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  1. #1

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    Body Complete ,,,,,sweet non cut 16 with P90. The New Campellone Standard Nick build-97d1fa30-bf7e-404a-997d-64f58461b405-jpgThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-592006b6-c581-4757-bd67-4f4600c13f27-jpg
    Last edited by vinnyv1k; 07-18-2020 at 08:56 PM.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2
    New batch group shot. The New Campellone Standard Nick build-22e0896c-2872-4fb1-9900-7fd2378509d2-jpg

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    New batch group shot. The New Campellone Standard Nick build-22e0896c-2872-4fb1-9900-7fd2378509d2-jpg
    What a picture.

  5. #4
    As usual not a spec of sawdust. Surgical atmosphere.

  6. #5

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    Great Vinny, but what do you mean by "Nick"? Sorry if I'm missing the obvious!

    Rob

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop View Post
    Great Vinny, but what do you mean by "Nick"? Sorry if I'm missing the obvious!

    Rob
    Forum member Nick71

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    Body Complete ,,,,,sweet non cut 16 with P90's. The New Campellone Standard Nick build-97d1fa30-bf7e-404a-997d-64f58461b405-jpgThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-592006b6-c581-4757-bd67-4f4600c13f27-jpg
    Thank you Vinny for taking the time to post these pictures. And, thank you Mark Campellone for all that you do!!

    I ordered a swing style rhythm box with a built in P90. Mark C suggested all the things he would do to make this guitar just what I was asking for.

    Believe you me, I am not by any means worthy of a masterpiece like this, at best I am a enthusiast. But, I do like the finer things that life has to offer. And sometimes I just go for it like I did with this guitar.
    I know about Mark Campellone for many years. I attended a few of the guitar shows out in Long Island NY years ago and saw with my own eyes what a lot of the builders can do. Campellone Guitars always stood out to me for his connection to the old world of archtop guitars.
    I am a guitar player that likes a lot of different music. But when it comes to jazz I mostly like old world swing jazz. In fact I am playing with a group of fellas doing Sidney Bechet tunes, and having a great time at that..

    Please keep the pictures coming as the build continues, this really is great!!

    Nick

  9. #8

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    those long island guitar shows were priceless!!...some of the greatest luthiers, players and fans all in one place!

    that box looks like it would be a great hand percussion instrument!!! lively!

    dogear p90 is gonna be great in it...have you decided on the actual pickup? an alnico v staple would kill!

    cheers

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic View Post
    those long island guitar shows were priceless!!...some of the greatest luthiers, players and fans all in one place!

    that box looks like it would be a great hand percussion instrument!!! lively!

    dogear p90 is gonna be great in it...have you decided on the actual pickup? an alnico v staple would kill!

    cheers
    Percussive in the way that it is played, absolutely!!
    I was going to go with a Lindy Fralin P90 but when I spoke to Mark C about what his suggestion would be he was all about the Lollar p90 50’s wind. It is actually an alnico 2 so I absolutely went with that..

    As far as the Classic American Guitar Shows of LI, I remember going to the last two held at Five Towns College in Dix Hills. I was young and new to jazz. I was enamored by what I witnessed. As you mentioned from the builders to the players and of course the place was packed with fans. After that I remember it moving to another place and year after year it got smaller and smaller..
    I was glad to be a part of it..
    Last edited by Nick71; 07-18-2020 at 08:38 PM.

  11. #10
    A Campellone build is a fun ride. Watching your dream come to life.

  12. #11

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    lollar 50's wind is great choice...as is seymour duncan antiquity dogear...seymour used alnico II for a little less magnetic strength...warms things up...esp if you use vintage pure nickel or monel strings!

    seymour was friend of seth lover...classic gibson pickup inventor...has great interview with online...

    lollar is generation after...equally smart & passionate...so learned some from duncan and ran...now they copy him!

    2 living pup masters


    cheers

  13. #12
    Body routed for binding. The New Campellone Standard Nick build-590a0acb-9104-424e-907f-54c484dc3982-jpg

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    Body routed for binding. The New Campellone Standard Nick build-590a0acb-9104-424e-907f-54c484dc3982-jpg
    Thanks Vinny cool ..
    When you get a chance can you ask Mark what kind of maple he used on the back n rims. Last time I spoke to Mark about a couple of specs he did mentioned it but my recall has failed me. The back n rims seem to match and I like that with this wood. It kind of flows throughout and then it hits the spruce top "BAM" and then quiets down. Sweet..
    Nick

  15. #14
    Very interesting maple figure for sure. Mark gets some nice woods.

  16. #15

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    that looks like some birdseye maple...all maple back and sides is gonna ring nicely...

