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  1. #1

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    I'm starting this thread to be a place for the discussion of the Modern Method for Guitar supplemental books and a place to post recordings from those books.

    In addition, other material that is at an appropriate level can be introduced and discussed ("other" meaning not the published Modern Method for Guitar material).

    And this can be a place to showcase anything you all want (like that ditty you just wrote last night) and also a place to just chat and socialize. Think of this as the local pub where we hang out.

    Hopefully the Modern Method folks will all join in.

    ___________________

    Here are the supplemental books that I know of:

    Reading Studies
    Melodic Rhythms for Guitar
    A Modern Method for Guitar - Jazz Songbook
    Classical Studies for Pick Style Guitar

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Good idea!

    About a month ago I hit a complete wall with Modern Method. I got to this point, there were so many things I just couldn't do, I couldn't make any progress counted in page numbers. I spent a good few weeks marking time with the book, and also playing from other books I found. Here's one:


  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Good idea!

    About a month ago I hit a complete wall with Modern Method. I got to this point, there were so many things I just couldn't do, I couldn't make any progress counted in page numbers. I spent a good few weeks marking time with the book, and also playing from other books I found. Here's one:
    That's nice TTL. I like practicing reading guitar from classical music. It's very satisfying as they are usually very complete and well thought out arrangements. And they sound good.

  5. #4

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    One of the forum members asked about the supplemental book 'A Modern Method For Guitar Jazz Songbook Vol 1. So I bought it and here's my review.

    The book has the music for 15 jazz standards and comes with a CD. Some of the songs have one guitar part and some have two parts notated (duets). Also, each song has chord diagrams between the title and the first stave.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Good idea!

    About a month ago I hit a complete wall with Modern Method. I got to this point, there were so many things I just couldn't do, I couldn't make any progress counted in page numbers. I spent a good few weeks marking time with the book, and also playing from other books I found. Here's one:

    Okay, so I'm sitting on the veranda eating a quiet meal, looking out over the water at dusk. Nice, TLT. Quite a switch from "Here We Go Again".

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    One of the forum members asked about the supplemental book 'A Modern Method For Guitar Jazz Songbook Vol 1. So I bought it and here's my review.

    The book has the music for 15 jazz standards and comes with a CD. Some of the songs have one guitar part and some have two parts notated (duets). Also, each song has chord diagrams between the title and the first stave.

    I recorded the 2nd song of the book on this video. The first half shows me playing the chord diagrams given for the piece and the 2nd half of the video shows me playing the notated part. I'm playing along with a backing track I made with Band-in-a-Box

    This tune could be attempted after you reach about 1/4 of the way through The Modern Method For Guitar Vol. 1

    Sounds good, FEP. I think I could get into this, but time might be a factor.
    We'll see. Hitting the 1/4 mark in MM1 was a feat unto itself. Can't believe we've come that far in such a short time. At the very least, this will be a good thread to drop in and just listen, if nothing else.

  8. #7

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    Here's a jam based around Picking Etude No. 2, P 33, MM1.
    Had no idea what I was doing, other than trying to make practice more interesting. I'm sure there's lots of technical problems with it due to lack of knowledge, but it was fun.

    This could be fun.
    http://www.box.com/s/947uo90vi68k46i4d8do
    Last edited by oldhead; 03-09-2012 at 06:37 PM. Reason: posted wrong file

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldhead View Post
    Here's a jam based around Picking Etude No. 2, P 33, MM1.
    Had no idea what I was doing, other than trying to make practice more interesting. I'm sure there's lots of technical problems with it due to lack of knowledge, but it was fun.

    This could be fun.
    Yes, fun indeed. Fun to listen to too. Way to get creative with the exercise.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Very enjoyable, Frank. I noticed you chose to play with your own backing (that's a cracking bass player you have there in your box). Do you prefer that to the CD that comes with the book?
    The CD with the book is recordings of someone playing the notated parts. There are no backing tracks with the book/cd. And, yes I do have a good bass player in that box.

    The piece didn't sound very interesting to me until I added a backing track.

  11. #10

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    Thanks for the encouragement, oldhead and fep.

    Oldhead, I thought your jam was quite musical and creative! How did you create the backing? This could be a new outlet for us - own jams and compositions based on those in the book.

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post

    The piece didn't sound very interesting to me until I added a backing track.
    I should try the same. I have BIAB and a realbook...

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Thanks for the encouragement, oldhead and fep.

    Oldhead, I thought your jam was quite musical and creative! How did you create the backing? This could be a new outlet for us - own jams and compositions based on those in the book.
    I listened to your guitar above a couple more times. That's really nice.

