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  1. #1

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    For your consideration: The Talking Heads.

    I was listening to the live album The Name of This Band and was struck at how intricate and innovative their guitar work was. Jerry Harrison was an experienced musician, but David Byrne was hardly a player at all. And yet their playing just gelled in a couple of years.

    Their first records actually came out around the same time as Television's, and of course they were part of the same CBGB scene. I have to think they influenced a lot of guitarists looking for something beyond chunka-chunka rhythm and showoff guitar solos...The Cure, The Smiths, U2, etc.

    Byrne and his collaborator Eno also were highly motivated amateurs who defied common convention on the role of instrumentalists and even singers, like David Bowie, as well.

    Anyway, check out the guitars. Great sound, pretty unique for rock music in the late 70's. And their artistic vision was boundless.


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Alex Weir apparently came up with several riffs for the talking heads and had an instructional video below.


  4. #3

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    When I was living in NY, I had a place on Bleeker, at the seedy end. I'll admit that David Byrne and Tina were never that appealing to me. Tom Verlaine was doing things that really spoke to me. He embraced a real love for a spirit in things Coltrane. Like jazz, there are things that only people who saw it live will ever get, or believe.
    Over the years, a lot of people have tried to turn me on to Talking Heads. Maybe I'll have another go. I just remember the real seedy old space and the sound there always belonged to Television. What an exciting time that was.
    I was working in Soho. The galleries on West Broadway threw their doors open at night and you could hear people like Julius Hemphill and Leo Smith playing on the sidewalks. Klaus Nomi would be on the bill at Max's.

    David

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by TruthHertz View Post
    When I was living in NY, I had a place on Bleeker, at the seedy end. I'll admit that David Byrne and Tina were never that appealing to me. Tom Verlaine was doing things that really spoke to me. He embraced a real love for a spirit in things Coltrane. Like jazz, there are things that only people who saw it live will ever get, or believe.
    Over the years, a lot of people have tried to turn me on to Talking Heads. Maybe I'll have another go. I just remember the real seedy old space and the sound there always belonged to Television. What an exciting time that was.
    I was working in Soho. The galleries on West Broadway threw their doors open at night and you could hear people like Julius Hemphill and Leo Smith playing on the sidewalks. Klaus Nomi would be on the bill at Max's.

    David
    That sounds great, except for the seedy part...

    Seriously, that period of NYC was great for art of all kinds. I knew a doc who went to Rhode Island College of Design with Byrne. Byrne was an artist, first and foremost, and a musician second. That's the key to getting his work.

    Tom Verlaine started out earlier in the 70's but came to attention about the same time as Talking Heads.

    I remember watching their TV debut on the Dick Clark show in the late 70's, and what a weird performance it was. 180 degrees away from the Eagles and LA rock that dominated at the time.

    I like them both--appreciate the guitar proficiency of Verlaine and Lloyd of course, but don't discount the influence of Talking Heads just because they were technically crappy guitarists. Their sound was mesmerizing and influenced a lot of folks. And when they went "polyrhythmic" with Fear of Music--well every up and coming band went polyrhythmic and world beat.

    I saw them in 1981 when they toured for the Remain in Light album--their last full tour if I am correct. I met my future girlfriend at the show, so it has some special relevance for me.

    It is one of the 3 times I have seen Adrian Belew as a supporting guitarist--with the Heads, Zappa and King Crimson.

  6. #5

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    The film "Stop Making Sense" captures a lot of the post Remain in Light vibe, but without Belew. Alex Weir is funkier and fun in his own right... And Bernie Worrell is quite special too.

  7. #6

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    Pete Ham from Badfinger. So unappreciated (for songwriting as well) that he checked out early.

  8. #7

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    Maybe it'd be worth another post for musicians who were extremely successful and influential despite being rank amateurs at their instruments.

    Luther Perkins could barely play guitar when he started with Johnny Cash--had to be coached to play "the right note" during recordings sessions. Yet he got an entire generation of country fans to start playing guitar.

    One could make the case that Dylan couldn't sing or play and yet still became an idol. As I recall Dave van Ronk mentions that Dylan was a terrible guitarist when he first met him, then a few months later he was competent and could imitate everyone else's folk playing convincingly.

    Brian Eno couldn't sing or play when he was hired by Roxy Music as what amounted to a sound engineer. Yet he went on to a very successful (understatement!) career, singing and playing many instruments on his own and others' records.

