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  1. #1

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    Hello, following on from the Rhythmic Needs Analysis thread, here's what I came up with; a pack of cards with rhythms that can be combined to make phrases you can use for practicing reading, making up lines and so on.

    Obviously if you want to have a go you'll need to print them out on card and giloutine them to size and I would be honoured if anyone went to those lengths haha. But they are quite fun to mess around with I think. Maybe easier to make your own with a pack of record cards and a sharpie.

    I'm not product testing here, nor am I saying these cards are a big deal, it's just what I had to do - come up with a teaching resource. If anyone says 'man, don't bother with that just learn from the records' I'm not about to disagree lol. But they wouldn't mark me for that methinks.

    Anyway here it is, with the relevant bit of my Rationale/Evaluation/Reflection thingy and some instructions for use:

    Update your browser to use Google Drive - Google Drive Help

    (Let me know if this link works)
    Last edited by christianm77; 04-25-2019 at 11:45 AM.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Brilliant idea, I love it.

  4. #3

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    I like the idea because it really works for all ages. I still teach kids fact families through multiplication cards.

    An idea to game-ify your cards:

    1. Put on a metronome

    2. Deal out two cards to each player (or four, if you want to start teaching phrasing)

    3. The first person to sing or tap the rhythm correctly gets everyone else's cards

    4. Repeat

    5. The person with the most cards at the end of the game wins

    I'm friends with a lot of music teachers. If you want to field test your idea with a wide range of students, let me know.

  5. #4

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    ls the formatting for printing on A4 paper? What's the size of each card?

    This looks like fun!
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    ls the formatting for printing on A4 paper? What's the size of each card?

    This looks like fun!
    Yes it is A4.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Irez87 View Post
    I like the idea because it really works for all ages. I still teach kids fact families through multiplication cards.

    An idea to game-ify your cards:

    1. Put on a metronome

    2. Deal out two cards to each player (or four, if you want to start teaching phrasing)

    3. The first person to sing or tap the rhythm correctly gets everyone else's cards

    4. Repeat

    5. The person with the most cards at the end of the game wins

    I'm friends with a lot of music teachers. If you want to field test your idea with a wide range of students, let me know.
    Nice idea!

    I am well up for lots of people having a go if they think they might enjoy.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Yes it is A4.
    A4 vs. US Letter.... almost like Mac vs. Windows!

    Gotta find me some A4 or see if it'll print okay on US Letter.
    - Lawson
    "Whenever you come near the human race, there's layers and layers of nonsense." - Thornton Wilder, Our Town

  9. #8

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    Almost any printer will print to A4 size, and most will easily allow a "fit to page" option. This should be easy to do using business card stock, which is prepared for easy separation into cards. I haven't looked at the size posted, but it should be possible to adapt it to standard Avery business card stock, which would make everything much easier.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Hello, following on from the Rhythmic Needs Analysis thread, here's what I came up with; a pack of cards with rhythms that can be combined to make phrases you can use for practicing reading, making up lines and so on.

    Obviously if you want to have a go you'll need to print them out on card and giloutine them to size and I would be honoured if anyone went to those lengths haha. But they are quite fun to mess around with I think. Maybe easier to make your own with a pack of record cards and a sharpie.

    I'm not product testing here, nor am I saying these cards are a big deal, it's just what I had to do - come up with a teaching resource. If anyone says 'man, don't bother with that just learn from the records' I'm not about to disagree lol. But they wouldn't mark me for that methinks.

    Anyway here it is, with the relevant bit of my Rationale/Evaluation/Reflection thingy and some instructions for use:

    Update your browser to use Google Drive - Google Drive Help

    (Let me know if this link works)
    For me its been happening at the drum kit. About 2 years ago I took up drums(studying on my own). The deeper I go into drumming the more effortlessly my time feel and swing have developed. And that's after years of playing guitar and more than enough technique.

  11. #10

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    Can we trade cards? I can already see I might need more of certain cards for some phrases !!!!!

    Will

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by WillMbCdn5 View Post
    Can we trade cards? I can already see I might need more of certain cards for some phrases !!!!!

    Will
    Haha maybe! I like that idea.

    (The idea with these is that they would output phrases with the same rough statistical distribution of rhythmic cells as the music of Charlie Parker, so that’s not an even distribution - the 8th note cell is perhaps unsurprisingly by far the most common....)

  13. #12

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    Nice idea. The one common thing I see missing within the language you are working is ties between cards/measures.
    Perhaps that is just an alternative way to play a given card combination?

  14. #13

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    I would like to know, why and how this topic appeared ammong my "subscribed to" threads, even if this is the first time I see it?!

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  15. #14

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    sounds like a good Idea. almost like cutting out measures from different music scores and mixing them up.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by bako View Post
    Nice idea. The one common thing I see missing within the language you are working is ties between cards/measures.
    Perhaps that is just an alternative way to play a given card combination?
    An excellent and engaging concept, Christian. Following on from Bako's comment, while I'm aware that presenting material in historical sequence can have its problems (both music learning and musical concepts themselves often seem non-linear), might it be useful initially to present syncopated rhythmic material via earlier styles, e.g the proto-jazz of Ragtime?

    Here are some of the most common syncopated or "ragged" rhythms found in Ragtime (the intro to Maple Leaf Rag is basically a combination of lines 4 and 2):

    My Resource for Working on Rhythmic Vocabulary-ragtime-syncopations-jpeg

    The order illustrated here reflects the hierarchy of primary beats counted in 8th notes (1-3-2-4) being obscured. I think of these as having the kind of 'fractal' quality associated with Russian nesting dolls - ties occur between whole, half and quarter sections respectively of each bar. Perhaps examples such as these with their simpler, streamlined construction could act as an entree into the more hollowed, distilled and fractured rhythms found in the music of Parker and his contemporaries.
    Last edited by PMB; 04-27-2019 at 01:09 AM.