    Thanks, TLT. I play my guitar direct into a Digitech 155 effects pedal which has drum tracks, so I used that for drums. Also it has an effect for bass, playing your guitar, but it's not a very good bass sound, so I used that for the bass and just played the single notes in the exercise for the bass. Then made the rhythm track (I had two, one with a C9 and one with Cmaj7, but accidentally deleted the better of the two); then a separate track for the exercise part and then made a track for what I loosely call the lead guitar (just noodling by ear - that took a while) Recorded into Audacity. Sounds like BIAB would be a lot simpler, but I had a great time making it and it gives you practice working on your timing by playing all the different tracks.

    Now a question for anybody: I'm working on Autumn Leaves (PDF and backing track from FEP), but having trouble soloing outside the melody. How do you know what notes will fit? I know all the chord notes work, but do you use the notes in the key sig scale or some other scale? I thought it interesting that it has one #, which is what we just finished in MM1. Any BASIC help would be appreciated. Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by oldhead; 03-11-2012 at 11:29 AM. Reason: add

  14. #13

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    Thanks again, oldhead, I have a few more like that. Must get happy with BIAB, it has it's own learning curve.

    As for Autumn Leaves, sounds like you are playing it in E minor so you could do worse than to solo a G major scale up and down, or look ahead to p.43 and do an E harmonic minor scale. If you can switch between scales and arps it will sound really cool.

  15. #14

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    I recorded the rhythm and melody for Study I today and thought I would share it with the group as part of our supplemental thread. I am practicing from Melodic Rhythms. Hopefully I can put something up once a week maybe.

    I've also been studying from Al Di Meola's Chords, Scales & Arpeggios book. I'm about a month into that book almost finished with Lesson 1. I enjoy both supplemental books.

    There are some rough spots in here for sure. When I added the chords it sure beat playing the melody alone and made it funner. One thing I'm starting to gradually understand is how the space of the measure can be filled so speak with a run off lead part. I've been working on this but my memorization of scales is weak at this point

    Melodic Rhythms Study 1.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    Here is Study 1:

    http://www.box.com/s/5uiou484cfjavg6h75lv
    Last edited by Will Glen; 03-11-2012 at 07:30 PM.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Thanks again, oldhead, I have a few more like that. Must get happy with BIAB, it has it's own learning curve.

    As for Autumn Leaves, sounds like you are playing it in E minor so you could do worse than to solo a G major scale up and down, or look ahead to p.43 and do an E harmonic minor scale. If you can switch between scales and arps it will sound really cool.
    If you have one #, how do you know if it's Key of G or E-? Sorry if that sounds like a dumb question. I know E- is relative minor of G, but how do you know you're playing in E- as opposed to G?

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldhead View Post
    If you have one #, how do you know if it's Key of G or E-? Sorry if that sounds like a dumb question. I know E- is relative minor of G, but how do you know you're playing in E- as opposed to G?
    You have to memorize a rule: "one note above the last sharp in the key signature is the key will give you the major key, the minor key will be the 6th note of the major keys scale"

    For flats, the major key is the 2nd to last flat except in the key of F which has one flat. And again the relative minor is the 6th note of the major scale.

    For soloing use the E natural minor except for the B7 (or B7b9) chord, on that chord use E harmonic minor. That is only one of the choices but is a good one to start with.

    E natural minor: E F# G A B C D E
    E Harmonic minor: E F# G A B C D# E

  18. #17

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    Since oldhead is working on Autumn Leaves, I just worked up an Autumn Leaves Solo in 1st Position. Here is my notation:

    Autumn Leaves 1st Position.pdf - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    And a video (with a couple of hiccups)


  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldhead View Post
    If you have one #, how do you know if it's Key of G or E-? Sorry if that sounds like a dumb question. I know E- is relative minor of G, but how do you know you're playing in E- as opposed to G?
    Not a dumb question. If you are soloing (as opposed to playing a scale) it doesn't matter what note you start on. Try to see E minor as the same as G, it just starts in a different place, but this is irrelevant for soloing. The only slight wrinkle is that sometimes you may want the D# of the harmonic minor.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Glen View Post
    I recorded the rhythm and melody for Study I today and thought I would share it with the group as part of our supplemental thread. I am practicing from Melodic Rhythms. Hopefully I can put something up once a week maybe.

    I've also been studying from Al Di Meola's Chords, Scales & Arpeggios book. I'm about a month into that book almost finished with Lesson 1. I enjoy both supplemental books.

