Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Posts 1 to 50 of 143
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    So I've been getting curious to learn the real changes to the original tune. I found this on youtube.



    Anyone know if this is THE original? I thought there were lyrics. Beautiful lyrics. The chord changes here are so much prettier than the real book... but I'm not sure it's the original since it's instrumental. Anyone have any idea?

    Also... get a load of those changes!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    Stella was written as an instrumental by Victor Young for the 1944 film The Uninvited. Ned Washington wrote lyrics for it in 1946. Harry James had a hit with it in 1947, and a little later that year Frank Sinatra had a bigger hit. Charlie Parker is said to have done the first jazz version in 1952. Stan Getz and others followed soon thereafter.

    So, in short, the film version is the original. But, perhaps, the original jazz changes could be traced to Bird and the other early jazz recordings.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Yeah, those are the original changes. It was originally done in G.
    The boppers changed the i diminished it starts out on to a ii V.
    All the pop music back then originally sounded like Tchaikovsky, with a lot of harmony from the Romantic Era.

    You can still hear some early versions by people like Red Norvo and Tony Mottolla that use those changes.
    Check out "Red Norvo in Hi Fi".

    Back when there were still a lot of gigs around, guys would play those changes out of Fake Book #1, the first fake book.
    The lyrics start off something like, "The song a robin sings" etc...
    The bridge goes, "A great symphonic theme, that's Stella by starlight, without a dream."
    The last line is, She's everything, on earth to me.'

    Green Dolphin Street was also from a movie of the same name.
    Most of the tunes were from some movie or show.

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Elliott View Post
    Stella was written as an instrumental by Victor Young for the 1944 film The Uninvited. Ned Washington wrote lyrics for it in 1946. Harry James had a hit with it in 1947, and a little later that year Frank Sinatra had a bigger hit. Charlie Parker is said to have done the first jazz version in 1952. Stan Getz and others followed soon thereafter.

    So, in short, the film version is the original. But, perhaps, the original jazz changes could be traced to Bird and the other early jazz recordings.
    Great history lesson Stuart, thanks. I didn't know the chronological timeline. I just assumed that the lyrics were written for, and sung in, the movie that first showcased the tune. Interesting to find out they were added later.

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim View Post
    Yeah, those are the original changes. It was originally done in G.
    The boppers changed the i diminished it starts out on to a ii V.
    All the pop music back then originally sounded like Tchaikovsky, with a lot of harmony from the Romantic Era.

    You can still hear some early versions by people like Red Norvo and Tony Mottolla that use those changes.
    Check out "Red Norvo in Hi Fi".

    Back when there were still a lot of gigs around, guys would play those changes out of Fake Book #1, the first fake book.
    The lyrics start off something like, "The song a robin sings" etc...
    The bridge goes, "A great symphonic theme, that's Stella by starlight, without a dream."
    The last line is, She's everything, on earth to me.'

    Green Dolphin Street was also from a movie of the same name.
    Most of the tunes were from some movie or show.
    Thanks SG, I'll check out Red Norvo too.

    I knew different guys played it in G, but honestly, I've never had anyone call it at a gig or session in G. And I'm not sure that it was originally in G. The recording I posted above (which I assume is the original??) is in Bb for one chorus, and then it modulates up to D (I didn't transcribe the whole thing. I only listened to get the original chords from the Bb section and then listened enough to hear it move into D... it might do something different towards the end).

    The Sinatra version was in G. And the Bird version was back in Bb (may have changed keys during the 2nd chorus again like the original, need to give it a proper listen).

    What's interesting is that I'd heard about the Dbdim instead of the E-7b5 A7 at the beginning a while back, but there are a couple of other differences that are pretty nice in the original... and the Sinatra version and the Bird version both are still using that older version.

    And yeah, those are the lyrics... they're really beautiful.


  7. #6
    destinytot Guest
    I love the sound of Do Mi Sol Do (Sol Mi Do) transitioning to Do Me Se Ti (Se Me Do) at the top of the tune: "The song..." (An F# triad with a G bass?)

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim View Post
    The lyrics start off something like, "The song a robin sings" etc...
    The bridge goes, "A great symphonic theme, that's Stella by starlight, without a dream."
    The last line is, She's everything, on earth to me.'
    ... and I always thought it was a Belgian drinking song !
    Have no secrets, hear no lies.

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jordanklemons View Post
    Thanks SG, I'll check out Red Norvo too.

