I can feel there is very little give. I have full size knobs that i'm going to put on. My case that I have now is about 4 1/2 inches (internal dimensions). I found a deeper case though thanks to the above comment by @hammertone.

  28. #127

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone

    Another option is an Ameritage 17" case - these come in a "Silver" format and a "Gold" format - the only difference is that the Gold has an added humidification system.
    Just a warning about Ameritage: While they are awesome cases, they are quite heavy to carry.

  29. #128

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    The highest part of the guitar is the bridge. If the pickguard isn't hitting the top of the case now, the knobs probably won't hit it when installed. There's a lot more room in there than there appears to be, and if you get a deeper case, and the bridge doesn't touch the top, the guitar will move around when you tilt it, and you risk damage to the guitar, either the top or the neck. The fit should be tight, both the sides and the top/bottom, but the fit of the top and bottom is actually more important IMO.

  30. #129

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    Hey thanks for the reply to my post. Actually, I have another guitar that came stock with a volume knob on the pickguard and the button is higher than the bridge by a long shot, and this will most likely be the case when I get done replacing the pickguard and putting the knobs on the pickguard on my Eastman.

    EDIT: Also with my last guitar, the knob was definitely getting pressed down when I closed my case which caused a few problems.
    Last edited by broturtel; 05-18-2020 at 08:55 PM.

  31. #130

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    Here are the backs and sides as promised. Along with the Zoller pickup installed. I gotta say, I LOVE how it sounds. But I also love how freaking flat it is. It also helps that the fretboard is lifted way above the body vice not having enough space for anything besides a johnny smith on the vintage style neck of the Loar I have.

    Has anyone else ever gotten a guitar who's backs didn't have matching pieces. For me, they're literally 2 different tones of maple wood. Obviously, I'm not a person who cares. Idc how much I pay for a guitar, wood is natural. I'm not asking someone to make me a perfect anything. But I do find it a bit funny considering I've never seen a guitar like this. Well, whatever. It sounds amazing. I'll post some sound clips too when I get a chance.

    Eastman AR810CE-img_2805-jpgEastman AR810CE-img_2803-jpgEastman AR810CE-img_2804-jpgEastman AR810CE-4b96c240-b198-4cf6-9ddc-e56426180e16-jpg

  32. #131

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    I think you’ll see that the back is two matched pieces if you look at it in the right light. Sometimes the grain of one side picks up more light than the other because the grain is literally going the opposite direction. But you can see it in the mirror image grain near the bottom. That is a book-matched maple back.

  33. #132

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    Yes I see the grains! I didn't know that one side could pick up more light though. I've never heard of anything like that or seen it. Either way, the wood is still beautiful IMO.

  34. #133

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    Quote Originally Posted by broturtel
    Yes, to each their own, pal. I like the neck, size, and sound of the Eastman a lot better. I think the LH-650 is a little warmer. But it's not as pleasant sounding to my ear. The difference in the neck, though, is where I really like the Eastman. But like you said, to each their own. I think I'm actually going to sell my LH-650 here pretty soon. Having 2 archtops is a bit too much for me.
    It's my belief that the LH650 truly comes alive with a pickup swap. I'd not judge the guitar without doing one. I used a Bartolini 5J pickup in that guitar and it came alive. What are you asking for yours?

  35. #134

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    Quote Originally Posted by rolijen
    I think you’ll see that the back is two matched pieces if you look at it in the right light. Sometimes the grain of one side picks up more light than the other because the grain is literally going the opposite direction. But you can see it in the mirror image grain near the bottom. That is a book-matched maple back.
    Here's a photo of a guitar with a bookmatched back, taken to highlight that effect.

  36. #135

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    Bear with me and my tired old eyes - if you’re the guy looking for a case to accommodate putting knobs on your pickguard
    tske it to tech snd have him replace the cheap hidden controls with Schatten hidden controls. I’ve done this many times with drastic improvement in volume and tone control sensitivity and sound .
    heck even Mark Campellone switched to schsttens on guitars with pickguard controls

    good luck


  37. #136

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop
    It's my belief that the LH650 truly comes alive with a pickup swap. I'd not judge the guitar without doing one. I used a Bartolini 5J pickup in that guitar and it came alive. What are you asking for yours?
    Not sure yet! And also, I guess when I compare guitar sounds (archtops) i'm usually refering to acoustic properties. Put a good pickup on almost anything it comes alive. But to my ear, acoustically the Eastman is more rich.

  38. #137

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    Quote Originally Posted by BigMikeinNJ
    Bear with me and my tired old eyes - if you’re the guy looking for a case to accommodate putting knobs on your pickguard
    tske it to tech snd have him replace the cheap hidden controls with Schatten hidden controls. I’ve done this many times with drastic improvement in volume and tone control sensitivity and sound .
    heck even Mark Campellone switched to schsttens on guitars with pickguard controls

    good luck

    Hey there Mike. I did this with my Loar LH-650. They work really well, but quite honestly I just like having the controls on the pickguard. I don't like the thumbwheels. I thought I would, but I don't.

  39. #138

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    Regarding your preference in tone between the Loar and the Eastman, one is 16 inches and the other 17, the scale lengths are also different, one 24'75, the other 25" (if I'm not mistaken).. So they're not really exactly comparable.
    I'm interested in your thoughts on the necks
    Why do you prefer the neck on the Eastman? Is it less chunky or something?
    I'm searching for my real first all solid archtop, and a I have these two guitars on sale not too far from me, won't be able to try the two, so l'm trying to find every useful information.

