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  1. #1
    Jazzarian Guest
    Kurt Rosenwinkel (modern jazz?)
    John Abercrombie
    John Tropea
    Pat Kelly

    Riteneour comes to mind, but I find his style far too "pop" for my liking these days.

    I can't say I've ever heard Holdsworth play archtop. He's as much "modern jazz" as he is fusion.


    As I've said before, I'm not wild about Metheny's straight ahead efforts. I liked him in the PMG, I liked him with Brecker and Tyner.

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  3. #2

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    Tim Miller is great... His compositions are mainly fusion, but ive seen him play live a few times and he plays standards very nicely, but he puts his own twist on them... I really like it, but hes not a traditional player..

  4. #3
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Innerurge1
    Tim Miller is great... His compositions are mainly fusion, but ive seen him play live a few times and he plays standards very nicely, but he puts his own twist on them... I really like it, but hes not a traditional player..
    Can't say I've heard him.

  5. #4
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Innerurge1
    Tim Miller is great... His compositions are mainly fusion, but ive seen him play live a few times and he plays standards very nicely, but he puts his own twist on them... I really like it, but hes not a traditional player..

    BTW, Tropea does a fabulous job with Montgomery's "Full House". Tropea with Ronnie Cuber and the rest of the Blues Brothers Band.

  6. #5

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    Boston native... Teaches at Berklee... Has 3 cds and is considered one of the best teachers at Berklee, and by many considered the best... Is coming out with a book with Mick Goodrick very soon... Great player... IMO top 3 best guitarists technically...

  7. #6

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    but actually, hes very modern, i wouldnt consider his playing straight ahead at all, but nonetheless great player...

  8. #7
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Innerurge1
    but actually, hes very modern, i wouldnt consider his playing straight ahead at all, but nonetheless great player...

    I take it you get to see the Berklee wonderkind fairly often?


    Tropea was one of the early Berklee grads, being there during the time of Corea, who didn't graduate apparently.

  9. #8

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    personally... Im not a huge fan of Tropea... Just not my style...

  10. #9
    I think the only fusion player with real straight ahead chops is mr.John Scofield.everyone else is a hack or they just suck.no one can even come close to sco.(imho of course)
    except Metheny.in fact they should do another record together.

  11. #10
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Innerurge1
    personally... Im not a huge fan of Tropea... Just not my style...
    You've heard him play straight ahead jazz on an L5? He's really good, but conventional.

  12. #11
    Jazzarian Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Metal Fingers
    I think the only fusion player with real straight ahead chops is mr.John Scofield.everyone else is a hack or they just suck.no one can even come close to sco.(imho of course)
    Well maybe next year Santa will bring you some new CDs to change your "mind".

  13. #12

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    not sure if fusion player is the right description but John Etheridge covers most styles with panache

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Innerurge1
    Tim Miller is great... His compositions are mainly fusion, but ive seen him play live a few times and he plays standards very nicely, but he puts his own twist on them... I really like it, but hes not a traditional player..
    Tim miller is just awesome. What standards did you saw him playing? I know only of Fall.

  15. #14

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    How about Stern. He can play straight ahead, I just don't hear him do it much.

  16. #15

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    Ive seen tim play ESP and Nefertiti as well as Fall... Ive only seen him 2 times and these are what ive seen along with his compositions...

  17. #16

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    Tim is my favorite player, he is the one with more originality these days.

  18. #17

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    Hes really great... so unique... I want to get some lessons with soon...

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by derek
    How about Stern. He can play straight ahead, I just don't hear him do it much.
    Stern has a standards cd out that is great. He also plays standards on a cd w/ bassist Harvie Schwartz. Both are really nice cds worth looking for if you like Mike.

    =-) PJ

  20. #19

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    Corea's best hired gun is Carlos Rios. See "Cool Weasel Boogie" on Electrik Band. I believe he's playing w/Stevie Nicks these days but his fusion stuff is smooth.

  21. #20

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    Guthrie Govan is a fusion player who is really quite phenomenal.... The whole album Erotic Cakes is really good. Slidey boy is really good the nylon solo in that song is just insane.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by derek
    How about Stern. He can play straight ahead, I just don't hear him do it much.
    I'm not a huge fan, but Mike Stern has developed into a very strong straight ahead player. Scott Henderson is almost there. John Mclaughlin, Larry Coryell can do it. Seems like any of the fusion guys that want to be authentic have put in the work to do it.