    I knew different guys played it in G, but honestly, I've never had anyone call it at a gig or session in G. And I'm not sure that it was originally in G. The recording I posted above (which I assume is the original??) is in Bb for one chorus, and then it modulates up to D (I didn't transcribe the whole thing. I only listened to get the original chords from the Bb section and then listened enough to hear it move into D... it might do something different towards the end).

    The Sinatra version was in G. And the Bird version was back in Bb (may have changed keys during the 2nd chorus again like the original, need to give it a proper listen).

    What's interesting is that I'd heard about the Dbdim instead of the E-7b5 A7 at the beginning a while back, but there are a couple of other differences that are pretty nice in the original... and the Sinatra version and the Bird version both are still using that older version.

    And yeah, those are the lyrics... they're really beautiful.

    Tal and Jimmy Raney played it in G, and it's in G in Fake Book #1, so everybody did it in G back then.

    Many of the songs in the Real Book use Bill Evans changes. A good example is "My Foolish Heart", which was a I vi ii V before Bill and Scott La Faro resurrected it.
    I used to call it on gigs with some older cats on organ, and i couldn't believe it when I heard Bb Gm Cm F7, instead of what Bill Evans played.
    There's a recording of Bill and Scott rehearsing it for the first time, trying out a bunch of different things.
    Bucky Pizzarelli thinks you should use the songs original changes, but I go along with Bill Evans' view that you have to change a tune to make it most logical for blowing on it.

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim View Post
    Bucky Pizzarelli thinks you should use the songs original changes, but I go along with Bill Evans' view that you have to change a tune to make it most logical for blowing on it.
    And one can play the head with one set of changes then switch to another set for blowing over....
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Well whatever they are, if you're not playing the original "it's ridiculous".


    A little BH humor...

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by vintagelove View Post
    Well whatever they are, if you're not playing the original "it's ridiculous".


    A little BH humor...
    Quote Originally Posted by newsense View Post
    ... and I always thought it was a Belgian drinking song !
    STEEEEEELLLLLAAAAAAA!!!

    More like late 90s Britain on a Saturday night.

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    Just for the sake of trivia, it's also featured throughout the movie "The Nutty Professor" (the Jerry Lewis one) as a theme for the actress Stella Stevens, whose character is also named Stella in the film.
    Last edited by pubylakeg; 03-17-2016 at 02:14 PM.

  14. #13
    destinytot Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by vintagelove View Post
    Well whatever they are, if you're not playing the original "it's ridiculous".


    A little BH humor...
    That made me laugh! I could almost hear the quality and contour of his voice...

    (Not that my doing so is of any consequence, but) I'm happy to indulge the views of certain seniors out of affection, admiration and respect. And in my book, BH gets extra leeway because of who he is.

    But I also laugh because I see some truth in it. I think it's great when ideas fly - but I think it's ridiculous to expect gravity to indulge any kind of license.

  15. #14
    You know for me, it's less important to play what's best to improvise on and more important to play what, to my ear, sounds the prettiest. I think a handful of years ago, I'd be all over what's easiest, most fun, and most logical for blowing... but right now, my priorities are just changing... and I'm more concerned with playing something pretty. Sometimes that means not improvising at all. Sometimes it means improvising but just doing so around the melody. Sometimes it means actually blowing.

    Either way, for me right now, it seems not possible for me to be able to make conscious and logical choices about what I want until I figure out where it all started. That gives me an idea of where the tune actually came from, and it helps me put Bill Evans and other guys changes into perspective that makes sense.

    I heard that Peter Bernstein used to go to the NYC library to look up the original published sheet music for all the old standards. He wanted to know what the composer actually wrote down... the chords and the phrasing for the melody. He felt that if you learned a tune ONLY by listening to Miles or Monk or whoever, that you would only at best be learning their version. Your version would just be an arrangement of their version. Whereas if you went to the original, then you could actually come up with an arrangement that was your own. I think learning from others is great... but there's something so personal and deep about going to the source and finding your own way to develop that.

    At least, that's where I'm currently at.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    Lately I've taken to seeking out the original popular or show versions of standards. I'd like to know the original interpretation of the tune before the jazz guys started reharmonizing it.

    I won't necessarily play it in the original form, but I feel the process will give me a deeper feel for the song and might free me to interpret the tune in my own way rather than being locked into a fake book.

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Well this has inspired me to transcribe those chords off the OP. Care to compare notes, JK?
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  18. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Well this has inspired me to transcribe those chords off the OP. Care to compare notes, JK?
    Sure man. Check it out and see what you get. Then let me know and we can compare. They're pretty similar. I only found a couple differences.

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    So I just ran through the bass notes here at lunch...this seems like this is going to be the most interesting differences...lots of great half step/whole step movement...
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  20. #19
    Right? That's what I noticed too. Really pretty bass movement.