    There are some rough spots in here for sure. When I added the chords it sure beat playing the melody alone and made it funner. One thing I'm starting to gradually understand is how the space of the measure can be filled so speak with a run off lead part. I've been working on this but my memorization of scales is weak at this point

    Melodic Rhythms Study 1.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    Here is Study 1:

    leavitt sample.JPG - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage
    Ok, Will, you've inspired me. Will go back and try this. Sounds good, together with the chords. I like your occasional hammer-ons.
    Last edited by ten left thumbs; 03-12-2012 at 04:14 AM. Reason: grammar

  21. #20

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    I just got the book 'Classical Studies For Pick-Style Guitar by William Leavitt' today as a goal to use it for sight-reading practice. The Allegro by M. Carcassi is the 2nd tune in the book and is the tune played on this video.

    These tunes are to be played with a pick, and it is quite difficult for me to play them that way with all the string skipping you have to do. Playing them Classical Style with my fingers is much easier. But, since this book is about developing ones picking technique, I'll play them with a pick.

    These tunes sound real good. They are a little to advanced for me for sight-reading which is a good thing, I'll have to push myself. They will really develop ones picking technique.

    I'm giving the book 5 stars.

    My performance... there's some mistakes, 2 stars.


  22. #21

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    Wow, fep, very classical. You got me digging around. I have, just gathering dust on the shelf, a 25 estudios by Carcassi. Turns out allegro is #7. I think this was donated by some kind soul who heard I was learning guitar. This particular etude has a red pen mark around the #7 and is covered in pencil markings iama as well as a few ups and downs. So, it looks like it's mostly in open position? There are no markings to help me there.

    If this goes well I could look at some of the others. I'll just follow the pencil markings, on the grounds that somebody somewhere played it.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Glen View Post
    I recorded the rhythm and melody for Study I today and thought I would share it with the group as part of our supplemental thread. I am practicing from Melodic Rhythms. Hopefully I can put something up once a week maybe.

    I've also been studying from Al Di Meola's Chords, Scales & Arpeggios book. I'm about a month into that book almost finished with Lesson 1. I enjoy both supplemental books.

    There are some rough spots in here for sure. When I added the chords it sure beat playing the melody alone and made it funner. One thing I'm starting to gradually understand is how the space of the measure can be filled so speak with a run off lead part. I've been working on this but my memorization of scales is weak at this point

    Melodic Rhythms Study 1.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    Here is Study 1:

    leavitt sample.JPG - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage
    Will, can you point me in the right direction for the chords in the B section? Did you take the B7 as open or 7th fret? I can simplify, but if you can give any help for those sus chords, and the 7b9 I'd be grateful. I think I'm OK for the A section.

  24. #23

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    Oldhead, how goes the soloing?

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Oldhead, how goes the soloing?
    NOT WELL, but because you asked and because of everyone's support and help, I feel somewhat obligated to let you know where I'm at. I'm almost embarrassed to post this, as it progressively falls apart; however this will be a good benchmark to see how it progresses, and I know I'm among friends. Plus, we have to be able to laugh at ourselves. Life is short. There is one lick I like starting at about 4:16, but I probably won't be able to duplicate it. I must have had an accident at that spot. Bear in mind, this was the first time at trying to play all the way through and record the parts, with no re-takes, as you'll hear. I think learning to solo is going to be fun but not easy. It will also give you an idea of what's rattling around in my mind for this piece. Because business has gone bonkers and I have to go to Johns Hopkins next week, I probably won't be playing, even the lessons, until about a week or so from now. I'll check in from time to time, though. I do appreciate your interest.

    And thanks, FEP, for the downloads and info.
    Autumn First Pass.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    I just got the book 'Classical Studies For Pick-Style Guitar by William Leavitt' today as a goal to use it for sight-reading practice. The Allegro by M. Carcassi is the 2nd tune in the book and is the tune played on this video.

    These tunes are to be played with a pick, and it is quite difficult for me to play them that way with all the string skipping you have to do. Playing them Classical Style with my fingers is much easier. But, since this book is about developing ones picking technique, I'll play them with a pick.

    These tunes sound real good. They are a little to advanced for me for sight-reading which is a good thing, I'll have to push myself. They will really develop ones picking technique.

    I'm giving the book 5 stars.

    My performance... there's some mistakes, 2 stars.