    And Phil Collins--his first singing contributions to Genesis were not promising. Great drummer, but Grammy-winning vocalist?? Who would've guessed.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post
    That sounds great, except for the seedy part...
    I grew up right around there (a few blocks west of CB's down Bleecker Street). Seedy doesn't even begin to describe what the Bowery was like in 1975. Zombie apocolypse is understatement.

    Here's my under-appreciated guitarist heroes list:

    Richie Valens
    Glenn Tillbrook
    David Hidalgo
    Cesar Rojas
    Steve Winwood
    Oscar Moore
    Slim Gaillard
    Leo Nocentelli
    Vince Gill
    George Benson

    John

  10. #9

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    Chuck Mangione recorded "Feels So Good" with Grant Geismann on guitar. To this day that record remains one of the all time perfect I-VI-ii-V guitar solos. Grant has also done some terrific solo recordings.
    Louie Shelton, Jay Gradon, Denny Dias, Jeff Baxter......
    I play a lot of atonal jazz.. . . . . . . .but not on purpose.
    Sundogg.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by TruthHertz View Post
    When I was living in NY, I had a place on Bleeker, at the seedy end. I'll admit that David Byrne and Tina were never that appealing to me. Tom Verlaine was doing things that really spoke to me. He embraced a real love for a spirit in things Coltrane. Like jazz, there are things that only people
    I was a big fan of Tom Verlaine and Richard Lloyd in Television. Even bought their cassette-only "Blow Up" live set. (On Roir, IIRC. Included "Little Johnny Jewel.")

    That said, both my brothers were big Talking Heads fans. (They liked Television too.) I enjoyed the early Talking Heads albums (yeah, albums) well enough. "Speaking in Tongues" had some nice funky grooves on it and I like that sorta thing, so I was good with it. But I still have Television records....
    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  12. #11

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    I was a big Heads fan from way back, as mentioned. But I had never heard of Television until Bowie release his Ashes to Ashes album with Kingdom Come on it. Then I had to have the original Tom Verlaine version, and worked backward to Television.

    Too bad they weren't more prolific...

  13. #12

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    I never was a big Talking Heads fan, for my taste their songs and image are too goofy. But that OP video is pretty cool, I like the groove and the sound.

    From that NYC era, my indisputable favs are the Ramones, that the band that really hit the spot. I guess I can put Johnny Ramone in the category of underappreciated guitar heroes. What he did is kinda art in itself. In one word- a stamina, that is a rare find, most guitar players spend time on developing lead pyrotechnics or being clever with chords.

    The other one, recently passed away Malcolm Young. Another genius of power groove, who made AC/DC instantly identifiable by just strumming a chord.

    In jazz, I gotta think, but one name is always Jimmy Shirley. I only heard one song on a compilation, but it was a perfect solo.

  14. #13

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    Love the Heads, Television, Let's active, the Mats...I was lucky, my pops was young when this shot was cool, got me into it.

    I think he'd say of all those cool cbgb groups, Byrne''s shot was lasting. It had a good beat, you could dance to it.

    Fear of Music is one of my favorite records ever, if just for "Cities."
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  15. #14

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    Oingo Boingo the whole band but especially Steve Bartek on guitar.

    I first saw then called The Mystic Knights of the Oingo Boingo and they had a woman singer doing the whole Billie Holiday thing and Stan Ayeroff was the guitarist. Stan is another excellent Gypsy and Charlie Christian style guitarist. They did a lot of 30's music with this setup and their horn section. Then a few years went by and they were in the background of the L.A. scene. Then the 80's hit they were now just the Oingo Boingo and they were playing all the New Wave clubs, but now they had Danny Elfman as their frontman and Steve Bartek on guitar. Also the horn section all doubled on strange handmade percussion and Johnny Vatos on drums. I saw them a lot back then. They were a very tight band and Danny Elfman was incredible frontman using his theatrical background with Steve Bartek arrangements. After that they had their hits and started play concerts instead of clubs and to me their show didn't transfer well to a big stage, they really needed the audience interaction they had in clubs.

    Then Danny Elfman a self-taught composer and arranger became on the the top film scorers in Hollywood with Steve Bartek as his orchestrator and right hand man. The Chinese restaurant I used to go to where I used to live in L.A. I'd see Danny and Steve in there all the time with score sheets and notepads going over music from sessions. Johnny Vatos Oingo's drummer has Oingo tribute band that still gigs, but he more known for the big bands he plays in, he's a hell of a drummer.