  40. #139

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jx30510
    Regarding your preference in tone between the Loar and the Eastman, one is 16 inches and the other 17, the scale lengths are also different, one 24'75, the other 25" (if I'm not mistaken).. So they're not really exactly comparable.
    I'm interested in your thoughts on the necks
    Why do you prefer the neck on the Eastman? Is it less chunky or something?
    I'm searching for my real first all solid archtop, and a I have these two guitars on sale not too far from me, won't be able to try the two, so l'm trying to find every useful information.
    Oh yeah, they're two TOTALLY different builds as far as guitars go. The Loar is also about half an inch deeper than the Eastman. Different scale lengths, different construction as well. The Loar has a vintage neck angle which makes it more difficult to fit floating pickups there unless they're mini floaters (johnny smith style).

    Well, as far as why I like the Eastman more it's for a few different reasons. The first reason is the neck, like you mentioned. The Loar has a vintage V style neck. So it's more clunky. Don't get me wrong, it's still comfortable. But the Eastman has a C profile neck if I'm not mistaken. Maybe I'm wrong here. Definitely less clunky. Same nut width of 1.75". The scale length is also longer like you said on the Eastman. Which may not be for everyone. There is a bit more tension. Also the Loar does have a more vintage sound as that's the style they're going for. Eastman on the other hand kind of copied the Benedetto style of guitars. I've never played a Benedetto so I can't compare the sound to it. Obviously the Eastman is definitely louder. It's not as warm, though. It's a bit more clear. But not as clear and focused as perhaps other archtops in the 16" category. All in all, the Eastman is MY preference. SO many people like the Loar LH-650 more. I like big bodies. I'm a small guy but I have monkey arms. Long as heck. Don't just take my word for it though. Try and play some different archtops if you can. If you can't, do PLENTY of research. Watch comparison videos or videos where people demo the sounds of different archtops. And for brands like Loar and Eastman, look at the guitars they copy. The Loar copies the Gibson L-4C while the Eastman copies the Benedetto. Obviously more expensive instruments so I'm not saying those are the ones you have to go for, just look and see what kind of sound and construction they're meaning to imitate. And lurk around on these forums too. See what's worked for others looking for the sound you're looking for. Sound and feel are both really important. I used to think that maybe sound was more important. it totally is important, but how a guitar feels in your hands is important too. Don't settle. I was settling when I bought the Loar because I wanted something cheaper than others. Lucky for me it turned out to be a nice guitar, but in retrospect I wish (for my preferences only) that I had gotten an eastman from the get-go. Because I would have already had the sound and feel I wanted all along. Remember that opinions and preferences are just that. Don't take guitar comparisons or preferences for what you should want or like. Search for the sound and style that inspires you because if you don't, you'll be stuck with something that doesn't make you happy, and you'll spend even more money trying to get what does. There are some people who can pick up any guitar and love it. And that doesn't make them better or worse. It's just how they play. Make sure you know what you want if you want something specific. Also, message me if you have any direct questions about my experience so far with either guitar. Here's a picture of them side-by-side btw. sorry for the wires all out on the Loar. I just put a tone knob in and i'm waiting on a new pickguard.

    Eastman AR810CE-img_2806-jpg

  41. #140

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    Any chance u could post up some playing with the eastman?

  42. #141

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    I have an Eastman AR810CE. Does have that usual hex wrench truss rod. What size is this bolt so that I can get the proper tool to adjust it with.

    Thanks so much for all your help!

  43. #142

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    This one fits my Eastman. Not the same model guitar, but I think they use the same truss rod in everything.
    5/16 Truss Rod Wrench Fits Gibson, ESP ect. Luthier Guitar Tool Ships From U.S. | eBay

  44. #143

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    This one fits my Eastman. Not the same model guitar, but I think they use the same truss rod in everything.
    5/16 Truss Rod Wrench Fits Gibson, ESP ect. Luthier Guitar Tool Ships From U.S. | eBay
    Thank you so much! Which model Eastman do you have if you don't mind me asking.

  45. #144

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    Quote Originally Posted by Irwin1993
    Any chance u could post up some playing with the eastman?
    Hey there! Sorry it took me so long to get back to this. Anyways, I recorded some demos today. The mic is just a $50 condensor mic, but it does the job. The pickup is direct input into my Scarlette 2i2. No effects used, just straight DI. Then I also recorded some with the DI + Mic and also using a Bios Amp sim. The amp is called "Jazz Tone for Solid" by Yoshikazu Shimizu. Also included a recording of the amp sim + mic.

    Mic Only:


    Entire Playlist:
    Shimmer (Eastman AR810CE sound demos) by Bro. Turtel | Free Listening on SoundCloud

  46. #145

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    I have a T145. It's an older thinline carved spruce hollowbody.

  47. #146

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    I never heard of buying ONE Allen wrench - they usually come in sets. Also, your Eastman may be metric instead of SAE.

  48. #147

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    It doesn't use an Allen wrench. It has a hex nut on the end, which needs a wrench. The one in the link has a socket on one end, and a Phillips screwdriver on the other, for removing the truss rod cover screws. Lots of truss rods have hex nuts instead of Allen sockets.

  49. #148

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skip Ellis
    I never heard of buying ONE Allen wrench - they usually come in sets. Also, your Eastman may be metric instead of SAE.
    Not always true. I've bought a single allen key truss rod wrench in the past for a past guitar. Also, the Eastman is actually a 5/16" hex as stated above! Thanks for the reply!

    Regards
    BT

  50. #149

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    I have a T145. It's an older thinline carved spruce hollowbody.
    Oh nice! Btw, you were correct. Picked up a multi-tool from GC today (I needed the other tools anyway) and the 5/16" worked. So thank you so much!

  51. #150

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    Eastman read the Benedetto book and followed it faithfully. Benedetto uses the same truss rod, or at least the same style. The same wrench that came with one of my Benedettos fits my Eastman perfectly.