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    It makes for beautiful "drama."

    I get why the changes were "bopped" for turning this into a jazz tune...but I think I'm going to revamp the way I play this solo and stick closer to this version, at least for the melody. Really puts the "pretty" back into the tune...it also inspires me to play it sloooooowwwwwweeeerrrrr...

    Anyway, here's my rough take on the changes. I'm certain there's mistakes, and I may have named a few things weird...I'll be going back tomorrow for another listen.

    | Dbdim7 | Dbdim7| C- (11) | F7 F7b9 |
    |F-9 | Bb13 | Eb | Eb Ab7 |
    | Bbmaj7 | G-6 | D-7 | Bb-6/Db |
    | F/C | Bbdim | A-7b5 | D7b9 |
    | G7+ | G7+ | C- | C- |
    | Eb-/maj13 | Eb-/maj13 | Bb/D | Bb/D |
    | Dbdim7 | Dbdim7 | Bb-6/Ab | G7b9 |
    | Cm7b5 | F7 | Bb | Bb |

    A few edits, 3/21/16

    Edits to come...
    Last edited by mr. beaumont; 03-20-2016 at 11:48 AM.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    Bass movement was more of a big deal back when bassists didn't improvise so much.

    When they started walking they needed more freedom - is this perhaps part of the reason why bop changes made everything more ii V based?

  23. #22
    destinytot Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Really puts the "pretty" back into the tune...it also inspires me to play it sloooooowwwwwweeeerrrrr...
    Nice.

  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    In graduate school, I took a class in the History of musical theater.
    The most interesting thing I got out of it was that most of the standards from the 20s,30s and 40s came out of Operetta, so the the guys that wrote the tunes were actually composers who were trained in the European tradition of harmony and melody from the 19th Century Romantic Period (1820-1900) composers.
    Jerome Kern was a good example of a guy that hated jazz, and especially hated jazz musicians playing his tunes.
    At one point, he actually would refuse to let jazz musicians record his songs, but then he croaked, and them dope-crazed jazzers started re-harmonizing and improvising on ATTYA and all his other great stuff, causing Jerry to roll over in his grave...

    It is cool to know the original changes, so you can understand the thought processes of geniuses like Bill evans in (as he put it) changing the architecture of a song.

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    Did a quick run through with the old changes...it's pretty like this. Gonna play around with it more.

    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  26. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Did a quick run through with the old changes...it's pretty like this. Gonna play around with it more.
    That's lovely. I might have to try and steal that. (all I can do is try to play other people's arrangements)

  27. #26

    User Info Menu

    Great work guys, I'm going to have a look at those old changes too, very interesting.

    :: Jazz, Funk, Soul & Boogaloo: My group ::
    ::::::: Listen to Hip Jazz a Go Go! :::::::
    :: Jazz, Soul, Blues: Eva & The Tracies :::

  28. #27

    User Info Menu

    I find that a lot of tunes get played in Bb even when that's not the original key. Straight No Chaser and But Not For Me come to mind immediately. Most people think Straight No Chaser was recorded in Bb, but it was recorded in F.

    I'm sure there are many other examples.

  29. #28

    User Info Menu

    I think my next step will be to transpose.

    Part of me would like to turn this into a slick "plectrum guitar" type of arrangement...

    I know, coming from the guy who doesn't like arrangements.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  30. #29

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny View Post
    I find that a lot of tunes get played in Bb even when that's not the original key. Straight No Chaser and But Not For Me come to mind immediately. Most people think Straight No Chaser was recorded in Bb, but it was recorded in F.

    I'm sure there are many other examples.
    I don't think I've ever heard or played Straight No Chaser in anything other than F, but I don't get around much anymore.

    John

  31. #30

    User Info Menu

    Funny, when couple of months ago I wondered about validity of that Em7b5 ... people told me I was deaf and dumb, only in quite wordier, Jazz connoisseur patronizing, way.
    On same occasion I advocated working from original is the way to go, making your own Jazz version, as opposed to working from someone else's Jazz version.

    Glad to find similar ideas being so well accepted, now, by, generally, all the same crowd of people ...
    ^ ^ ^
    <<< My BlogSpot Page >>>
    v v v

  32. #31

    User Info Menu

    Well, people might have treated strangely if you questioned the "validity" of an Em7b5, because there's a 1,000 jazz versions out there that use just that. It's a reharmonization. It's absolutely valid.