    So Oingo had a couple great guitarist in Stan and Steve, then Danny as frontman and writer, then Johnny on drums. So an underappreciated band.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont View Post
    Love the Heads, Television, Let's active, the Mats...I was lucky, my pops was young when this shot was cool, got me into it.

    I think he'd say of all those cool cbgb groups, Byrne''s shot was lasting. It had a good beat, you could dance to it.

    Fear of Music is one of my favorite records ever, if just for "Cities."
    I liked all the Talking Heads stuff, but the one that really got me was remain in light. Belew is amazing on that. As far as danceability goes among the CB's bands, I think you gotta give it to Blondie. For guitarists, the kings of that scene were Verlaine and Lloyd of Television, and Robert Quine. Also a bunch of good players passed through James White /Chance and the Blacks/Contortions. And of course, Lenny Kaye with Patti Smith. But the greatest guitarist of the early punk era was without question Danny Gatton. What? Danny Gatton was a punk? Not exactly, but he played with Robert Gordon, who people thought of as part of the punk scene, though he was really his own thing.

    Even though I lived right down the street from CB's I never saw any of that cohort, I was a year or two too young and took it in vicariously from kids I knew who were a couple of years older. By the time I was old enough to go clubbing, those bands all were signed and on the road or the radio, but they were all kind of the home town heroes. In retrospect it's amazing how brief that epoch was, really just 2 years.

    John

  17. #16

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    Johnny gives a nice outlook on all those CBGB bands around 5:45

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A. View Post
    I liked all the Talking Heads stuff, but the one that really got me was remain in light. Belew is amazing on that. As far as danceability goes among the CB's bands, I think you gotta give it to Blondie. For guitarists, the kings of that scene were Verlaine and Lloyd of Television, and Robert Quine. Also a bunch of good players passed through James White /Chance and the Blacks/Contortions. And of course, Lenny Kaye with Patti Smith. But the greatest guitarist of the early punk era was without question Danny Gatton. What? Danny Gatton was a punk? Not exactly, but he played with Robert Gordon, who people thought of as part of the punk scene, though he was really his own thing.

    Even though I lived right down the street from CB's I never saw any of that cohort, I was a year or two too young and took it in vicariously from kids I knew who were a couple of years older. By the time I was old enough to go clubbing, those bands all were signed and on the road or the radio, but they were all kind of the home town heroes. In retrospect it's amazing how brief that epoch was, really just 2 years.

    John
    Danny Gatton was playing rockabilly with Gordon actually. That's what Robert Gordon was famous for, neo-rockabilly I think is the word

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hep To The Jive View Post
    Danny Gatton was playing rockabilly with Gordon actually. That's what Robert Gordon was famous for, neo-rockabilly I think is the word
    People called it various things, but he played the places the punks played in NY rather than, say the Lone Star or the old Tramps, so he got sort of lumped in with the punk scene, at least briefly.

    Sent from my SM-J700T using Tapatalk

  20. #19

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    Big, big fan of Marc Ribot's work with Tom Waits.

    Robert Quine's work with Richard Hell was, to me, pretty special.

  21. #20

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    Yep love Mark Ribot. Richard Quine also played with Lou Reed on many albums, and they were quite a good pair. Lou is another example of a rudimentary guitarist and technically poor singer who was quite effective at what he did and very influential. I would imagine his work with John Cale and Sterling Morrison was a big influence on the Heads and Television, among others.

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by darkwaters View Post
    Big, big fan of Marc Ribot's work with Tom Waits.

    Robert Quine's work with Richard Hell was, to me, pretty special.
    I first heard of Ribot (pre Waits and Lounge Lizards) via this record. The guy (Emil Yoan) was my upstairs neighbor. He heard me practicing one day and asked me to play with him. A bit after, Ribot turned out to be a friend of a friend and I met him a couple of times before his career kind of took off. He's a really good classical and straight ahead jazz player. I remember sitting in my friend's (also a monster classical, jazz and Bossa Nova guy) living room, with my jaw dropping at Ribot's solo playing. I'll never be able to touch him technically or creatively, but I can say I replaced him in a band.