  17. #16
    I believe Charlie Banacos used cards like this with his students... and if Charlie Banacos used it, you can pretty damn sure it's an excellent idea.

    Props, Christian.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow of the Sun View Post
    I believe Charlie Banacos used cards like this with his students... and if Charlie Banacos used it, you can pretty damn sure it's an excellent idea.

    Props, Christian.
    Did he? Be interested to know more....
    Thanks!

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by JaxJaxon View Post
    sounds like a good Idea. almost like cutting out measures from different music scores and mixing them up.
    That’s cos that’s what it actually is :-)

  20. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Did he? Be interested to know more....
    Thanks!
    The dissertation that Lefteris Kordis did on Banacos' methods mentions it - I don't have any more info than what's in the quote below.

    Rhythm cards
    This is another exercise for rhythmic sight-reading improvement. In one
    example of this exercise, one creates flash cards, each one consisting of one quarter-note
    rhythmic value (one quarter-note, two eighth-notes, three eighth-note triplets, four
    sixteenth-notes, and so forth), shuffles them, lays them out horizontally and sight-reads
    them.

  21. #20

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    I had a music teacher who came up with a...rubric? I think that's what it's called, for rhythms. Some famous composer used one for tones to add randomness. My other teacher, who is a really legit composer, was wild about the idea.
    White belt
    My Youtube

  22. #21

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    Rag time...

    interesting , 3 is aguare in Ketu , 4 is 3 turned around and depending on the accent , 1 or 2 could fall into opanije or ilu.

    ragtime is loaded with Ketu codes. In rag, it could change section to section , like how they form sections in rock music.

    ketu was codified in the early 1800's , ragtime came in the late 1800's. Ketu has preserved grooves touching back to where the people were brought in slavery. In Black American culture , these codes seems to spill out mis mashed , but not codified. But , it's the same source.

    doesnt it make sense to include a Yoruba word as a description of the cadence along with the euro written notes? If people associate a groove with those written notes, it will come alive in their head what the actual intention is.

    i think we need to know the organic roots of these cadences in jazz. To see the notes and recognize the African origin puts you in touch with the feeling , the soul of what is going on , where the paper is cold technical

    jazz is feeling, groove , soul and Afro diaspórica concepts with European harmony , tuning , any written music on five line staff, and somewhere in there is American indigenous influence , even if subtitle.

  23. #22

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    Nice tool and practice ideas Christian!
    Lots of fun to practice improvising using rhythms like these.

    Here's an example of me practicing Rhythm 7 from Bergonzi Book Volume 3.
    Playing in every bar in first chorus and then resting in every other bar in chorus 2 and 3.

    Backing Track FBlues Aebersold Vol 42 Blues in all keys


  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by hohoho View Post
    Nice tool and practice ideas Christian!
    Lots of fun to practice improvising using rhythms like these.

    Here's an example of me practicing Rhythm 7 from Bergonzi Book Volume 3.
    Playing in every bar in first chorus and then resting in every other bar in chorus 2 and 3.

    Backing Track FBlues Aebersold Vol 42 Blues in all keys

    That's great... I'll take a look at the Bergonzi book. A little embarrassed that I wasn't aware of it.

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    Hello, following on from the Rhythmic Needs Analysis thread, here's what I came up with; a pack of cards with rhythms that can be combined to make phrases you can use for practicing reading, making up lines and so on.

    Obviously if you want to have a go you'll need to print them out on card and giloutine them to size and I would be honoured if anyone went to those lengths haha. But they are quite fun to mess around with I think. Maybe easier to make your own with a pack of record cards and a sharpie.

    I'm not product testing here, nor am I saying these cards are a big deal, it's just what I had to do - come up with a teaching resource. If anyone says 'man, don't bother with that just learn from the records' I'm not about to disagree lol. But they wouldn't mark me for that methinks.

    Anyway here it is, with the relevant bit of my Rationale/Evaluation/Reflection thingy and some instructions for use:

    Update your browser to use Google Drive - Google Drive Help

    (Let me know if this link works)
    I think the purpose is great:

    "The resource is for one-on-one jazz students who already possess a firm command of their instrument and theory, but have difficulty coming up with purposeful improvised lines with a clear sense of phrasing and pulse."

    I appreciate that this is not an easy task and that your system has potential. Training sight memory of note time values is a nice spin-off.

    A student with a "firm command" of the instrument, may also benefit from dynamic articulation (accents, long/short, legato etc) as a dimension of rhythm.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by JCat View Post
    I think the purpose is great:

    "The resource is for one-on-one jazz students who already possess a firm command of their instrument and theory, but have difficulty coming up with purposeful improvised lines with a clear sense of phrasing and pulse."

    I appreciate that this is not an easy task and that your system has potential. Training sight memory of note time values is a nice spin-off.

    A student with a "firm command" of the instrument, may also benefit from dynamic articulation (accents, long/short, legato etc) as a dimension of rhythm.
    Yeah I done the exercise now lol

  27. #26

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    By which I mean I’m waiting for marking.

    If I do end up using these cards in my teaching which I may end up doing I might consider these modifications.... problem is that accentuation and articulation also varies with pitch. For instance in bop you tend to accent the upper notes.

  28. #27

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    Great idea! Can we have some examples of the easy cards?