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  1. #151

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    Thanks, I'll have to think about it now. I don't mind the time investment, just need to be able to see the exercises or approach for what they are.

    I might have to put my own lessons together from a variety of sources, that combines technical/theory/tunes. I don't think I've come across one book that encompasses all of these things, but the Van Eps one LOOKS like it comes close. It may be another one to add to the arsenal as I don't have anything so specifically guitar. I've heard Ted Greene's books being recommended, but at first glance it looks overly complicated, or maybe it's just not written in the most logical, progressive way?

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #152

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    Quote Originally Posted by p1p
    Thanks, I'll have to think about it now. I don't mind the time investment, just need to be able to see the exercises or approach for what they are.

    I might have to put my own lessons together from a variety of sources, that combines technical/theory/tunes. I don't think I've come across one book that encompasses all of these things, but the Van Eps one LOOKS like it comes close. It may be another one to add to the arsenal as I don't have anything so specifically guitar. I've heard Ted Greene's books being recommended, but at first glance it looks overly complicated, or maybe it's just not written in the most logical, progressive way?
    I've mainly looked at Modern Chord Progressions. This particular book isn't big on theory but it does give you a ton of different ideas for various common progressions: I-iii-IV-V, I-vi-ii-V, iii-vi-ii-V, III7-VI7-II7-V7, etc. Again, you might need some other sources if you want to work on your music theory (remember music theory is the same across the board, it doesn't necessarily have to be a guitar book). Try keeping some sort of a notebook that you can use to refer back to the different ideas you come across. Keep it as simple as possible. A lot of the jargon sometimes makes things sound more complicated than they actually are.

    Actually, what I would recommend is the Ted Greene website. A lot of the lesson sheets he gave to his students have been posted on there. Well worth checking out. TedGreene.com - Teachings - Single Note Soloing

  4. #153

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    Quote Originally Posted by monk
    I'm giving this thread a bump to share a "new" Van Eps track that I discovered a few weeks ago. I heard this Jo Stafford take on Walkin' My Baby Back Home and recognized George Van Eps when he took a solo at 1:30. George,plectrum, acoustic archtop. To me, it doesn't get any better.
    I've just transcribed that whole solo here: George Van Eps "Walkin' My Baby Back Home" transcription. Really tasteful stuff from Mr. Van Eps, and it fits under the fingers nicely.

    Adrian

  5. #154

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    A few days ago the Solid Guitar Channel started with this series.
    There are 3 videos up until now.

  6. #155

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    Still, this video presents the same 1st inversion C major triad scale one octave in 4 or 5 fingering variations.
    If not through tab in this video format, how then best to convey this variance. In standard notation,
    each variation would appear as the same event. Tab conveys location, George was even more specific,
    indicating exact fingering, his concerns included mechanics presented by making the same musical event
    changes with alternative fingerings.