    John

    Sent from my SM-J700T using Tapatalk

  23. #22

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    Dave Stewart. Always crafting parts for the song. For example, "Would I Lie To You" has a furious energy that is nonetheless succinct. We played a lot of '80s Pop back in the day, and Eurythmics was always a high point.
    Best regards, k

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74 View Post
    Dave Stewart. Always crafting parts for the song. For example, "Would I Lie To You" has a furious energy that is nonetheless succinct. We played a lot of '80s Pop back in the day, and Eurythmics was always a high point.
    There are a few guitarists that come up with solos that fit a song like a glove, but don't get much recognition because they aren't flashy solos. George Harrison, Skunk Baxter, Elliot Randall, JAy Graydon, Tony Peluso one take solo on Carpenters Goodbye to Love. Jesse Ed Davis one take solo on Jackson Browne's Doctor My Eyes. Then a number of players who created signature rhythm parts. A lot of underappreciated guitarists whose work made songs the hits they became.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  25. #24

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    I appreciate all the responses. If you can gather from the first post, I was really thinking of people who were not very technically proficient, yet were very influential in shaping the course of guitar in music through their creativity.

    But, there are a lot of guitarists who are underrecognized.

    Link Wray just came to mind...how many people did he influence with Rumble? Just a few notes, and suddenly everyone wanted to get a distorted guitar sound.

    Marc Bolan--hardly a virtuoso, but the perfect tone and the perfect looks for the time.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by John A. View Post
    I first heard of Ribot (pre Waits and Lounge Lizards) via this record. The guy (Emil Yoan) was my upstairs neighbor. He heard me practicing one day and asked me to play with him. A bit after, Ribot turned out to be a friend of a friend and I met him a couple of times before his career kind of took off. He's a really good classical and straight ahead jazz player. I remember sitting in my friend's (also a monster classical, jazz and Bossa Nova guy) living room, with my jaw dropping at Ribot's solo playing. I'll never be able to touch him technically or creatively, but I can say I replaced him in a band.



    John

    Sent from my SM-J700T using Tapatalk
    Now that is mighty cool !

  27. #26

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    Mick Ronson
    Glen Buxton
    Ace Frehley
    Steve Jones (Pistols)

    All for creating parts that while simple, totally captivated me and created my need to play the guitar.

    Also coming to mind is Maury Muehleisen. Great player and guitar arranger imo, whose legend is eclipsed by the greatness of his partner.

  28. #27

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    great tom verlaine instrumental album..very outside...he was a big free jazz fan..loved the saxophone...trane, ayler etc

    warm and cool




    ps

    robert gordon was from early punk cb's band-tuff darts....pre his rockabilly phase...he had killer guitarists...link wray, chris spedding and gatton for a short bit...spedding was/is his main guy...

    and what a great he is...chris spedding...uk session man + supreme...early jazz fusioner with nucleus and jack bruce...produced the early sex pistols demo's...steve jones is his tone!

  29. #28

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    I don't recall Philip Catherine being mentioned much at this forum. I really love his approach and he was on some fine trio albums with Kenny Drew and Neils-Henning Orsted Pederson. One of my favorite is Something Different a Dexter Gordon album. The title is because instead of a Gordon playing with a Piano trio, he is playing with a guitar trio. Catherine's comping is fine on this album and his solos interesting.

    He also did some very rock influenced live albums with Pederson and Billy Hart on drums. I believe he played a Les Paul on these.

    Catherine continues to make albums and I just love his straight ahead sound with a edge (e.g. his use of a Rat petal on Summer Nights).

  30. #29

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    coryell was early phillip catherine advocate/cohort



    cheers

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by jameslovestal View Post
    I don't recall Philip Catherine being mentioned much at this forum. I really love his approach and he was on some fine trio albums with Kenny Drew and Neils-Henning Orsted Pederson. One of my favorite is Something Different a Dexter Gordon album. The title is because instead of a Gordon playing with a Piano trio, he is playing with a guitar trio. Catherine's comping is fine on this album and his solos interesting.

    He also did some very rock influenced live albums with Pederson and Billy Hart on drums. I believe he played a Les Paul on these.

    Catherine continues to make albums and I just love his straight ahead sound with a edge (e.g. his use of a Rat petal on Summer Nights).
    Boy do I agree...P.C. is a real treasure...what a player.
    Jeff Matz, Jazz Guitar:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/jeffreymatz

    "Jazz is like life...it goes on longer than you think, and as soon as you're like 'oh, I get it,' it ends."

    --The Ghost of Duke Ellington

  32. #31
    Ollie Halsall, who was, among other things, guitarist for the British band Patto back in the late '60s and early '70s, after which he briefly played together with Allan Holdsworth in the prog metal band Tempest:


  33. #32

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    I have always liked Pierre Dorge.