    Really nice, FEP. I could listen to that for hours. What make and gauge strings do you use on your Eastman? You get a beautiful sound out of that guitar. thanks for sharing that one.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Glen View Post
    I recorded the rhythm and melody for Study I today and thought I would share it with the group as part of our supplemental thread. I am practicing from Melodic Rhythms. Hopefully I can put something up once a week maybe.

    I've also been studying from Al Di Meola's Chords, Scales & Arpeggios book. I'm about a month into that book almost finished with Lesson 1. I enjoy both supplemental books.

    There are some rough spots in here for sure. When I added the chords it sure beat playing the melody alone and made it funner. One thing I'm starting to gradually understand is how the space of the measure can be filled so speak with a run off lead part. I've been working on this but my memorization of scales is weak at this point

    Melodic Rhythms Study 1.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    Here is Study 1:

    leavitt sample.JPG - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage
    Hey Will, That Melodic Rhythm study 1 sounded really cool. Well played and thanks for posting. I like it, I'm going to start playing from that book.

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldhead View Post
    NOT WELL, but because you asked and because of everyone's support and help, I feel somewhat obligated to let you know where I'm at. I'm almost embarrassed to post this, as it progressively falls apart; however this will be a good benchmark to see how it progresses, and I know I'm among friends. Plus, we have to be able to laugh at ourselves. Life is short. There is one lick I like starting at about 4:16, but I probably won't be able to duplicate it. I must have had an accident at that spot. Bear in mind, this was the first time at trying to play all the way through and record the parts, with no re-takes, as you'll hear. I think learning to solo is going to be fun but not easy. It will also give you an idea of what's rattling around in my mind for this piece. Because business has gone bonkers and I have to go to Johns Hopkins next week, I probably won't be playing, even the lessons, until about a week or so from now. I'll check in from time to time, though. I do appreciate your interest.

    And thanks, FEP, for the downloads and info.
    Autumn First Pass.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage
    Hey Dave, that sounds real nice. You played the melody really well, and I'm enjoying the comping. Very musical. That's a good approach.

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by oldhead View Post
    Thought that was quite good actually, that swings.

    Improvisation is it's own discipline. I don't think there's a book that can teach you. From my own attempts over the last few years, I wouldn't especially expect anything more than that from yourself - not for a long time and not unless you get a teacher.

    Keep swingin' man!

    Frank, you're a lot handsomer now. That goonie's just not your colour.

  30. #29

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    TLT, Here is a response to your question about chords. When I tried to reply quoting you it would not allow me to use the chord diagrams.

    I played the B7 using the fifth string root. Here are the 7sus4, 9sus4 and 7b9 chords with sixth string roots. In Study 1 I just played a dominant 7 because of the large movement up to the tenth fret to play the 9sus4. I'm learning the fifth string root chords now which is making things alot smooth as far as having to jump up and down the neck.

    7
    [CHORD]

    ||---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-X-|---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-X-|---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-R-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|

    [/CHORD]

    7sus4
    [CHORD]

    ||---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-X-|---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-X-|---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|

    [/CHORD]
    9sus4

    [CHORD]

    ||---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|---|-X--|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-R-|---|-X--|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|

    [/CHORD]
    7(b9)

    [CHORD]

    ||---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|-X-|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|
    ||---|---|-R--|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|---|

    [/CHORD]

    in the 7(b9) chord the R is an invisible root used for reference, not for playing.

    Check out Al's book entitled "Chords, Scales and Arpeggios". He teaches 27 different chords. Each chord is taught in 10 different positions on the neck.
    Last edited by Will Glen; 03-13-2012 at 02:24 PM.

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Glen View Post
    TLT, Here is a response to your question about chords. When I tried to reply quoting you it would not allow me to use the chord diagrams.

    ...
    Check out Al's book entitled "Chords, Scales and Arpeggios". He teaches 27 different chords. Each chord is taught in 10 different positions on the neck.
    Thanks Will I just ordered the book. Like I don't have enough books! This one looks good though, I could see from the amazon look inside thing.

    I worked on the etude a little more, and realised if I play the B7 at the 7th fret, the E min is right there.

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Thanks Will I just ordered the book. Like I don't have enough books! This one looks good though, I could see from the amazon look inside thing.

    I worked on the etude a little more, and realised if I play the B7 at the 7th fret, the E min is right there.
    Let me know how you like the book. I'm interested to hear your take on it. I am having some difficulty with his fingerings (D) and (E) for the major scale and have not clearly understood his position shifts. I'm trying to figure this out but have not gotten it yet.

