Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    I love this deconstruction of one of the most complex pieces for guitar by one of the greatest 20th-century American composers. Jonathan believes, as I do, that to play classical music, you should be able to improvise in the style of the composer. That's not so hard when the composer is from the early 19th century, but much more elusive with avant-garde composers. Jonathan makes it possible...with a bit of dedication!







    And a performance of the whole piece by Giuseppe Mennuti:


  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    interesting on many levels...not sure how i feel about it as an entertaining piece of music..but certainly thought provoking...and as such...inspiring...

    mennuti presentation whilst formidable is a bit precious...over staged...the trouble with much serious music these days...where the music is only equal to the presentation...the noir like nuances and dramatic gesturing of the player

    all that, i cld do without..why i like records!! haha

    thought provoking stuff tho rob..as ever

    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 01-30-2020 at 09:38 PM. Reason: typo-

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Watch the first video. I like this very much and maybe will play with this harmonic concept. I like the way he plays, his movements are incredibly graceful and directed.

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Of course you have to hear it play it... this is challenging to hear ...

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    ps- i do believe that to be able to improvise in the style of the composer...in any genre!...is always a worthwhile thing!!! getting into it from the inside rather than just as an external conduit/channeler


    cheers
    Last edited by neatomic; 01-30-2020 at 09:27 PM.

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    I find it no more difficult to listen to than free-improv, in fact I find it easier to listen to, possibly because on one level somewhere I can feel there is structure. I might not have been able to articulate what that structure was, but with Jonathan's help I can begin to understand it. But you have to let yourself go a little bit, as a listener, let the sounds and sonorities just wash over you for a while. But the brain can't help but seek out structure - it's what we do. Compared to free improv, it can be much more satisying...sometimes. As ever, ymmv!

    Christian, I have no doubt that you will be able to adapt some of these intervalic movements to your playing, and I look forward to hearing what you come up with!

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    Thanks. Excellent explanation and convincing musical result

    it is also an excellent example of the use of the chord fragments I mentioned in my various topics

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    I love this deconstruction of one of the most complex pieces for guitar by one of the greatest 20th-century American composers. Jonathan believes, as I do, that to play classical music, you should be able to improvise in the style of the composer. That's not so hard when the composer is from the early 19th century, but much more elusive with avant-garde composers. Jonathan makes it possible...with a bit of dedication!







    And a performance of the whole piece by Giuseppe Mennuti:

    Great post, Rob. I haven't had time to get through the improvisational videos but Mennuti's performance of Changes is outstanding!

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    It certainly is. There are a few others online, but his recording is the clearest.

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    It certainly is. There are a few others online, but his recording is the clearest.
    My introduction was the recording by dedicatee, David Starobin. I got to know Swedish guitarist, Magnus Andersson back in the '80s and he performed the piece regularly.