  34. #33

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    [QUOTE=jbernstein91;845411]Ollie Halsall, who was, among other things, guitarist for the British band Patto back in the late '60s and early '70s, after which he briefly played together with Allan Holdsworth in the prog metal band Tempest:

    /QUOTE]


    beloved ollie...one of the best ever... met him...huge influence....out legato'ed holdsworth

    lot goin on in this pic! hah



    cheers

  35. #34

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    Martin Barre
    Rick Derringer
    Jimmy Rosenberg

  36. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by jameslovestal View Post
    I don't recall Philip Catherine being mentioned much at this forum. I really love his approach and he was on some fine trio albums with Kenny Drew and Neils-Henning Orsted Pederson. One of my favorite is Something Different a Dexter Gordon album. The title is because instead of a Gordon playing with a Piano trio, he is playing with a guitar trio. Catherine's comping is fine on this album and his solos interesting.

    He also did some very rock influenced live albums with Pederson and Billy Hart on drums. I believe he played a Les Paul on these.

    Catherine continues to make albums and I just love his straight ahead sound with a edge (e.g. his use of a Rat petal on Summer Nights).
    Philip Catherine is also on a great Chet Baker album called Chet’s Choice.

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by Doctor Jeff View Post
    I appreciate all the responses. If you can gather from the first post, I was really thinking of people who were not very technically proficient, yet were very influential in shaping the course of guitar in music through their creativity.

    But, there are a lot of guitarists who are underrecognized.

    Link Wray just came to mind...how many people did he influence with Rumble? Just a few notes, and suddenly everyone wanted to get a distorted guitar sound.

    Marc Bolan--hardly a virtuoso, but the perfect tone and the perfect looks for the time.
    Proficient but less recognized? Or less proficient but recognized? In the first category, I would include Philip Catherine, previously mentioned, Danny Gatton, ditto, and Sonny Landreth, just to name three off the top of my head. In the second group, I nominate Kurt Cobain and Lou Reed, two among many, as well as the mentioned Ramones. And what about Keith Richards? The Stones were my favorite band for decades, and Keith came up with some great sounds and hooks. But standout guitar "skill"? No.

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59 View Post
    Proficient but less recognized? Or less proficient but recognized? In the first category, I would include Philip Catherine, previously mentioned, Danny Gatton, ditto, and Sonny Landreth, just to name three off the top of my head. In the second group, I nominate Kurt Cobain and Lou Reed, two among many, as well as the mentioned Ramones. And what about Keith Richards? The Stones were my favorite band for decades, and Keith came up with some great sounds and hooks. But standout guitar "skill"? No.
    Less proficient but should be recognized for their contribution to music and guitar history. Yep Kurt and Lou definitely. Dweezil Zappa once mocked Lour Reed for having the worst guitar solo ever, and he was a bad guitarist back in the early Velvet days, but later he acquired a certain style which was very effective for what he did.

    Keef can do a riff like nobody's business. IMO all successful rock groups must have a very good drums and bass, but for certain bands like the Stones and the Who their best work hangs on a great guitar riff. Look at Rob McKillop's tribute to Keef on the Chat page. And as mentioned above Mick Ronson and Marc Bolan.

    Did I mention Pete Townshend above? Listening to their great middle-period records--Tommy, Who's Next, etc. He was a better guitarist than some people claimed, but what really stood out were his sounds and his riffs.

  39. #38

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    Peter Bilt could play! Although, he 1st had to substitute the hardest fingering for every chord he played...



    Of Course, the Humbler... Danny Gatton, and the aforementioned Chris Spedding (Motorbikin') are 2 of my favorites.

    But greatest guitar show I ever saw was Robert Gordon at the Saddlerack in San Jose, CA ~1980..

    He had 2 guitarists, one tall, one short, both bald, both bangin' Tele's and at one point during the show
    they grabbed each-others neck and played an insane harmony lead while we all lost our minds!

    I always wondered who those Tele-Twins were... never found out...
    measure with micrometer... mark with chalk... cut with axe

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Papawooly View Post
    P

    But greatest guitar show I ever saw was Robert Gordon at the Saddlerack in San Jose, CA ~1980..

    He had 2 guitarists, one tall, one short, both bald, both bangin' Tele's and at one point during the show
    they grabbed each-others neck and played an insane harmony lead while we all lost our minds!

