View Poll Results: Favourite Guitarist

Voters
1072. You may not vote on this poll
  • John Scofield

    108 10.07%
  • Bill Frisell

    64 5.97%
  • Django Reinhardt

    139 12.97%
  • Wes Montgomery

    299 27.89%
  • Jim Hall

    139 12.97%
  • Joe Pass

    237 22.11%
  • Pat Metheny

    135 12.59%
  • Kurt Rosenwinkel

    65 6.06%
  • John Mclaughlin

    56 5.22%
  • John Abercrombie

    23 2.15%
  • Lee Ritenour

    23 2.15%
  • Pat Martino

    87 8.12%
  • Tal Farlow

    57 5.32%
  • Barney Kessel

    81 7.56%
  • Allan Holdsworth

    43 4.01%
  • George Benson

    126 11.75%
  • Grant Green

    100 9.33%
  • Jimmy Raney

    43 4.01%
  • Charlie Christian

    69 6.44%
  • Kenny Burrell

    139 12.97%
Multiple Choice Poll.
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Posts 101 to 150 of 419
  1. #101
    I would have liked to see Coryell on the list. I understand that he is not a traditionalists favorite. I like the fact that he is fearless and inovative. This is truly a great list. I find my self going through phases of listening. Right now it is Pat Martino.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    What a difficult choise to make...
    When I think about it, there are many guitarists I'd rank no 1, each for a different reason.
    Forced to make a choise, I have to stick with Grant Green. I just love his tone & feel, especially during the "Live at the Lighthouse"-period. Besides that, he definitely opened the door for jazzmusic to me... So, Grant it will be.

  4. #103

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    Larry Coryell, Johnny Smith, Charlie Christian, Eddie Lang ...

  5. #104

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    Hey Guys, The choices are awesome. Also the names the members have suggested are very good. However, I think "Martin Taylor" should have topped them all or at least been mentioned. In my meek knowledge he is one of the best that evolved in this generation. I do not have to say much. If you have not heard of him you are missing so much. Check him out. A true original.
    I apologize if he has been mentioned before and did not read it.
    Ciao
    RJ

  6. #105

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    My all time Favorite jazz guitarist has to be Miles Gilderdale of Acoustic Alchemy with Jeff Golub of Avenue Blue a close 2nd.
    Smooth jazz is too overlooked for guitarists,,,they all fall into the same catagory,,,jazz!

    Check out " Nils ",,,hes very hot as well !

  7. #106

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    Hi from Croatia, I am 31 y. old and I start to Play guitar before 1 year. My favorit jazz guitarist is Joe Pass

  8. #107

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    I'm assuming we get one vote.
    Having studied with Metheny, I was tempted.
    Of course, without Charlie Christian, Wes, Jim Hall, Freddie Green
    Joe Pass and Django, we don't have jazz guitar.
    So I vote for the guy who's moving beyond the narrow parameters of
    having to swing and play symetric diminished scales over every 5 chord -
    Bill Frissell. Kurt Rosenwinkel makes it tough. Metheny has transcended the bounderies but all of those guys defy cliche and expand the tradition.
    It's nice to see someone wave the flag of tradition but the growing of the thing is so important. It ain't the hats, it ain't the 32nd note lines, it's the music.
    chappy

  9. #108

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    Hey now.. We can't forget Les Paul or Johnny Smith!!!
    "Years from now, after I'm gone, someone will listen to what I've done and know I was here.
    They may not know or care who I was, but they'll hear my guitars speaking for me."
    -Chet Atkins

  10. #109

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    I recently posted my list of fav jazz guitarists on my jazz blog:

    John's Jazz Oasis: Top Ten Favorite Jazz Guitarists

  11. #110

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    It is simply impossible to vote for the "best" guitarist or your favorite player. It changes like the seasons. Joe Pass and Wes Montgomery deserve the respect. They were masters. For those who haven't heard him (he is a little esoteric), Tommy Crook is one of the best living guitarists, Tuck Andress (Tuck and Patti) is another.

  12. #111

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynton View Post
    It is simply impossible to vote for the "best" guitarist or your favorite player. It changes like the seasons. Joe Pass and Wes Montgomery deserve the respect. They were masters. For those who haven't heard him (he is a little esoteric), Tommy Crook is one of the best living guitarists, Tuck Andress (Tuck and Patti) is another.
    I disagree- at least on the 'favorite' jazz guitarist part. I definitely have my favorites, along with a list of POPULAR 'jazz' guitarists (to remain nameless at this particular juncture, whom I personally think are over-rated hacks who have a particular gimmick or person who 'discovered' them that made them famous...