    "bam" is right!!

    hah

    cheers

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    that looks like some birdseye maple...all maple back and sides is gonna ring nicely...

    "bam" is right!!

    hah

    cheers
    neatomic & Vinny,
    I was looking up some maple wood images for info on this and from what I can gather it might actually be hardwood maple/ curly maple..
    Nick

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick71
    Thanks Vinny cool ..
    When you get a chance can you ask Mark what kind of maple he used on the back n rims. Last time I spoke to Mark about a couple of specs he did mentioned it but my recall has failed me. The back n rims seem to match and I like that with this wood. It kind of flows throughout and then it hits the spruce top "BAM" and then quiets down. Sweet..
    Nick
    Nick - I thought I'd save Vinny the trouble and respond to your questions myself : ) The wood used for your back and rim is figured Eastern Hard Maple - some notes of interest:

    Just about every carved Gibson archtop I've seen from around the 40's thru the 60's used Eastern Hard Maple for the back and rim (most builders nowadays are using the softer Western Big Leaf Maple) - since your non-cutaway guitar has a kinda retro vibe, I thought it would be cool to use materials similar to what Gibson used back in the day.

    Most of the hard maple back stock on older Gibsons was flat-sawn (as opposed to quarter-sawn) and "slip matched" (as opposed to book-matched) - I imagine they just purchased 5/4" rough maple lumber (not thick enough to re-saw and book-match) which they would cut into lengths, joining the long edges to form the two halves of the back.

    Most of this Gibson hard maple had curl figure, but a good portion of it had what is called "blister" figure ( pictured below) - usually, this blister figure is relatively subtle (but still very pretty), as in the blonde example - more intense blister, as in the sunburst example, is pretty rare - it's often mistaken for Quilted Maple, but it's an entirely different species.

    The New Campellone Standard Nick build-s400-pngThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-iahvkthwv1lxhpcdeawb-jpg

  19. #18
    Ugly binding stage - next step final sanding to perfection. The New Campellone Standard Nick build-a41bc678-83f2-450b-a5ba-86cacfcf4fb7-jpg

  20. #19
    Note the round hole in the background.

  21. #20

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    Thanks Mark...

    Guitarists tend to think of maple as a single type of wood whereas they tend to recognize differences in Rosewoods (i.e. Brazilian Rosewood vs. East Indian Rosewood). This is a mistake, because there are large differences in the different maples used in making guitars and other stringed instruments.

    Mark is pointed out the difference in sawyering and matching of plates of the historic Gibson instruments. Hard Maple (also known commonly as Rock or Sugar Maple) is much more dense, hard, stiff and it can present a distinct tap tone. Most Birdseye figure is found in Hard Maple. Because of these properties, it is the most common wood used in neck construction. It can be much more difficult to carve as well.

    The North American soft maples (most commonly Bigleaf, Red and Silver Maples) vary in their physical properties, but are less dense, hard and stiff than Hard Maple. Most curly/fiddleback/flame maple that we see in from quartersawn (and to some degree when riftsawn) sets of of these woods. Sometimes when flatsawn they present a chatoyant quilted figure. Sometimes these Maples can have a distinct tap, but many times they can be “punky” and tap like cardboard.

    What is confounding is sometimes “punky” back plates that tap like “cardboard” can produce a excellent sounding instrument. Some builders believe in matching a stiff top with a soft back and a soft top with a stiff back. Sawyering can also impact the cross-grain stiffness of the back plates. Quartersawn wood will be stiffer and more stable to changes in humidity compared to flatsawn woods.

    Here is summary of some of the more common maples used in lutherie:

    Type———————————————S pecific Gravity—Hardness (lbf)—Stiffness (lbf/in2)
    Silver Maple (North America)————-0.44 to 0.53——-—-700—————1,140,000
    Bigleaf Maple (North America)————0.44 to 0.55———--850————-1,450,000
    Red Maple (North America)—————-0.49 to 0.61————950————-1,640,000
    Norway Maple (Europe)——————--0.50 to 0.65————1,010————1,538,000
    Sycamore Maple (Europe)——————0.48 to 0.62——-—-1,050———--1,438,000

    Hard Maple (North America)————--0.56 to 0.71————1,450————1,830,000

    Myself, for archtop bodies, while not historically used by Gibson, I tend to prefer the European Maples (mostly Sycamore Maple or European Sycamore) which fall in between Soft and Hard Maples in their properties. Paler in their hue, they can also presents a beautiful curly/fiddleback/flame figure when quartersawn. They also can present a distinct tap tone. The great Cremonese stringed instruments where made using these woods.