    I always wondered who those Tele-Twins were... never found out...

    the late great robert quine played with robert gordon briefly.. tho switching necks does not seem his style!! haha



    cheers

  41. #40

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    In case he hasn't already been mentioned, Tony Joe White



    Here's a video of a guy named James James who makes videos where he plays over records he likes so other can learn how to play their favorite songs.
    Here he's playing over a live version of "Polk Salad Annie" by Tony Joe White. This is a great example of doing a lot with a little, and keeping the groove central.

    "Learn the repertoire. It’s all in the songs. If you learn 200 songs, you will have no problem improvising."
    Frank Vignola

  42. #41

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    Mel Brown


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    “When you’re creating your own ...., man, even the sky ain’t the limit.”
    Miles Davis

  43. #42

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    Mike Campbell...who has apparently joined Fleetwood Mac.

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by morroben View Post
    Mike Campbell...who has apparently joined Fleetwood Mac.
    Wonder if he's hooked up with Stevie Nicks yet? I would imagine that's in the contract for lead FM guitarist...

  45. #44

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    Bernie Marsden, one of the founding members of Whitesnake, seems almost criminally underappreciated. In his mid-sixties now, I believe this video from 2012 suggests he was (at least then) still practicing regularly out 'n the shed...


  46. #45

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    Just my 2 pennies worth;

    Jan Ackerman - Focus
    Peter Fripp - King Crimson
    Richie Schelenda (If the name is mis-spelled I apologize), who partially inspired me to try and learn jazz guitar. Do not know how far he got in the industry but by all rights should have gone far.

  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Br. View Post
    Just my 2 pennies worth;

    Jan Ackerman - Focus
    Peter Fripp - King Crimson
    Richie Schelenda (If the name is mis-spelled I apologize), who partially inspired me to try and learn jazz guitar. Do not know how far he got in the industry but by all rights should have gone far.

    Pretty sure you meant Robert Fripp... also one of my unsung guitar hero's.

    Hocus Pocus ... what great guitar playing! And at the same time it was popular, Rick Derringer and Edgar were doing "Frankenstein" 2 great instrumentals (I don't include yodeling as singing per se...) at the same time on my crummy old AM radio!
    measure with micrometer... mark with chalk... cut with axe

  48. #47

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    very cool obscure guitar record- two sides of peter banks...by the original yes (pre steve howe) guitar man- peter banks...and with jan ackerman!! (he's on left channel - banks on right)...great album.. crimsons wetton, & genesis' phil collins, steve hackett too...





    cheers

  49. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Al Br. View Post
    Just my 2 pennies worth;

    Jan Ackerman - Focus
    Peter Fripp - King Crimson
    Richie Schelenda (If the name is mis-spelled I apologize), who partially inspired me to try and learn jazz guitar. Do not know how far he got in the industry but by all rights should have gone far.
    Jan Ackermann, Robert Fripp. Why not add Peter Banks of Yes? And Yngwie Malmsteen later? Was it called "prog rock"? Frankly, I didn't like it. But the technical dexterity was impressive. Anyhow, I wouldn't call them underappreciated. I would say they had a niche that was impossible for the masses to appreciate.

  50. #49

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    Verlaine and Lloyd have already been mentioned, two of my favorites. This solo (@1:45) from Lloyd, by then a sideman for Matthew Sweet, just kills me, because like so much of his work, he sounds like he's teetering at the cliff's edge, but pulls it back in, and in doing so he does the lead guitarist's most important job, to move the song forward:



    They also were special to me as a guitar team because when I finally got around to getting Marquee Moon after reading it cropping up in lots of interviews, I had largely been a hard-rock/heavy metal guitarist playing in trio+vocalist lineups. Hearing their work did a lot to teach me about playing inside the framework of a song and feathering my parts in with another melodic voice. Those are lessons that do me right to this day.

    Mike Campbell has already been mentioned as well. The guy can play his ass off, sure, but he doesn't most of the time, and that's so important.

    Another technically great guy who doesn't get respect outside the community of guitarists is Elliot Easton from the Cars. Like Campbell never showed his whole hand, kept his chops in service to the song (1:54 and 3:05, the last one of my fave solos in rock):



    Technically challenged? Ace Frehley was one of two (Jeff Lynne being the other) who made me want to pick up the guitar as a boy. Pentatonic wankery? Sure. But it got me to pestering Mom about getting me a guitar, because it was primal, visceral. Of course, he's widely known and appreciated. Robert Smith from the Cure is another guy whose playing is pretty simplistic, but very on-point.

  51. #50

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    More folks should be hip to Zoot Horn Rollo, early guitarist for Captain Beefheart. He was also a master of slide guitar, and funky odd time signatures.