  23. #22

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    Al di Meola

  24. #23

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    LARRY CORYELL!!!!


    Go back and listen to 11th House.


    He needs to get more mention on this forum (as well as Vic Juris)

  25. #24

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    Allan Holdsworth!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  26. #25

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    I was recently hipped to John Abercrombie a few months ago. A fine player indeed. I am also a big fan of Pat Metheny. I especially like his work on Pilgrimage by Michael Brecker. Allan Holdsworth is up there on my list, too, though his idea of playing "standards" is far from falling within the straight ahead vein.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by musicjohnny
    Al di Meola
    I have never heard Al play anything close to straight ahead jazz. No knock on him, but just never see that.

  28. #27

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    Hmm. As far as "straight ahead" jazz, I would pick Wes, or Al Martino, or Kenny Burrell. I thought we were talking "fusion" here...Dimeola is awesome, but I really believe that Holdsworth kind of defines the genre...

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzophobe
    Hmm. As far as "straight ahead" jazz, I would pick Wes, or Al Martino, or Kenny Burrell. I thought we were talking "fusion" here...Dimeola is awesome, but I really believe that Holdsworth kind of defines the genre...
    My mistake...I went back and reviewed the subject line...my bad! Sorry!

    I still stick to Holdsworth as being a very good straight ahead player (when he wants to be)...

  30. #29
    Adam Rogers
    Scott Henderson
    Ben Monder
    Frank Gambale

  31. #30

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    Sco fit the bill: listen to him do Steeplechase or How Deep or Not You Again.

    Chuck Loeb seemed versatile, even if his fusion was of the smooth variety

  32. #31

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    Interesting thread to unearth ...

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Patlotch
    Marc Ribot, Julian Lage, Miles Okazaki... can do it. They even skipped the fusion period, for my delight
    Marc Ribot admits to not being that adept as a straight-ahead player, and expresses quite a bit of disdain for it in a recent interview.
    Julian Lage could play it better than anyone on the planet, before he was stricken with that neurological disorder. Maybe he can still play that way today, but I haven't heard any evidence of it on his recordings.

    Like Ribot, Di Meola is another hater of straight ahead jazz, calling it "uncreative, museum music" in an interview.
    Coryell also admitted that he couldn't play straight-ahead, until he started studying it more in the late 70s. Everything he played before was fusion.

  34. #33

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    Some folks wouldn't know straight ahead if it bit them on the nose.

  35. #34

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    And now, heeeeeere's Johnny!


  36. #35

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    Agree with all mentioned and add Bill Connors.
    I've seen Scott Henderson in some small venue settings...he can absolutely tear up the joint playing straight ahead.

  37. #36

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    Frank Zappa called them gnat notes.

  38. #37

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    Allen Hinds

    John Landeau

  39. #38

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    What does 'staight-ahead' mean here? playing authentic bebop or swing? being able to play old standards? playing in trad combos? playing archtops? wearing suits? or is it just personal feeling - 'hm it is straight ahead'?

    I am saying that because I think 'straight ahead' is very broad thing...

    Fusion player playing Stella in acoustic combo with mainstream swinging rythm group of upright bass , piano and drums... but this fusion player sounds great though he does not play bebop idioms? Is it considered staight ahead?
    Mike Stern or even Metheny can tear it up in standard setting on standard tune playing mostly fusion/jazz rock idioms..

    By the way Jim Hall starting from 70s.. is he really straight head ? His soloing thinking, his melodic ideas and development are not really idiomatic for be-bop and related style..

  40. #39

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    If Jim Hall doesn't fit the definition of straight ahead, then the definition is wrong. I would also argue that Stern's playing over standards is well within any reasonable definition of straight ahead. Metheny is pertty much the single most defining figure of mainstream jazz guitar in the past 30 years....

    I would argue for a definition of straight ahead as being synonymous or nearly so "mainstream and with a regard for tradition, i.e. not pushing the envelope".

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzophobe
    Hmm. As far as "straight ahead" jazz, I would pick Wes, or Al Martino, or Kenny Burrell. I thought we were talking "fusion" here...Dimeola is awesome, but I really believe that Holdsworth kind of defines the genre...
    By the way it is Pat Martino. A musician who can straddle the genres is Biréli Lagrène. He is also a very good bass player in the Jaco mold.