  22. #21

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    More slip-matched blistered Acer Saccharum (sugar maple / hard maple / rock maple / eastern maple - all the same thing), from '48 and '37:
    Attached Images Attached Images The New Campellone Standard Nick build-gib-l5p-48-_8671-back-jpg The New Campellone Standard Nick build-gib-l12-94379-37-back_8272-jpg 
    Last edited by Hammertone; 07-25-2020 at 07:00 PM.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by MCampellone
    Nick - I thought I'd save Vinny the trouble and respond to your questions myself : ) The wood used for your back and rim is figured Eastern Hard Maple - some notes of interest:

    Just about every carved Gibson archtop I've seen from around the 40's thru the 60's used Eastern Hard Maple for the back and rim (most builders nowadays are using the softer Western Big Leaf Maple) - since your non-cutaway guitar has a kinda retro vibe, I thought it would be cool to use materials similar to what Gibson used back in the day.

    Most of the hard maple back stock on older Gibsons was flat-sawn (as opposed to quarter-sawn) and "slip matched" (as opposed to book-matched) - I imagine they just purchased 5/4" rough maple lumber (not thick enough to re-saw and book-match) which they would cut into lengths, joining the long edges to form the two halves of the back.

    Most of this Gibson hard maple had curl figure, but a good portion of it had what is called "blister" figure ( pictured below) - usually, this blister figure is relatively subtle (but still very pretty), as in the blonde example - more intense blister, as in the sunburst example, is pretty rare - it's often mistaken for Quilted Maple, but it's an entirely different species.

    The New Campellone Standard Nick build-s400-pngThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-iahvkthwv1lxhpcdeawb-jpg
    Thank You Mark C,
    There are so many interesting variables that go into the fine art of building archtops. I find it very interesting and appreciate your in-depth answer. Even within the parameters you set with building specs there is so much you still do to achieve the individual requests from guitarists. That is a true testament to how a fine luthier as yourself can personalize tone with subtle nuances.
    I appreciate your years of experience and how it translates to your interpretation of the archtop guitar..
    Nick

  24. #23

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    Just wondering...what kind of maple is the plain/silky stuff that you see on Gibson archtops from the Norlin years?
    Keith

  25. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by floatingpickup
    Just wondering...what kind of maple is the plain/silky stuff that you see on Gibson archtops from the Norlin years?
    Keith
    Jimmy D’Aquisto was adamant that plain maple sounded better than flamed but said customers demanded tiger stripes. The best sounding guitar I ever owned was a 1978 S400. It only had flame on the neck only.

    Maple plays a big tone role. My Special is flamed and my V1K is quilted. Different voices. The quilted is more mellow and the flame more defined.

  26. #25

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    No disrespect to the late, great Jimmy D’Aquisto, but there is a lot of anecdotal superstition regarding tonewoods, types of glues and finishing in lutherie. While I agree that “flame” does not make a maple set acoustically preferable; that said, the lack of flamed figure does not make a set more acoustically preferable. Each set acoustically should be judged individually by those skilled in the art. I have played superb guitars with flame and without it.

    You can be quartersawn and be plain looking without figure, but you cannot present fiddleback flame without being quartersawn. Quilted figure only presents itself in flatsawn (plainsawn) wood sets. For a given thickness, plainsawn wood is not as stiff across the grain as quartersawn wood. This perhaps influences how it behaves acoustically in a guitar (tbd). While we tend to discuss “tone” here, let’s turn the discussion to the stability of maple to changes in humidity. Maples are not particularly stable woods compared to tonewoods like Mahogany or Koa (see below).

    Curl/flame/fiddleback/tiger stripe is a sign of quartersawn wood which is important for stability. It is simply the result long grain wood fibers undulating in and out which produces the flamed figure that we see. Long grain shrinkage in wood is minimal (tenths of a percent). Radial shrinkage on a quartersawn plate is across the top or back. On quartersawn plates, tangential shrinkage is across the thickness of the plates along the growth rings. When a back is flatsawn tangential shrinkage can run across the back (less stable).

    Shrinkage:

    Type———————————————T angential —Radial—T/R Ratio
    Silver Maple (North America)—————-7.2%——-3.0%-——2.4
    Bigleaf Maple (North America)—————7.1%——-3.7%——-1.9
    Red Maple (North America)——————-8.2%——4.0%——-2.1
    Sycamore Maple (Europe)———————7.8%——-4.5%——-1.7
    Hard Maple (North America)——————9.9%——-4.8%——-1.9

    Honduran Mahogany—————————-4.3%——-2.9%——-1.5
    Koa———————————————?? ?—-6.2%——-5.5%——-1.1

    Forgetting the dramatic aesthetics, it is physical stability why luthiers prefer working with quartersawn woods. Acoustically, great guitars sometimes have flame and sometimes they do not.
    Last edited by iim7V7IM7; 07-26-2020 at 05:38 PM.