    I also believe that for every 'famous' guitarist or jazz musician there are probably at least a dozen incredible prodigies who are content to play out and/or teach locally and never go national or get 'discovered.'

    I think few would be able to dispute that at the very least Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, Django Reinhardt and Charlie Christian were legendary jazz guitar innovators who could play the socks off most of these others... Interestingly enough, none of them were formally 'educated' musically- they all learned by starting early, playing and practicing often, getting out where the local greats played as often as possible, and having a 24-7 passion for the instrument and art...

    That can't be taught, and isn't even always 'popular' or 'famous'.

    They each overcame major challenges as well- Django was maimed in a fire on his fretting hand, Wes and Charlie came from humble beginnings and Joe began playing for his father and his friends at an inner city bar...

    They loved it and they lived it and they had that something that put them in a class by themselves- that innate ability to master the tonal and harmonic vocabulary in their own time in their own unique way.

    That is part of why they are my 'favorites.' Are there others? Of course! Do we learn bits and pieces from many different players then hopefully develop our own style? of course- but we all have our influential mentors and heroes, if you will, if we are being honest with ourselves.

    The musician who says they are COMPLETELY original is either in denial or just a good liar/ unconscious borrower. We owe each of these pioneering players a huge debt of gratitude for helping lead the way...

    Peace,

    John

  13. #112

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    Dear coleagues! We are only choosing our favorite, but we are not choosing the best... Who we are to judge?
    Jorge Barnet

  14. #113

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    so, lately i've been introduced to and start to listen to some different people whom i love greatly.
    like charles, Bireli Lagrene has really touched me. he's got some really really nice music. very complex (although it may not seem so at first) and nice to listen to.
    Jody Fisher is a truly exceptional finger picker. he uses that fast upper 12th fret finger harmonics that tommy emmanuel uses for somewhere over the rainbow. he always has a very mellowish tone to his guitar and fingerpicks as if he were playing all the parts of a whole band. he also uses very meshing (goes together) chords that are so natural.
    at last but not least, Robert Conti!!! i've never heard the name before. i'm not sure how i heard of him actually but supposedly he is pretty well known by a lot of people. just listen to him on youtube, u'll understand why i love him.

  15. #114

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    If there's no Lenny Breau, it's not much of a poll. O.o

  16. #115

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    Wes Montgomery by a short head from Joe Pass

  17. #116

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    Hello to all, new to this forum but not to an admiration of great guitar playing!

    I found myself listening to a lot of Jimmy Bruno in 2007.

    An incredible mix of technique & style.
    Totally inspiring & uplifting.............

    Grant Green would be #2, For the same reasons!

  18. #117

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    I'll go with Joe Pass. Right now, he's my favorite, but I also listen to Kenny Burrell alot, especially "Midnight Blue" and Kenny with Coltrane.

  19. #118

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    Joe Pass is the guy I find myself listening to and learning from most often, although obvious names like Django, C. Christian and Wes are irreplacably brilliant too.

    Like one previous poster, I've never really understood the appeal of Kenny Burrell. He's a good player, and a hell of a lot better than I am, for sure, but much of an album like 'Midnight Blue' just sounds too obvious for these ears. Having said that, there is a good youtube clip of him jamming with Barney Kessel and Grant Green where I think he tops them both.

  20. #119

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    Wes Montgomery

  21. #120
    Chordon Bleu Guest
    Larry Coryell-hes not on the list and so I vote for George Benson. Two very different players but both bery inspiring.

  22. #121

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    Quote Originally Posted by mf1941 View Post
    Hello to all, new to this forum but not to an admiration of great guitar playing!

    I found myself listening to a lot of Jimmy Bruno in 2007.

    An incredible mix of technique & style.
    Totally inspiring & uplifting.............

    Grant Green would be #2, For the same reasons!
    With all due respect, Jimmy Bruno is one of the most over-rated jazz guitarists out there today. The guy has chops, but that seems to be all it is about for him- how fast he can play arpeggios and such...

    there is little attention to phrasing and unique melodic expression with him as far as I can tell... He lives in my area and all the rockers who want to say they studied jazz with him pay like $200/hr to have him teach them arpeggios, modes and velocity exercises...

    No thanks. There are much better players and teachers out there.

    Picking those two guys over Wes Montgomery, Joe Pass, Jim Hall and the rest of those legends?? Oh my... now I've heard it all...
    Last edited by peacemover; 01-25-2008 at 11:04 PM.

  23. #122

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    how can you say jazz and not say Paul Jackson Jr?

  24. #123

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    It's Joe Pass for me, but Django is a close second.
    The Berkshire Bluesman with added gypsy jazz.

  25. #124

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    George Benson is the reason I took Jazz guitar as far as I have. I discovered his music about 11 years ago. I get an un-matched feeling when I listen to records like 'Bad Benson' and 'Breezin'.
    This is a tough poll, as I have so much passion for Charlie Christian, Wes Montgomery, Johnny Smith (Someone VERY important who should have been on this list), Joe Pass, and Contemporary guys such as Norman Brown, Ronny Jordon, etc.

  26. #125
    I allready have voted but i have to reply on this. In the words of Joe Beck "Jimmt Bruno is an American treasure". He said this at a show in Jersey. As far as Jimmy as an educator, someone who teaches about a thousand students including jazz teachers from 27 countrys has to be doing something right. Overated i think not, you mean underrated, He has developed a method that has made me play the way id like to play. As far as feel goes it's in each individual players heart and soul.Jimmy plays whats in his heart and soul. What moves some won't move others.

  27. #126

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    Wes Montgomery is ever my favorite, but if I could vote and recognize all these great guitarists I also choice for All them. Each of them have attributes that make them be unique.
    The list is short, I did not see the names of: Billie Bauer,Herb Ellis, John Smith,Emyli Remler, Bobby Broom, Rodney Jones .......

    SALUDOS

  28. #127

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    I voted for Charlie Christian because he did it all. Sure the newer recordings sound better and others have taken things to a whole new leve,l like Lenny Breau and Jimmy Bruno, but if you listen to what Charlie was doing, and realize that it was all original, you just have to give him his due.
    Gale

  29. #128

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    My favourite guitarist is Joe Pass

  30. #129

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    I will use the list to look out for names I am not familiar with. For me it simply had to be Joe Pass. I still remember the first time I listened to JP live in Montreux 1975 or 77 in my local library (couldn't afford records then) - it was back in the seventies, and I knew that was where I wanted to go. So I owe him all the fun and frustration I had for the last 30 years.
    If I could add another name, it would be Martin Taylor, who takes solo playing to a new level.

  31. #130

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    and jimmy bruno who i didnt see on the list!!!!

  32. #131

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    It has to be Wes for me!

  33. #132

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    Lenny Breau, Ted Greene and Ed Bickert though they didn't make the list.......

  34. #133

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    All the guys on the list are great, as well as the other thousand who didnt make the list. But George Benson would have to get my vote because no one can do it like George does it. But all of these are personal opinions about the guitarist who gives us the most inspiration and ive grown to respect each musician for the hard work that they've put in to become who they are and where they are musicially.
    Last edited by Jazzflava; 03-07-2008 at 05:35 PM. Reason: misspelled words

  35. #134

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    Although I voted for Wes, I fully recognise that there are other, different, and great players out there.

    Yet there are good reasons for my choice, even though, as someone said, he did record some pretty bland stuff once he became well-known. In the 1960s a Californian girl-friend gave me an unavailable Wes album from the States knowing that I listened to him. I forget what it was called, except that it was absolutely dire. Got rid of it when she wasn't watching! However, I don't blame him for wanting some money, and anyway, he'd recorded some amazing stuff by then. This, unfortunately, is the crap world we live in where dross is financially lauded, and genius is ignored.

    But anyone who wants to hear the latter example ought to go no further than the live versions of Miles's No Blues on the Verve label with the Wynton Kelly Trio. The album (which I originally bought in the 1960s) is Smoking at the Half Note. Wes's solo is not just about technique, but is also the most incredible flow of ideas, one after the other. When one is developed, another follows quickly on. He literally drives the trio forward. It is musically staggering (which is the important thing), technically masterful, and just joyous to listen to. Having listened to it for forty years, I know every note...although I still can't play them.

    If you've never heard this, please do. I've even insisted that it's played at my funeral (12.56 long...make the buggers listen to it!)
    Last edited by Ged; 03-10-2008 at 04:55 PM.

  36. #135

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    Just so you know, John Mclaughlin and Jeff Beck were together on stage one day in San Jose. Jeff Beck is far better at jazz improv. But the best was Joe Pass no contest

  37. #136

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    'Nuff Said

  38. #137
    Jim Hall keeps it real; but I would have liked to vote for Lenny Breau.