    These original chords are cool, but I'd be the one treated strangely if I played these instead of the agreed upon "blowing" changes.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  33. #32

    User Info Menu

    Mr. B., you can read better than this. It was not validity of Em7b5, but validith of "that (particular) Em7b5", but whatever, I'm glad Jordan brought it up.

    Just to let you know before he delete it and ban me for no reason and fabricated inappropriate language, which I never used, a PM from worthless piece of moderator and my response ...

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    Dear Vladan,

    You have received an infraction at The Jazz Guitar Forum.

    Reason: Inappropriate Language
    -------
    If you want to report a post, do it the way everyone else does.

    If you want to complain to the site administrator about my moderation, please do.


    -------

    This infraction is worth 1 point(s) and may result in restricted access until it expires. Serious infractions will never expire.

    All the best,
    The Jazz Guitar Forum

    Inappropriate language?! Where? Quote, please. You're so pathetic.
    ^ ^ ^
    <<< My BlogSpot Page >>>
    v v v

  34. #33

    User Info Menu

    Looks like you're pissed off about something and now you're taking it out on me.

    I can only read what's there in text. Maybe a link to the post where you questioned the chord in particular?
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  35. #34

    User Info Menu

    Mr. B, I'm not pissed, not taking on you, sorry if it came out that way. Just wanted to say, everything is in context, so if I write about something in context of this thread, which is about first 2, or so chords changes from Stella .... and I spoke about it in practical standards thread. I don't say it's same idea, I say it's similar, probably coming from hearing similar stuff ...
    ^ ^ ^
    <<< My BlogSpot Page >>>
    v v v

  36. #35

    User Info Menu

    When I'm studying a tune, there several ways of looking at the changes:
    1) As played in early popular recordings
    2) As written in early (pop-oriented) books
    3) As played in classic jazz recordings (e.g., swing era)
    4) As played in modern jazz recordings
    5) As written in modern fake books
    6) Vanilla changes (minimalist changes based on the melody)
    I don't claim to be very methodical about it, but I feel I get to know a tune more deeply if I study it from more than one of those aspects. Of course the ultimate objective is to internalize and make the tune your own, as mr. beaumont is doing.

  37. #36

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim View Post
    In graduate school, I took a class in the History of musical theater.
    The most interesting thing I got out of it was that most of the standards from the 20s,30s and 40s came out of Operetta, so the the guys that wrote the tunes were actually composers who were trained in the European tradition of harmony and melody from the 19th Century Romantic Period (1820-1900) composers.
    Jerome Kern was a good example of a guy that hated jazz, and especially hated jazz musicians playing his tunes.
    At one point, he actually would refuse to let jazz musicians record his songs, but then he croaked, and them dope-crazed jazzers started re-harmonizing and improvising on ATTYA and all his other great stuff, causing Jerry to roll over in his grave...
    I can imagine his frustration. He pours his soul into creating what he feels is perfection, then the jazz guys gut his work of art, leaving little intact but the melody. From his perspective it might be akin to slicing up the Mona Lisa to make cubist art. :-)

  38. #37

    User Info Menu

    i mentioned here in a thread somewhere
    that Peter Bernstein (and Barry Harris i believe) saying the first chord
    of Stella in Bb is Bb dim (=Db dim)

    No-one jumped on me then

    ps anyone else dig Gbminmaj7 at bar 8 ?
    Last edited by pingu; 03-18-2016 at 02:47 PM.

  39. #38

    User Info Menu

    After figuring out the whole thing, that's my favorite change. Starting a song on a diminished chord is just too cool.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  40. #39

    User Info Menu

    There a tendency in jazz reharmonization to change what were originally dim7 chords into 7b9 chords, based on the idea that when you remove the root from a 7b9 chord what's left is a dim7 chord rooted 1/2 step higher. Another tendency is to precede dominants chords by a dominant or minor chord a fifth up.

    So in Stella, two bars of Bbdim7 becomes Emin7b5, A7b9. There's nothing wrong with that. It's hip and might be easier to solo over, but it changes the bass line among other things. I like having the option to play it with the original changes, especially for playing solo.
    Last edited by KirkP; 03-18-2016 at 04:47 PM.

  41. #40

    User Info Menu

    Did another run, in the key of G this time. Granted, nylon string makes everything more romantic, but I really enjoy what I'm finding in this old tune.

    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  42. #41

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Did another run, in the key of G this time. Granted, nylon string makes everything more romantic, but I really enjoy what I'm finding in this old tune.
    Nice!
    (You also demonstrated why transposing to a "guitar friendly" key isn't a sin -- as discussed in another thread.)

  43. #42

    User Info Menu

    Thanks!
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  44. #43

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jordanklemons View Post
    So I've been getting curious to learn the real changes to the original tune. I found this on youtube.