  27. #26

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    It was years before I realized that Gibson generally didn't use quartersawn back plates for their 17" and 18" carved backplates. Mark's observations above make sense - Gibson was a volume producer and a business. As well, the backs on these instruments have fared remarkably well over time, suggesting that they used very well-seasoned wood.

    It makes me wonder why they did go to quartersawn back plates, which started in the '70s - perhaps the well-seasoned wood was no longer available, or too expensive. Or perhaps they were having some issues with the wood, which would result in costly warranty claims. Or the change in ownership resulted in some changes in wood supply lines. IDK.

    The plain/silky stuff from the Norlin years is quartersawn, and really nicely done. My guess is that it's Acer Saccharum (eastern hard maple), and that it was replaced with the figured, quartersawn Acer Macrophyllum (western Big Leaf Maple), that Gibson has been using since then, in order to make the guitars look fancier.
    Last edited by Hammertone; 07-26-2020 at 08:15 PM.

  28. #27

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    Sorry if the thread is drifting, but it is very interesting to learn about maple backs while we wait for the next pictures of Nick’s Campellone. I attached a picture of the back of my ‘53 L5. I always assumed it was quarter sawn and book matched. Is that not correct?
    Keith
    The New Campellone Standard Nick build-6f7d3716-91c1-4f1f-b40e-b712ff167ac4-jpg

  29. #28

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    Not quartered Keith.
    Almost all the carved Gibson backs before the late 70s were flat sawn.
    The same applies for archtops by other makers as well until D'Angelico started using quartered maple in the 60s.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    Not quartered Keith.
    Almost all the carved Gibson backs before the late 70s were flat sawn.
    The same applies for archtops by other makers as well until D'Angelico started using quartered maple in the 60s.
    Interesting to know. Just to get us back on track , talking about Campellones, here are the backs of mine (sadly the blonde one is gone)
    Keith
    The New Campellone Standard Nick build-897d77d0-5782-4701-a5fc-318db373be35-jpgThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-a2aa0dbb-71bf-4e11-bdf0-7ffbb154b3cf-jpg

  31. #30

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    And here is another Campellone Special that I tried to buy, but I procrastinated for one day and someone else beat me to it.
    Keith
    The New Campellone Standard Nick build-90559205-87d3-4680-aeae-f63ddb5a55a1-jpg

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by wintermoon
    Not quartered Keith. Almost all the carved Gibson backs before the late 70s were flat sawn. The same applies for archtops by other makers as well until D'Angelico started using quartered maple in the 60s.
    The same does not apply for carved-back archtops made by European makers, who typically used quartersawn and bookmatched back plates.
    Attached Images Attached Images The New Campellone Standard Nick build-dscf9229-jpg 
    Last edited by Hammertone; 07-26-2020 at 11:46 PM.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone
    The same does not apply for carved-back archtops made by European makers, who typically used quartersawn and bookmatched back plates.
    Nice Roger back!

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by floatingpickup View Post
    Interesting to know. Just to get us back on track , talking about Campellones, here are the backs of mine (sadly the blonde one is gone)
    Keith
    The New Campellone Standard Nick build-897d77d0-5782-4701-a5fc-318db373be35-jpgThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-a2aa0dbb-71bf-4e11-bdf0-7ffbb154b3cf-jpg
    the back on that sunburst is so beautiful it should be considered illegal!

  35. #34

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    I never imagined that if I owned an L5 that something could make me feel like I really didn't own guitar royalty... these Campellone threads are really stirring me up in the wrongest kind of way!

  36. #35
    The New Campellone Standard Nick build-4827009c-3c96-4847-8499-17d856b49412-jpgThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-84d869e2-e6c6-4c7b-962f-fb0b048baccd-jpgThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-e0977480-820d-41ba-91f1-9f515d532765-jpgThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-02868e93-79e3-429c-bc4b-c49d63dcd276-jpg

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone View Post
    I never imagined that if I owned an L5 that something could make me feel like I really didn't own guitar royalty... these Campellone threads are really stirring me up in the wrongest kind of way!
    Carpe diem, dood. You can have Mark make you a nice Deluxe for a mere $6,750, or just buy this one, less than a year old, for $5,800:
    Campellone Deluxe (mounted pickup)

  38. #37
    Body complete The New Campellone Standard Nick build-4bc57155-a790-49a2-9ca5-f1a5582b1ab0-jpgThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-bac7afae-bd2f-4818-a262-787752034390-jpg