    I have a book called Rhythms Complete by Bugs Bower and it is alot like Leavitt's Melodic Rhythms. Here is the 1st study from it. I recorded the chords and then tried to take the melody and mess around with it mostly just targeting the first note of the measure and the last note of the measure.

    Like Leavitt's Melodic Rhythms it presents alot of syncopated rhythms that I would like to learn eventually and incorporate to some extent when I learn how to improvise.

    If anyone wants any of these exercises posted let me know and I will scan and post some. I think they tie in well with what we are learning in MMI and are good chord exercises also.

    Bugs Bower Rhythm No 1.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage
    Last edited by Will Glen; 03-18-2012 at 04:28 PM.

  33. #32

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    Pass the coconuts will! Very calypso.

    I recorded a few more last week. Will try embedding again. The rhythm doesn't come across well in this one - I was counting in my head, but the listener needs a click to get the beat.

    Last edited by ten left thumbs; 03-18-2012 at 04:57 PM.

  34. #33

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    Hi folks, everyone busy?

    Will, the Di Meola book arrived some time ago and I've made a start on the first lesson. I'm not sure I'm cut out for this chord-drilling lark ('learn the chords on page such-and-such'). I don't suppose it would do to complain that a book entitled 'A guide to chords, scales and arpeggios' has too many chords in it? I mean, it does what it says on the tin.

    It's just that I have a brain like a sieve. Are you doing the lessons as instructed?

    On the upside I've been playing from melodic rhythms, trying to swap through the positions I know. Also playing Gymnopodie #1 (Satie) as a duet with my son. This week's lesson is Eine Kleine Nachmusik.

    What's everyone been up to?

  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Hi folks, everyone busy?

    Will, the Di Meola book arrived some time ago and I've made a start on the first lesson. I'm not sure I'm cut out for this chord-drilling lark ('learn the chords on page such-and-such'). I don't suppose it would do to complain that a book entitled 'A guide to chords, scales and arpeggios' has too many chords in it? I mean, it does what it says on the tin.

    It's just that I have a brain like a sieve. Are you doing the lessons as instructed?

    On the upside I've been playing from melodic rhythms, trying to swap through the positions I know. Also playing Gymnopodie #1 (Satie) as a duet with my son. This week's lesson is Eine Kleine Nachmusik.

    What's everyone been up to?
    Too many chords!!! The more the better!

    Yes, I'm following the book closely and study from it daily. I hate it sometimes but this is because I can be lazy and it is demanding but at the same time I love it because its straightforward in teaching fundamental tools to hopefully enable me to develop a stronger foundation. At least this is what I have convinced myself of as I plow through the material!

    I have completed Lesson 1 in its entirety and it took me over a month to get it done. I'm in Lesson II now while reviewing Lesson I like how we do MMI.

    A big challenge for me has been trying to be able to transpose the third pattern of the 12 bar blues of lesson 1 in all the keys. In lesson II this gets even harder during the Jazz Chord Exercise Studies. I have decided to write them out in each key because doing it on the fly is not working for me.

    I am still not smooth on FORM I chords like the Maj9 and 13(#9) chords. Being able to combine the FORM I (root 6th string) chords and FORM II (root 5th string) chords is making playing much smoother because I don't have to jump up and down the fretboard chasing the sixth string root chords. As I learn the other chord FORMS I am beginning to see how it enables me to play faster and smoother within a smaller area of the fretboard.

    I'm not up to snuff on my theory but I'm pretty sure that all the different chord forms are for is so that we can play more melodically with our chords using what is called "inversions", putting the melody note on top of the given chord form. I take the chords I'm learning and then play from the Real Book tunes that I'm able to and things are coming along.

    I memorized the 12 bar blues patterns and the Jazz Chord Exercise studies and have just begun to start recording some progressions with Maj and min chords so I can practice the arpeggios over them. Memorizing the different 12 Bar Blues patterns gives a structure to then start to play the scales and arpeggios over them. I think this might be the application of Chord/Scale Theory but I'm not sure.

    I chose the book because I want to become much more proficient with knowing and playing chords, scales and arpeggios. The book is doing that for me in a very systematic manner.

    Enough rambling from me. I look forward to hearing Gymnopodie #1 that you all are working on if you post it up. Sounds like an interesting piece. Take care and have a good one.

    Will

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Hi folks, everyone busy?

    Will, the Di Meola book arrived some time ago and I've made a start on the first lesson. I'm not sure I'm cut out for this chord-drilling lark ('learn the chords on page such-and-such'). I don't suppose it would do to complain that a book entitled 'A guide to chords, scales and arpeggios' has too many chords in it? I mean, it does what it says on the tin.