    Anyone know if this is THE original? I thought there were lyrics. Beautiful lyrics. The chord changes here are so much prettier than the real book... but I'm not sure it's the original since it's instrumental. Anyone have any idea?

    Also... get a load of those changes!
    Here's a chart - BTW Jordan - did you check out the December standards thing? Can't remember if you posted there- I did stick up this chart and a link IRC to that film clip.
    Last edited by MarkRhodes; 03-19-2016 at 03:10 PM. Reason: copyright violation

  45. #44

    User Info Menu

    Cool, some stuff I heard, some stuff I didnt, and a few things I don't agree with, but cool.

    Ebm/maj7 sound in bar 21, of course!!! What was I hearing?
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  46. #45
    destinytot Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Here's a chart - BTW Jordan - did you check out the December standards thing? Can't remember if you posted there- I did stick up this chart and a link IRC to that film clip.

    Attachment 29493
    Who wrote this comparison, please?

  47. #46

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    After figuring out the whole thing, that's my favorite change. Starting a song on a diminished chord is just too cool.
    It would have been more novel if it hadn't already been done in "Spring Is Here".
    SBS took longer than other songs of that period to be taken up by jazz musicians. Other than Red Norvo, very few Swing players played it.
    The boppers were the first to adopt it, but I wonder who was responsible for ditching the beginning diminished chord for the bVmin7b5 chord?
    Bird might have played it as a ballad with the Bird With Strings LP, but he never played it in a small group.
    The earliest recorded version that used that change that I know of, was The Jimmy Raney/Phil Woods 'Early Quintet' LP in 1956.
    That pre-dated the Miles Davis version and the Tal version by a few years.
    Anybody know any earlier version?

  48. #47

    User Info Menu

    This is a really interesting discussion because it overlaps with a conversation that has gone on for centuries in, of all things, THEOLOGY and BIBLE, not to mention literature.

    What is there relationship between a work of art's "meaning" and features as endowed by the original producer, on the one hand, and what became of that work of art, how it was received, interpreted, used, etc. in subsequent generations. Is the "author's meaning" the one and only meaning, and others are wrong? Is the author merely the one who tossed the piece of art into the river of history and culture, losing control of it almost from the moment of its creation? Is the author's view of the work of art the only legitimate one, the one to which also others must hold?

    And related: to what extent is the outward form, or the features, of the work of art fixed in the form in which the artist placed them. So Michelangelo created gaudy, brightly colored frescos that yellowed over time with age... and the yellowed, discolored ones became the "canonical" version. When they were cleaned, restoring their brilliant colors, many people were appalled! Many accepted versions of literary works and poems have substantial sections that differ from what the original author or artist created. Should they be revised back to the "original" form or celebrated as fresh fruit, signs of the vitality of the work of art?

    Those are just a few of the kinds of questions that people who work in the history of art, literature, and even scripture find themselves asking; and they might even be pertinent, in an admittedly much more light-handed sense, for our thoughts and considerations here.

    Professor's hat removed, back on peg. I'm hittin' the head...
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  49. #48
    dortmundjazzguitar Guest

  50. #49

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Here's a chart - BTW Jordan - did you check out the December standards thing? Can't remember if you posted there- I did stick up this chart and a link IRC to that film clip.

    We can't post charts here from the Real Book or other publications protected by copyright.
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  51. #50

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim View Post
    That's an interesting subject that was taken up by William Gaddis in his mammoth first novel, The 'Recognitions', which dealt with the
    theme of originality in both Art and Religion. Bucky Pizzarelli is a firm believer in the supremacy of the original songwriter's version, as evidenced by the stories of two students who studied with Bucky.
    In their first lesson, they were asked to play one of their solo versions of a tune.
    When they played a version with many chord subs, Bucky roasted them for not knowing and/or using the original changes of the tunes. He has mentioned this several times in books and interviews; criticizing musicians for corrupting the intent of the composer of the song.
    I listened to the Bird With Strings version, and they play it at a medium tempo, but they use the i diminished chord, each time that maj7th in the melody comes up.
    I was obsessed with this tune for many years when I first heard it as a kid.
    I sought to exorcise its demonic possession of my mind by composing my own contrafact on it ('Stelazine By Starlight') recorded on a CD I made some years back, and it succeeded in freeing me from both the urge to ever make another CD and Stella's deadly grip on my psyche.
    Wow. I can imagine you standing up in a circle and saying, "Hi, I'm Mark. I'm a Song-A-Holic." "HI MARK!" "It all started when I was a child..."
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town