Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    __________________________________________________ ___________________________________________
    God put me on this earth to accomplish a certain number of things -- right now I am so far behind I will never die!

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    I've been listening to Adrian Belew a lot these days. His works with Fripp during the King Crimson group really defy genre labels in the ways that some of the most adventurous players in "jazz" also do. As rock music has gone beyond its R&B roots, created something not limited by genre and audience expectation, jazz has been redefining boundries in the same way.
    Robert Fripp's music may not have the same genre specific swing sense that jazz has, but his roles as composer and brilliant band leader is very much in the spirit of where a lot of improvisational music is going.
    I like seeing discussions of musicians in non-jazz traditions like Bowie, Zappa, late era Miles... who are using the talents of great jazz and exploratory musicians to make music that redefines what can be done. It was great to see Bowie work with Ben Monder, Zappa working with Archie Shepp, Fripp working with Adrian Belew. I've long wondered what a collaboration with Bill Frisell would wind up being.

    David

  4. #3

    User Info Menu



    Fripp is my hero. His playing is knotty and inspired. He has always been his own person. He made Bowie even better. (No disrespect to Ronson or Gabrels.)

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Robert Fripp is a musician/composer who happens to play guitar, so I hope we can talk about him here!

    Early Crimson (especially their live work!) was 1970's heavy-metal jazz, with some nice "songs" thrown in for good measure!
    I saw the 80's lineup a few times, and they blew us away!
    Never explored Fripp's alternate tunings or anything, but I dig him as a player and composer.

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    fripp @ 21 years old



    cheers

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by marcwhy View Post
    Robert Fripp is a musician/composer who happens to play guitar, so I hope we can talk about him here!

    Early Crimson (especially their live work!) was 1970's heavy-metal jazz, with some nice "songs" thrown in for good measure!
    I saw the 80's lineup a few times, and they blew us away!
    Never explored Fripp's alternate tunings or anything, but I dig him as a player and composer.
    I remember seeing them (80's era KC) in college and people were trying to dance to non-4/4 songs. They would hop at the extra beats. It was awesome.

  8. #7

    User Info Menu





    I always liked the Andy Summers album "I Advance Masked."



    I enjoy "The League" as well. Kinda scary and cult like, but I don't know of anything remotely similar. That many guitars playing together would be mush under any other concept. I like the comment of giving them a sitting Ovation. Also, for the entire last segment the guy front left doesn't play or move at all. There has to be some tongue and cheek in that.

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    The League of Gentlemen, Fripp's new wave band:


  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    saw fripp perform his solo soundscapes in the shadows of the world trade center a few times shortly before 9/11...he played the world financial centre! (on a few occasions)...strange yet ethereal...his mother had recently passed before one performance..and it had great moving impact...

    only intensified in retrospect



    cheers

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    ES-175VOSsp..SadowskySemi..Ibanez S6521Q w/GK3..DV Mark LJ..Dispatch Master V2..Atomic CLR..BossGP10..Line6.G10
    https://soundcloud.com/user852059642/tracks

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Fripp makes Johnny Mac sound like the guy next door!

    Fripp's early stuff (Giles, Giles and Fripp) showed he had a strong jazz background. On "Digging My Lawn", he had some Wes-type stuff going on, and that "Suite in D" neatomic posted showed he had phenomenal technique.
    On the first KC LP he played the schist out of the ensemble passages on 21st CSM, and rolled off the tone control on his LP or Tele on a lot of the other tunes to get an almost flute-like sound on his lines.
    The first KC band were heavily into free jazz on "Moonchild" and he and McDonald used to go nuts on the few live things I've heard of the band.

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    Rodney was a sad young man because he was fat and ugly......

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    ^


    cheers

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by TruthHertz View Post
    I've been listening to Adrian Belew a lot these days. His works with Fripp during the King Crimson group really defy genre labels in the ways that some of the most adventurous players in "jazz" also do. As rock music has gone beyond its R&B roots, created something not limited by genre and audience expectation, jazz has been redefining boundries in the same way.
    Robert Fripp's music may not have the same genre specific swing sense that jazz has, but his roles as composer and brilliant band leader is very much in the spirit of where a lot of improvisational music is going.
    I like seeing discussions of musicians in non-jazz traditions like Bowie, Zappa, late era Miles... who are using the talents of great jazz and exploratory musicians to make music that redefines what can be done. It was great to see Bowie work with Ben Monder, Zappa working with Archie Shepp, Fripp working with Adrian Belew. I've long wondered what a collaboration with Bill Frisell would wind up being.

    David
    Wow, Fripp and Frisell sounds like an amazing combination!

    However, I’m impressed by Fripp’s work on Peter Gabriel’s ”Solsbury Hill” from 1977.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    Thanks Eric—2 of my favorite musicians. Makes me appreciate them even more. A very insightful interview to say the least.