    It's just that I have a brain like a sieve. Are you doing the lessons as instructed?

    On the upside I've been playing from melodic rhythms, trying to swap through the positions I know. Also playing Gymnopodie #1 (Satie) as a duet with my son. This week's lesson is Eine Kleine Nachmusik.

    What's everyone been up to?
    Cool that sounds like great material you are working on with your son.

    Yeah, the DiMeola sounds tough. You've got plenty of time though.

    Me, I recorded a version of Misty over at the other study group, post # 18 here:

    March 2012 - Misty



    (From a recent thread that asked the same question)
    And, I'm practicing four songs for a workshop this evening that I'm attending. My guitar teacher invited me to the workshop. (Actually my last lesson was Dec. 2010. It's nice that he still keeps in touch).

    The workshop works this way: Three of the 1st call pros in town have each invited three of their students to the workshop. The three pros are my guitar teacher, a stand up bass player and a drummer. Each of the students will play with the trio substituting for their instructor and then there will be critiques.

    So, I'll be playing with the drummer and the bass player, both top pros in San Diego. I've seen all these pros play many times over the years. I'm excited, it's seems like a really good format. Same price as a lesson, $50.

    (And a pretty smart way for the instructors to generate some additional revenue).
    Last edited by fep; 03-29-2012 at 05:02 PM.

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Glen View Post
    Too many chords!!! The more the better!

    Yes, I'm following the book closely and study from it daily. I hate it sometimes but this is because I can be lazy and it is demanding but at the same time I love it because its straightforward in teaching fundamental tools to hopefully enable me to develop a stronger foundation. At least this is what I have convinced myself of as I plow through the material! ...


    Will
    All good perspectives Will. I think the first lesson could take me a year! I think I will focus on getting through the chords, rather than memorizing them, get on to the exercises, or applying the chords elsewhere, and refer back when I need them. So the first jazz chord exercise looks fairly familiar, I already do something similar. I can't say I understand the blues exercises. Blues is fine, but what are all the roman numerals doing? I, II- B and the like. They look neither like position marks, nor like numbers of chords in a scale (IV-V-I). perhaps it will make more sense if I go through in order.

    Anyway, the book will have done its job if it distracts me from Modern Method, and also makes me realise how much I love MM after all!

    Frank, your Misty is truly awesome! You become a different person when you play for real. Do you play in a band at all? Your workshop sounds great, it is good to touch base with teachers who have helped in the past.

    I haven't managed to record gymnopodie, but along similar lines, I am experimenting with playing piano music. This is from an easy book, and i recorded the 'hands' one at a time. Menuet by Krieger.

    menuet hands together.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    All good perspectives Will. I think the first lesson could take me a year! I think I will focus on getting through the chords, rather than memorizing them, get on to the exercises, or applying the chords elsewhere, and refer back when I need them. So the first jazz chord exercise looks fairly familiar, I already do something similar. I can't say I understand the blues exercises. Blues is fine, but what are all the roman numerals doing? I, II- B and the like. They look neither like position marks, nor like numbers of chords in a scale (IV-V-I). perhaps it will make more sense if I go through in order.

    Anyway, the book will have done its job if it distracts me from Modern Method, and also makes me realise how much I love MM after all!

    Frank, your Misty is truly awesome! You become a different person when you play for real. Do you play in a band at all? Your workshop sounds great, it is good to touch base with teachers who have helped in the past.

    I haven't managed to record gymnopodie, but along similar lines, I am experimenting with playing piano music. This is from an easy book, and i recorded the 'hands' one at a time. Menuet by Krieger.

    menuet hands together.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    You are correct, they are neither. They tell what FORM of chord to play from the 10 different FORMS he teaches for each chord.

    Taking page 86 as an example.

    Ex. IV at the beginning signifies Exercise 4

    The roman numeral I above the Gm (measure 1) means to play FORM I Gm chord (root on the 6th string). There are ten different FORMS per chord and this tells us to play the FORM I chord.

    The roman numeral II above the Cm (measure 2) means to play FORM II of the Cm chord (root on the 5th string).

    The roman numeral II-B above the D7 (measure 9) means to play FORM II, shape B chord. In the FORM II chords there are two different ways to play a dominant 7th chord and rather than play the A shape, he wants us to play the B shape.

    In Exercise III you will notice an A with the circle around it and also a B with the circle around it. This introduces us to substitutions. So rather than play a G7 we can play a G9 instead. It builds from here and he has a substitution chart at the back of the book. I'm just starting to realize on a basic level about substitutions and how some chords are identical to other chords. Different names but same notes.
    Last edited by Will Glen; 03-31-2012 at 07:39 PM.

