1. #1

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    Hello everyone,

    I'm new here and I hope this is a place to ask a question like this.

    I had the chance to get my hands on a very nice Musima "Roger" from the 1950s. It's an unusual and truly beautiful instrument! Unfortunately my new favorite has a problem and it's one many among you must have encountered before: high action. The neck is slightly bended -- however to an acceptable extend-- but the more surprising issue with this guitar is a gap between the body and neck at their joint.

    I understand it was originally equipped with an old jack plug which was replaced to modern standards before the guitar happened to become mine. I thought the neck and body might have wrongly been put back together then.

    I'd take it to a luthier right away, but i'm currently in the Caucasus and there doesn't seem to be professionals to take care of it here. I'm now wandering wether i should take it to Europe for it to be properly taken care of.. Is there something i can try now without exposing the instrument to irremediable damage.

    Thank you!

    One more thing: do you really mount acoustic strings on a guitar like that?
    Attached Images Attached Images Neck-body joint issue on Musima Roger 1950s-dscf2074-jpg Neck-body joint issue on Musima Roger 1950s-dscf2075-jpg Neck-body joint issue on Musima Roger 1950s-dscf2076-jpg Neck-body joint issue on Musima Roger 1950s-dscf2077-jpg 

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    It appears the glue joint between neck block and the back is compromised. I assume those screws are not original to the guitar? Also, is that a bolt hole on top of the heel?

  4. #3

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    This model - Musima Record - appears to have an adjustable neck:

    Mod Garage: Updating a 1950s Musima Record - Premier Guitar





    But the construction of the ‘adjust mechanism’ in yours seems to have a problem: the two screws in de back of the guitar don’t seem original (the guitar in the Premier Guitar article doesn’t have them) which leads me to the conclusion that the neck block in yours may have become unglued.

    I think it is time to take it to a good luthier….
    Last edited by Little Jay; 07-30-2021 at 12:39 AM.

  5. #4

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    What a cool guitar.
    I love that pickup integrated into the fretboard. Does it sound good?

  6. #5

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    Early Musima Records, with their unique multi-wood construction (sourced from the Roger Ultra model), are seductively beautiful guitars. Unfortunately every one I have come across has that weakness at the neck-body join. It seems likely to be a design flaw. Its the reason I sold mine, after unsuccessful attempts to fix it.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by abc-hey
    Hello everyone,

    I'm new here and I hope this is a place to ask a question like this.

    I had the chance to get my hands on a very nice Musima "Roger" from the 1950s. It's an unusual and truly beautiful instrument! Unfortunately my new favorite has a problem and it's one many among you must have encountered before: high action. The neck is slightly bended -- however to an acceptable extend-- but the more surprising issue with this guitar is a gap between the body and neck at their joint.

    I understand it was originally equipped with an old jack plug which was replaced to modern standards before the guitar happened to become mine. I thought the neck and body might have wrongly been put back together then.

    I'd take it to a luthier right away, but i'm currently in the Caucasus and there doesn't seem to be professionals to take care of it here. I'm now wandering wether i should take it to Europe for it to be properly taken care of.. Is there something i can try now without exposing the instrument to irremediable damage.

    Thank you!

    One more thing: do you really mount acoustic strings on a guitar like that?

  8. #7
    I’m sorry for this late return! Thank you very much for all your replies; it’s great to have found myself on a forum to be made feel welcome to write. I’ve never participated in a guitar forum before so i don’t know how people may behave elsewhere, but anyhow, here seeming not to be a place to be unfairly (or fairly) trashed thank you again.


    Indeed the guitar has a neck adjustment bolt. Mine also has two screws mounted on the back side which appear to participate in keeping the neck attached to the body. It didn’t strike me at first, thinking of the screws as some strait-forward practical design element — some sort of “soviet signature” if you know what i mean— but now I’m convinced that you are right and, the page mentioned in support of this, that the screws are from an earlier repair (should i say “repair attempt”?).


    Entresz, unplugged the guitar is great, projective and well balanced! Actually the rather big body participates in justifying that. I unfortunately haven’t had the chance to plug it yet. There was only that day when I bought it when the then-owner attached the guitar directly onto his Radiotehnika hifi with a defective jack. With the action issue the guitar has been a bit too heavy on my fingers (if not my left hand in full) and I’ve been afraid relatively high strings tension coupled with high summer temperatures here may worsen its condition; in other words, I haven’t used it much so far.


    As a conclusion, I guess a serious luthier is what is needed. It’s unfortunate but I will do that. Hoping this beautiful guitar will be one to be actually played.


    I’m sorry but may i ask again what string you’d mount on it (regardless of the weather )?

  9. #8

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    Actually, if the neck joint holds (and if the two screws and the glue they put do they work, I don’t see why it shouldn’t, then a neck reset is very simple. You only have to unscrew the neck screw (use a clock key, I think it’s 4,5), use a shim (a thin piece of wood) and keep trying until the angle is enough to put the bridge a little extended, but not too much. Then, use the bridge to adjust the strings to your preference (or rather to what the guitar allows). Do send it to a luthier when you can, but in the meantime you’ll have a playable guitar.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro