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  1. #1

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    My first Scofield CD was "Whatever people say - John Scofield plays the music of Ray Charles" While I guess this is not typical of his style I would like to try some more of his stuff. I really like the whole album and particularly the very funky Sticks and Stones. Could anyone suggest an accessible route into listening to more? Thanks

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  3. #2

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    I would try both of the albums with Medeski Martin and Wood, A Go Go is especially great. As well you should check out Flat Out and Flat Out II.

    MW

  4. #3

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    One of my favorites is "Blue Matter". He also recorded wit Pat Metheny. I think the album is called "I can see your house from here". It's ok but.....There is also a book of transcriptions that is VERY thourough. It has the head and solo parts. Good for analysis.

  5. #4
    Thanks for these suggestions. From the samples I could find on-line these sound good. I'll get hold of them and have a proper listen.

  6. #5

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    I personally feel that Sco has really blossomed in the past 10 years. He doesn't really do it for me prior to the late '90s, but three more goodies to add to the previous suggestions:

    Trio Beyond, "Saudade" (Sco, Larry Goldings & Jack de Johnette) live double cd.
    John Scofield Trio, "En Route" (Sco, Steve Swallow & Bill Stewart) live
    John Scofield Band, "Uberjam"

    That should cover most of his best material. Hope you enjoy them.

  7. #6
    Hi

    Thanks for these. I will take a listen. I am currently really enjoying A go go.

  8. #7

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    "A Go Go" is a good album. You should enjoy Uberjam as well, another funky one. The other two are full on jazz trio live albums, different feel but well worth investigating. Two different but amazing line-ups. And, as Matt mentioned, both albums with Medeski, Martin & Wood are good.

  9. #8

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    I am listening to "Bump" today. As with others mentioned above, I really like it as a good example of John's playing.

  10. #9

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    I always thought that Still Warm was one of the hottest albums to come out of the 80s. Omar Hakim plays one of the most badass shuffle grooves in recorded music on that one. It's a good example of really accessible outside playing

  11. #10

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    Aaah. Omar Hakim. I don't know the album you mention, Gravitas, but I'm not surprised that you mention his groove. He played a gig in UK with Herbie Hancock, Wayne Shorter & Stanley Clarke back in the early '90s. Totally knockout drummer.

  12. #11

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    Yeah for sure. I think this one might only be out on tape and vinyl... In any case here's an amazon.com page:

    Amazon.com: Still Warm: John Scofield: Music

    The samples should speak for themselves... But check out High and Mighty... His shuffle on that one is absolutely scrotastic

  13. #12

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    I suppose his output and the suff he's covered while remaining inherently 'scofield' is what makes him truly great. 'rough house' is a tour de force and that was recorded around 1980. His trio stuff with swallow then his stuff with omar hakim (still warm is a beautiful album) then the stuff with the funk group
    (blue matter loud jazz etc) not to mention his stuff with lovano, mark him as one of the greats.

  14. #13

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    Yeah Mike, that's the stuff. Still Warm is Excellent.

    I have a CD called Tributaries which has Larry Coryell, Joe Beck And Sco, all on Acoustics. Sort of an early "Great Guitars" since it's before the Paco , Dimeola, Mclaughlin outing.

    I also have him on CD doing Miles tunes with Joe Henderson. Good stuff.

  15. #14

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    The Miles album with joe is lovely. the acoustic thing i missed. What's that one called John? I have the one he did with abercrombie. Some lovely duo stuff. Man, i just remembered Bass Desires, remember that with frisell? So much, and all very different in group timbre.

  16. #15

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    Thanks for all the pointers to many of Sco's earlier albums which, I've obviously missed out on. I'll have to check them all out and maybe review my earlier comments about Sco pre-late '90s. I'd also forgotten Bass Desires. doh!

    Thanks for the link to Still Warm, gravitas. Haven't had time to check it out but I think I'm in for a short, intensive bit of Scotherapy! What a drag!

    Mike -
    I have a CD called Tributaries which has Larry Coryell, Joe Beck And Sco, all on Acoustics. Sort of an early "Great Guitars" since it's before the Paco , Dimeola, Mclaughlin outing.
    but what's the name of the Abercrombie album??

  17. #16

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    Thanks bodger,
    I totally missed that.
    Good point. It's called 'solar'. Around 83 i think.
    Mike

  18. #17

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    Solar is another classic... You listen to the cut of Four on Six on that album and you know: these guys are some really bad dudes.

    That was actually my introduction to Sco... My guitar teacher lent it to me along with some Gateway Trio records, but told me Sco was essential listening as well... I've copped many a lick from that one

  19. #18

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    Absolutely. And the way they comp each other on solar? fluid.

  20. #19

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    I have been trying to absorb all things Sco for the last several years. Got to shake his hand last year at the Telluride Jazz festival where he was the 'Guest of Honor'.

    Glad to see others are liking him too.

    I have a good 20 or so of his recordings. From the fusion to straight-ahead to funk, blues, jamband, acoustic etc. etc. He is really so diverse and tasteful.

    If you are looking for a great straight-ahead jazz recording I would suggest Works for Me. It is a beauty! His one-time dream group as he has said. Time on my Hands is another great with Bill Frisell.

  21. #20

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    CORRECTION...

    Actually Grace Under Pressure is Scofield's compilation with Bill Frisell. It's all good as they say. Sco and Frisell have such different ways to say it, but it works together really nicely.

    Sorry about the mix up.

  22. #21

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    Well, my first exposure to Sco was in 1987, when I used to live in London. I bought immediately the "Blue Matter" and "Still Warm", which remain among my favorite albums. I would suggest to try to find an AVI clip on the net (peer-to-peer), with Jaco Pastorius jamming on the "Chicken" theme. Assuming you like the funcky style of Sco you may have a lot of fun with this. My jaw is still open...

  23. #22

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    Works for Me I think is my favorite Sco as a lead albums. My favorite Scofield playing is on a Joe Henderson side called "So Near, So Far" just an amazing band playing the sweetest Miles Davis tunes. Scofield is on fire, some of the best comping out of a guitarist I've heard.

    Other recs on Sco from me include earlier stuff like Roughhouse, Shinola and his 2nd album, Live

  24. #23

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    Stay home and healthy.

    Here are two videos by John Scofield:


    Last edited by stevus; 03-28-2020 at 11:15 AM.

  25. #24

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    Thank you for posting this. I don’t love everything Scofield does, but the stuff he does that I do love, well, I really love a lot. I love this.

  26. #25

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    A lot of 'celebrities' are doing something for the virus. Actors, musicians... some chef has invented a new recipe to give hope to the world!

    I did hear a joke about this guy whose friend was rushed to hospital with coronavirus. He was put on one of those new Dyson ventilators. Apparently he's picking up nicely

  27. #26

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    Nice! Thanks for posting!

  28. #27

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    John's a treasure. His vibrato on that acoustic track is out of this world.

  29. #28

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    Nice to see inside his home. He's a great individual voice in jazz. Long may he keep playing.

  30. #29

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    What a great sound by all involved—especially John’s tone—fat! Loving his guitar too...major GAS attack...

    I‘be never seen John Medenski live but he plays the hell out of that organ...never seen anybody use the stops like that (even Keith Emerson).

    (Just as an aside, I don’t know if Sco was wearing the mask for a legit reason—he is the old guy there—or as a kind of statement, but he really wouldn’t have to wear a mask in that situation where he’s standing at least 10’ from the next guy.)

    Anyway, thanks for posting that! Much appreciated!

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff

    I‘be never seen John Medenski live but he plays the hell out of that organ...never seen anybody use the stops like that (even Keith Emerson).
    I was just thinking about Medeski's various "extended techniques" the other day (his mastery of organ stops, his use of things like wah-wah, his use of a variety of vintage keyboards in addition to the Hammond), and wondering if some player or players from the next generation are following his lead. It reminds me of the situation with jazz guitar, where in the 1950s and 1960s, the main players basically had a more limited range of equipment and sounds (which I love). Then in the 1970s and 1980s, players began to add to the basic setup--Bill Frisell certainly comes to mind. And Sco, and lots of others (especially when you start looking at fusion and ECM-style players like Terje Rypdal).

    Medeski seems in one respect to be the Frisell of keyboards, with his obsessive (in a good way) attention to tone and finding new sounds. I don't hear his range of tones in any jazz organ player from the classic era.

    I think you can find traces of, for example, Frisell's innovations in lots of younger guitar players' technique...has (or will) Medeski have that same kind of impact, or is organ just too specialized an instrument compared to guitar? I don't know all the current organ players, especially in the jam band scene. I hope Medeski's innovations get carried forward, and people don't worry to much about getting accused of sounding too much like MMW. Sounding like Coltrane never stopped every post-bop tenor sax player born after 1960.

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by 44lombard
    Medeski seems in one respect to be the Frisell of keyboards, with his obsessive (in a good way) attention to tone and finding new sounds. I don't hear his range of tones in any jazz organ player from the classic era.
    Keith Emerson did for the Hammond B3 what Jimi Hendrix did for the Strat.

    I agree that Medeski is kind of like the Frisell of keyboards. (Another guitarist that comes to mind is Nels Cline.)

    The problem with keys is that one can get so involved in tinkering with the settings that one loses sight of just playing the dang thing. Medeski is enough of a virtuoso to be able to play and tinker at the same time.

    Let's not forget about the rhythm section. Martin and Murphy are just rock solid. The music would sound like amorphous noodling without their firm foundation.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff

    Let's not forget about the rhythm section. Martin and Murphy are just rock solid. The music would sound like amorphous noodling without their firm foundation.
    Loved hearing Murphy with Sco again. I like Chris Wood a lot, but I absolutely didn't miss him at all with Murphy holding it down. Martin is so zen and relaxed looking while being so funky. He's like Jeff Bridges 'The Dude' character sitting on a drum throne.