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  1. #1

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    I read some where about a famous "spy" chord... also refered to as the "James Bond chord".

    Do any of you guys know something about this? I recon it`s a E minor -something ? How to play it ?

    And as we are talking about James Bond - Anyone have tabs for the theme instrumental song - not like jazz, but like the original version?

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Coolaid
    I read some where about a famous "spy" chord... also refered to as the "James Bond" chord.

    Do any of you guys know something about this? I recon it`s a E minor -something ? How to play it ?

    And as we are talking about James Bond - Anyone have tabs for the theme instrumental song - not like jazz, but like the original version?
    The chord John Barry used extensively in the James Bond scores was the major/minor chord which is quite sinister.

  4. #3

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    try 0 10 9 8 7 x (you can also play the high E open, if you choose....)

    it's an Em/maj9

  5. #4

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    0 2 1 0 0 2

    which I analyse as Em(maj9) is often the last chord in the Pink Panther theme too.

  6. #5

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    I always thought it was a maj7#5.. actually, I guess it's the exact same thing though (as a min-maj9)

  7. #6

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    RThe james bond thing is more of a groove
    Play this Am Am#5 Am6 Am#5 Am

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by nomelite
    The chord John Barry used extensively in the James Bond scores was the major/minor chord which is quite sinister.
    I can play the intro for A view to a kill in my synthesizer and the chords are simply major and minor.
    Also you can play the sinister melody heard in every Bond movie with the notes B, C, C# and C...repeatedly. The thing is to play chromatically.

  9. #8
    Thanks a lot guys!

  10. #9
    Hi, new here to this forum, the guitarist for the bond films is a guy named Vic Flick, he came up with that chord. He also scored music for the pink Panther films and the Beatles. Check his website out Vic Flick Guitarman.

  11. #10

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    E min maj 9
    i.e. it has a min 3 & maj 7 & 9 - no?

  12. #11

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  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    try 0 10 9 8 7 x (you can also play the high E open, if you choose....)

    it's an Em/maj9
    I know we've been going on this for almost a year, but really, y'all, you can trust me...this time.

    you can also play it like this: 0 x 5 4 4 2

  14. #13

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    It's also the Dr evil chord...

  15. #14

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    Someone [edit: Joe - hi Joe] gave the correct counter for this theme, as:
    Am Am+5 Am6 Am+5 Am.

    The James Bond theme is of course not composed by John Barry, but by Monty (Norman, I think - getting far too old ).

    I used to work with an English Pianist/MD/composer/arranger who arr this music for the soundtrack. So the chord sequence you see above was his arrangement for the counter.
    Bert Rhodes is now playing piano with the angels, and he tells me that he wasn`t given any credit in any of the end titles for these movies.
    I did some cabaret scores when Bert was MD at the `Talk of the Town` restaurant and night spot in London`s West End. It closed down near the end of the `70s.

    The Em/maj79 is of course what JB used for all his original Bond music.
    I did a small bit of taking down AHA`s tracks for JB for The Living Daylight (Daylights?). JB was too lazy to do it himself.

    Best,
    A
    Last edited by Anthony Wakefield; 06-04-2010 at 07:16 AM. Reason: To enter Joe`s name.

  16. #15

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    nah, bill, sorry, i'm just being a sarcastic ass!

    This thread is old, and I always felt I answered the question in post #2! That's what I hear as the "spy chord," the ending of that james bond theme...but people went on to discuss afterwards...

    I don't hear a sixth, and definitely hear a m/maj7 sound there. I hear root, minor third, major seventh, and ninth...I just don't think the chord in the graphic is correct.

    on the guitar, it could be voiced 0 10 9 8 7 x or 0 x 5 4 4 2

    Being that it's a year later, I should probably grab a DVD and take a listen!
    Last edited by mr. beaumont; 06-04-2010 at 09:22 AM.

  17. #16

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    [CHORD]

    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|-7-|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|-8-|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|-9-|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|-10|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|H-7|---|---|---|---|

    [/CHORD]

    This is the chord I learned for the last chord in the bond theme in the key of E, I hit the 7th fret harmonic on the bottom E with my thumb, if I can I'll try for the harmonic on the top E with the side of my fretting index finger on the 7th. I don't know the name of this chord, B flat 6 somethng? I call it the 'Bond chord!'
    Ignoring the harmonics what is this chord shape called??

  18. #17

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    AARRRRRGGGGGGGHHHHHH!!!!!!!

    It's still an Em/maj9! I promise!

  19. #18

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    You seem a little tense...Thanks for the m/maj9 tho'

  20. #19

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    I'm better now, thank you...read the whole thread, my "tension" is a longstanding joke in this one...

  21. #20

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    So you're feeling somewhat 'flat' with this topic, due to it's 'diminished' returns
    I checked the thread at the very begining but gave up the will to live very quickly so I cut to the end and threw in my 'twa penny!
    Sorry if I antagonised, generally fret blind sometimes......

  22. #21

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    The chord mr. beaumont and jazzbow contributed sounds right to me.
    It's a G Major 7th Sharp Five (GM7#5) which is the flat-three chord of E Melodic Minor, the scale I'd play over it.
    chord = G B D# F#
    E Melodic Minor scale = E F# G A B C# D#

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by John Till
    The chord mr. beaumont and jazzbow contributed sounds right to me.
    It's a G Major 7th Sharp Five (GM7#5) which is the flat-three chord of E Melodic Minor, the scale I'd play over it.
    chord = G B D# F#
    E Melodic Minor scale = E F# G A B C# D#
    I use mr beumont's second inversion i.e. E,G,B,D#,F#. I've been using it for years and it's one of my favourite chords

    The E in the base means that it's probably more accurate to read it as e min / maj 9. Because of the way you have to ommit so many notes on the guitar I suspect it's kind of ambiguous anyway

    I often play this kind of chord progression using it

    EminMaj9 /// Em6add9 /// Em9 /// Em6add9 /// C# 7(#5,#9)// B# 7(#5,#9) /// EminMaj9 /// Em6add9 ///

    mmm melancholy

  24. #23

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    It's an Em/maj9, the song is very obviously in a minor key.

  25. #24

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    Yeah, sorry if it sounded like I wasn't agreeing with you--I was just trying to back you up--there's no reason to name that chord from the G...

  26. #25

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    As IAMMRBONGO and mr.beaumont point out, With an E on the bottom, it becomes a very rich sounding 5 note chord containing a 1, b3, 5, 7, 9
    After all, if the song is in E, why not put an E on the bottom of the final chord?

    But it's not actually there in the Youtube link posted by pingu, nor is it in the MGM Home Entertainment video "The Sound of James Bond", which ends with a close up of Vic Flick playing a solo guitar version of 5 verses, a chorus and the final chord.
    In both of those examples I hear a 4 note chord G MAJ 7#5 with a G on the bottom.

    Since the low E is available as an open string,
    and could have easily been played,
    I find it interesting that Mr. Flick chose not to.

    He did play much of the melody on the low E string,
    so perhaps he wanted to lighten the sound on the final chord.

    It's true that sometimes 'less is more"
    and what you leave out can be as
    important as what you play.

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