    I actually saw both of these great guitarists about the time that interview occurred...1981-2. Fripp played with the rebooted King Crimson, and McLaughlin was in his Belo Horizonte phase—the lovely Katia Labeque on keyboards. For Crimson we were dancing just below the stage, about 20 feet away. For McLaughlin my GF and I had a table also about 20 feet away. Both were magical experiences.
    Last edited by Doctor Jeff; 06-15-2019 at 08:53 AM.
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Bbmaj7#5#9 View Post
    Wow, Fripp and Frisell sounds like an amazing combination!

    However, I’m impressed by Fripp’s work on Peter Gabriel’s ”Solsbury Hill” from 1977.
    While Fripp did play some amazing work on the PG1 album—Here Comes the Flood for instance—he did not play on that track. That was the superb guitarist Steve Hunter—best known for his playing on the Lou Reed Live Animal album.
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post
    Thanks Eric—2 of my favorite musicians. Makes me appreciate them even more. A very insightful interview to say the least.

    McLaughlin: Can I get you more coffee?

    Fripp: I should love more coffee. Where do these chocolates come from?

    McLaughlin: They come from the Basque coast, where we go a lot of the time. Maybe one day you can come and visit.


    This is a long way from Spinal Tap.

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    I learned this song by ear because there was no sheet music, and I loved it. I play it all the time. I’m not the only one. There’s no reason why this song shouldn’t be a standard .



    Navdeep Singh.

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    (Late reply)

    Wow, thanks for that link - never read that interview before. I love it when accomplished musicians discuss their craft with other accomplished musicians, especially when they are as articulate as McLaughlin & Fripp.

  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post
    While Fripp did play some amazing work on the PG1 album—Here Comes the Flood for instance—he did not play on that track. That was the superb guitarist Steve Hunter—best known for his playing on the Lou Reed Live Animal album.
    Aha, now I learned something new. Thank you!

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    in ways a vivid contrast to American rock players talk to each other via interview format..Sammy Hager did some of that kind of thing

    When I have met/played with musicians that have had alot of "life experiences" and explored the outer boundries of any musical style..there is an isolation that seems to come with that exploration..
    that you cant seem to explain to anyone who has not "been there" and then there is no need to try to explain it..

    its not a way to see/hear/use the music fundamentals..chord harmony..voicings and all that or what to play over some alterend harmonic movement .. all that does not enter your mind at the time..much like driving fast...very fast...your not thinking about driving..you dont have time to think about it .. someone else is driving..your just along for the ride...

    at some point your only playing in one key
    play well ...
    wolf

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    Someone requested a *leadsheet* to Matte Kudasai. I'm at work and can't create one. I just figured out the melody. You can harmonize it any way you want, it's a simple pop song.

    I did not create a lead sheet, but I'll post a "Nashville numbers" system to describe the melody, as it correlates with the words. Feel free to correct me if I'm wrong. You can harmonize it anyway you want.

    The melody seems to be the same for both vocal sections, more or less. Hope this helps, sorry I can't type up a lead sheet. And please excuse the mistakes, if you see any (and correct me, please, I'm just a schmo trying to play songs I really dig).

    Still, by the window pane, P5 below the R for "Still", 1-2-4-3-2 for "by the window pane"): So, in the key of C: G--C-D-F-E-D
    Pain, like the rain that's falling. "Pain" as in P5 (one version has it above the R, or can play it below the R), then 1-2 ("like the")-4-("rain") 3 ("that's) -2-3 ("falling") So: G to C-D-F-E-D-E
    She waits in the air, Descending and desc-- P5 to P4 to M3 up to P4 to P5 G (P5 above R, "she") to F ("waits") to E to F to G ('in the air")
    Matte Kudasai. M3 to P4 ascending, then M6 to P5 to P5 descending (E to F--Matte--then A to G to G (Ku-da-sai)
    She sleeps in a chair: same as "She waits in the air" ): Descending and desc-- P5 to P4 to M3 up to P4 to P5 G (P5 above R) to F to E to F to G
    In her sad America. 1 to 2 ("in her") to 4 ("sad") to 3 to 4 to 3 to 2 ("America") C to D, F to E to F to E to D

    Navdeep Singh.

  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    My college girlfriend and I had our first date at the November 1981 KC show at the Agora Ballroom in Atlanta. As stated, we were a scant 20 feet away from the stage, moving in time to the rhythm. We went back to my place and put the album on. I will leave the rest for your imagination, but let's just say Matte Kudesai is one of the great makeout songs of all time in my book.


    We hooked up to KC's Discipline, and broke up to Roxy Music's Avalon. I can't listen to either one without thinking of her.
    “Without music, life would be a mistake”--Friedrich Nietzsche

    Current lineup: Gibson ES-135 ('02), Peerless Sunset, Harmony Brilliant Cutaway ('64), Godin 5th Avenue, Alvarez AC60 A/E classical, Kay K37 ('56), Fender Squier VM Jazz bass, several ukes. Amps: Fishman Artist, Fender SCXD, Pignose 7-100.