  39. #138

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    Quote Originally Posted by SonicBlast View Post
    my favorite jazz guitarist isn't there so i'll have to go with the next in line. has anyone here heard of Allan Holdsworth? I think he's the best guitarist in the world from what i've heard. and i've heard a lot. his website is The Real Allan Holdsworth.com if you want to see some of his stuff.
    Holdsworth is awesome...
    His technique is amazing.
    I voted for Metheny.
    His playing moves & inspires me...

    Honorable mention:
    Wes Montgomery
    John Scofield
    Samo Salamon
    and
    MIKE STERN!


    Von.
    SoundClick artist: Von Face Blues Project - My blues stuff...also some folky tunes.
    MySpace.com - Von Face Blues Project - South Jersey - www.myspace.com/ragsrandelli

  40. #139

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    Sure, all to choose from are great guitarists. I would like to add a few.

    What about:

    Angelo Debarre Angelo Debarre - Site officiel (Productions Michto)

    Larry Carlton Larry Carlton - official website

    Jan Akkerman Jan Akkerman music site • Dutch guitarist • Nederlandse gitarist

    Tommy Bolin


    Philip Catherine Philip Catherine Home page


    Next to the already mentioned these are a few of my favourite players. If your not (?) familiar with them do check them out.

    Pete

  41. #140

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    Check out Angelo Debarre with Biréli Lagrène and Stochelo Rosenberg, in Vienne.



    Pete

  42. #141

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    Hello gang, my first post. I voted Wes but I'm with Mr. Gordo on Larry Carlton. Amazing.

  43. #142

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    I voted Wes also, but i like Joe Pass a great deal also.

  44. #143

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    It's impossible to put together a poll that includes everybody's favourite - there are bound to be some great players who are overlooked and omitted.

    I voted for Django because he's my favourite on that list but I'm not sure if he'd get my vote if the list were to include Hank Garland, Lenny Breau and Ollie Halsall.

  45. #144

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    I voted for Abercrombie only because right now he's just my guy. I always have trouble picking between him and Jim Hall. Right now my connection to John is much stronger since I've gotten to hang and jam with him briefly. I learned more from him in 7 minutes then I did in a semester almost... bit of an exaggeration but not really.

    As far as Poll lists goes, I think this one is pretty good. It's again, like said impossible to really pick just 1 cat. I find it interesting that Joe Pass is leading the poll. Very interesting...

  46. #145

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    I dig Bill Frisell, John Abercrombie, Jim Hall, and Metheny. Those are the cats that have had more impact on what I do than any other guitarist.

  47. #146

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jake Hanlon View Post
    I voted for Abercrombie only because right now he's just my guy. I always have trouble picking between him and Jim Hall. Right now my connection to John is much stronger since I've gotten to hang and jam with him briefly. I learned more from him in 7 minutes then I did in a semester almost... bit of an exaggeration but not really.

    As far as Poll lists goes, I think this one is pretty good. It's again, like said impossible to really pick just 1 cat. I find it interesting that Joe Pass is leading the poll. Very interesting...

    John Abercrombie is a criminally underrated player. He is hardly ever mentioned, discussed, etc. It pains me that he is, because he's probably one of the greatest jazz guitarists of our time. Lyrical, intense, passionate, cerebral, textural...these are good words to discribe his playing.

    I'm digging his latest "Third Quartet." I own almost everything he's ever touched. Big, big fan of his.

  48. #147

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    Abercrombie is fearless. He just doesn't give a shit. He improvises. Joe pass is a completely different player. A lot of the old guys didn't truly improvise. It's a lot of block stock material. But boy, they did it well, with a fierce swing
    and a crackle you could warm your hands on. Few surprises once you understand the bop vocab. They are very different in my book.
    Even metheny ans sco don't improvise the way john does. Much respect for him.

  49. #148

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    that is a great description Mike. I've never managed to work out why, with all the swing and crackle you describe, Pass, and the "old school" are ultimately intelectually boring. I'm not dissing them in any way, I love Pass, et al, listen to them a lot, and find inspiration from them all, but.... as you say, no surprises just superb playing. True improvisation is a hard road and you don't pick up many followers.

  50. #149

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    . True improvisation is a hard road and you don't pick up many followers

    Never a truer word Bodge.

    Mike

  51. #150

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    it's those who follow what pick up the riches — same as is ever was