  39. #38

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Glen View Post
    You are correct, they are neither. They tell what FORM of chord to play from the 10 different FORMS he teaches for each chord.

    Taking page 86 as an example.

    Ex. IV at the beginning signifies Exercise 4

    The roman numeral I above the Gm (measure 1) means to play FORM I Gm chord (root on the 6th string). There are ten different FORMS per chord and this tells us to play the FORM I chord.

    The roman numeral II above the Cm (measure 2) means to play FORM II of the Cm chord (root on the 5th string).

    The roman numeral II-B above the D7 (measure 9) means to play FORM II, shape B chord. In the FORM II chords there are two different ways to play a dominant 7th chord and rather than play the A shape, he wants us to play the B shape.
    Oh, I see, thanks!

    In Exercise III you will notice an A with the circle around it and also a B with the circle around it. This introduces us to substitutions. So rather than play a G7 we can play a G9 instead. It builds from here and he has a substitution chart at the back of the book. I'm just starting to realize on a basic level about substitutions and how some chords are identical to other chords. Different names but same notes.
    Yes, I'd got that. As for substitutions - tbh, I find the layout of the chords quite confusing in that he doesn't respect (much) the function of the chord while teaching it - so examples from the different chord types are scattered all over. Learning them in the order that he gives them will not teach you a broad overview of how they work. The master guide is perhaps helpful, but even then, why separate out the dom7 and dom9 just to say that they can be substituted for each other?

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Glen View Post
    In Exercise III you will notice an A with the circle around it and also a B with the circle around it. This introduces us to substitutions. So rather than play a G7 we can play a G9 instead. It builds from here and he has a substitution chart at the back of the book. I'm just starting to realize on a basic level about substitutions and how some chords are identical to other chords. Different names but same notes.
    Hi Will,

    Just a small terminology point. At least, this is how I was taught the terminology. It's logical and makes sense to me. I wish I could find it in a book to refer you too.

    Three terms I'll mention, extension, alteration, and substitution.

    An extension is adding another tone in the "stack of thirds". For example if you play a G9 instead of a G7, that is an extension.

    Alterations are changing the chord tones (or the normal extended chord tones). If you play a G7b9 instead of a G7, that's an alteration.

    Substitutions are choosing a chord with another root to replace the original chord. If you replace G7 with Db9, that's a substitution (a tritone substitution in this case).
    Last edited by fep; 04-01-2012 at 11:29 AM.

  41. #40

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  42. #41

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    Hi Will, As we discussed.

    This is for all the MM1 folks, you probably want to go to full screen to see the notation clearly.

    Self critique, I got a little behind the metronome on the last exercise. Sorry, but it's not too bad and you certainly get the idea of how to go about these exercises.


  43. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Thanks. Now, how? It's got to be easier than learning 3000 different chords.
    TLT,

    I'm pretty sure that you were inserting the homepage link to your YouTube vid rather than the specific link to the You Tube video. Make sure you pull the page up that is the specific link for the video, rather than the You Tube home page. Hope this makes sense.


    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    Hi Will, As we discussed.

    This is for all the MM1 folks, you probably want to go to full screen to see the notation clearly.

    Self critique, I got a little behind the metronome on the last exercise. Sorry, but it's not too bad and you certainly get the idea of how to go about these exercises.

    Thanks alot Fep. I really appreciate this and will be working on what you have laid out here. You made some very helpful points in this vid. I was taught by my instructor several years ago to count 1-trip-let, 2-trip-let etc and think it's a good starting point (at that time I was only at just learning to count slow triplets) but as you mention that ta,ta,ta is going to be much more practical at faster tempos. Thanks again.
    Last edited by Will Glen; 04-04-2012 at 02:34 PM.

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Glen View Post

    I'm pretty sure that you were inserting the homepage link to your YouTube vid rather than the specific link to the You Tube video. Make sure you pull the page up that is the specific link for the video, rather than the You Tube home page. Hope this makes sense.
    I'm sure you're right, Will. I'm just not sure how to find it without it being on my channel. Then there are all sorts of embed codes, but nothing seems to work. Thanks for doing it anyway.

  45. #44

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    I've been working on Autumn Leaves and finally after about a month or so got it where I can play it all the way through and hopefully learn about how to make it more interesting and sound more jazzy eventually and improvise in the future but this will be a ways off for me. I've read to follow the melody and at times I am picking notes around the melody in attempts to harmonize it. I'm hoping I'm on the right track and moving in the right direction.

    My goal will be to learn the melody in some other positions and include more voicings eventually and other chords. I would really like to learn how to do some bass runs eventually.

    Autumn Leaves take 4 10 2012.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    I'm on the hunt for another tune to begin working on if anyone wants to make a suggestion??? Perhaps another ballad like Autumn Leaves??
    Last edited by Will Glen; 04-10-2012 at 05:25 PM.

  46. #45

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    That's beautiful Will. I never tire of that one.

    Was that you doing chord melody, or was that two recordings?

    You could join in the standards thread in the other forum, i think they do a standard a month. Great thing about autumn leaves is the melody is slow and predictable enough, it gives you time to think. Will try to think of another steady one.

    I've still been working on the first Melodic Rhythms tune, finding the chord changes painfully slow. Will try to record soon, no matter how slow it is.

  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    That's beautiful Will. I never tire of that one.

    Was that you doing chord melody, or was that two recordings?

    You could join in the standards thread in the other forum, i think they do a standard a month. Great thing about autumn leaves is the melody is slow and predictable enough, it gives you time to think. Will try to think of another steady one.

    I've still been working on the first Melodic Rhythms tune, finding the chord changes painfully slow. Will try to record soon, no matter how slow it is.
    Thanks TLT and I love the melody and I'm with you on not tiring of this tune. I think more than anything it is the melodies that drew me to trying to learn how to play jazz. I was doing a chord melody with one guitar in this recording.

    The chord changes are the hardest part for me also. Here are a few videos I found helpful and only just found out about Fishers's and Les Wise's. I've stopped practicing chords like Pebber Brown shows and have replaced it with how Fisher shows to compare and see what produces the best results for me personally. I think there is value in each one. Likewise, I now am beginning to approach learning new tunes by following Les Wise's great instruction:

    Have a good one,

    Will








  48. #47

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    Hi Will, I think there is value in each idea to learning chords - probably I need to do a bit of all, but we do need to accept it takes time. I admit I get frustrated with Pebber's approach - I'm sure well-meant - but if I could just form the shape in the air and stick it straight on the fretboard, then I would, and if I could do it without looking. "How to be an expert - just be an expert" - it's an approach that doesn't work for me.

    Interesting when I last had a lesson, and I mentioned a chord was troubling me, the teacher took me through placing my fingers on the strings in correct position, but not to fret, just to mute the strings. Strum. Try it, it's hard for a difficult chord. Then press just a shade harder. Strum, still muting. Each time press just a shade harder. Once you're sounding all notes, immediately go back to muting pressure and repeat.

    I thought it was interesting because it's the exact opposite of Jody's extra pressure idea. But the rationale is you also discover how little pressure is actually needed, and it's good for relaxed technique.

    How you getting on with Al Di M? Have to admit I get frustrated with him too. Dear oh dear I'm a difficult customer to please. But really, when he writes '1st fret' or '3rd fret' under a chord, he could make it clear which fret he is referring to, otherwise, why bother writing?

  49. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Glen View Post
    I've been working on Autumn Leaves and finally after about a month or so got it where I can play it all the way through and hopefully learn about how to make it more interesting and sound more jazzy eventually and improvise in the future but this will be a ways off for me. I've read to follow the melody and at times I am picking notes around the melody in attempts to harmonize it. I'm hoping I'm on the right track and moving in the right direction.

    My goal will be to learn the melody in some other positions and include more voicings eventually and other chords. I would really like to learn how to do some bass runs eventually.

    Autumn Leaves take 4 10 2012.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online
    File Storage


    I'm on the hunt for another tune to begin working on if anyone wants to make a suggestion??? Perhaps another ballad like Autumn Leaves??
    Hey, Will, just ran across this one. Very nicely done and pleasant to listen to. Thanks for posting it.

  50. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Glen View Post
    ...
    Autumn Leaves take 4 10 2012.mp3 - File Shared from Box - Free Online File Storage

    I'm on the hunt for another tune to begin working on if anyone wants to make a suggestion??? Perhaps another ballad like Autumn Leaves??
    Hi Will, You're going great on the chord melody - I have no idea how and am probably best not to ask.

    If you're looking for suggestions, how about:

    It's a wonderful world
    Misty
    Somewhere over the rainbow
    Don't get around much anymore

    You're probably best going with something you really like. I'm just trying to think of really lyrical songs that aren't too fussy and don't have too many key changes.

  51. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Will Glen View Post
    That's awesome.