  39. #38

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    [QUOTE=vinnyv1k;1051106]Body complete The New Campellone Standard Nick build-4bc57155-a790-49a2-9ca5-f1a5582b1ab0-jpgThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-bac7afae-bd2f-4818-a262-787752034390-jpg[/QUOTE

    Vinny,
    Thank You Kindly, for keeping up appearances with this beauty!!

    back on track
    Nick71

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone View Post
    It was years before I realized that Gibson generally didn't use quartersawn back plates for their 17" and 18" carved backplates. Mark's observations above make sense - Gibson was a volume producer and a business. As well, the backs on these instruments have fared remarkably well over time, suggesting that they used very well-seasoned wood.

    It makes me wonder why they did go to quartersawn back plates, which started in the '70s - perhaps the well-seasoned wood was no longer available, or too expensive. Or perhaps they were having some issues with the wood, which would result in costly warranty claims. Or the change in ownership resulted in some changes in wood supply lines. IDK.

    The plain/silky stuff from the Norlin years is quartersawn, and really nicely done. My guess is that it's Acer Saccharum (eastern hard maple), and that it was replaced with the figured, quartersawn Acer Macrophyllum (western Big Leaf Maple), that Gibson has been using since then, in order to make the guitars look fancier.
    Hammer - I've often wondered, too, why Gibson used that plain quarter-sawn maple during the Norlin era (and I agree - looks like eastern hard maple). Since quarter-sawn lumber is generally more expensive than flat-sawn (due to less yield and more waste from each log), I tend to doubt it was a cost saving measure. Maybe the greater stability of quarter-sawn stock (less likely to cup or twist during drying) eliminated some production problems they had using flat-sawn stock.

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nick71 View Post
    Thanks Vinny cool ..
    When you get a chance can you ask Mark what kind of maple he used on the back n rims. Last time I spoke to Mark about a couple of specs he did mentioned it but my recall has failed me. The back n rims seem to match and I like that with this wood. It kind of flows throughout and then it hits the spruce top "BAM" and then quiets down. Sweet..
    Nick
    And getting back to Nick's guitar - the maple back has a combination of curl and blister figure, like many older Gibsons - not really visible in the pics at this point, but it should show up better with the finish application. The back is medium grade stock, so the figure is subtle - the rims are fancier, with fairly heavy blister figure.

    Interestingly, while Gibson used LOTS of blister maple in the past, nowadays it's REALLY hard to come by.

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone View Post
    More slip-matched blistered Acer Saccharum (sugar maple / hard maple / rock maple / eastern maple - all the same thing), from '48 and '37:
    A couple of examples of 'super blister' older Gibsons -

    The New Campellone Standard Nick build-l5-back-jpgThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-s-l1600-jpg

  43. #42

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    Did some say blister?
    Attached Images Attached Images The New Campellone Standard Nick build-epi-emp-blister_6270-jpg 

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by MCampellone View Post
    Hammer - I've often wondered, too, why Gibson used that plain quarter-sawn maple during the Norlin era (and I agree - looks like eastern hard maple). Since quarter-sawn lumber is generally more expensive than flat-sawn (due to less yield and more waste from each log), I tend to doubt it was a cost saving measure. Maybe the greater stability of quarter-sawn stock (less likely to cup or twist during drying) eliminated some production problems they had using flat-sawn stock.
    Given the general stupidity and avarice of the owners of Gibson at the time, I could easily see them cutting corners on how they processed the wood, which may have created a problem that previously had not existed, then changing the wood supply to solve that problem and possibly avoid future warranty claims, then playing some accounting game to justify the higher cost of that wood, then firing some people, then giving themselves big bonuses, and so on... truly a bunch of arrogant pricks. All meaningless and useless speculation on my part, of course, except for the arrogant pricks part. I can only imagine what the experienced Gibson employees thought of these wankers.

    But, back to the guitar you are building. Moving on to happy thoughts, I look forward to more photo evidence of its loveliness. Sunburst finish of some sort?

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone View Post
    Given the general stupidity and avarice of the owners of Gibson at the time, I could easily see them cutting corners on how they processed the wood, which may have created a problem that previously had not existed, then changing the wood supply to solve that problem and possibly avoid future warranty claims, then playing some accounting game to justify the higher cost of that wood, then firing some people, then giving themselves big bonuses, and so on... truly a bunch of arrogant pricks. All meaningless and useless speculation on my part, of course, except for the arrogant pricks part. I can only imagine what the experienced Gibson employees thought of these wankers.

    But, back to the guitar you are building. Moving on to happy thoughts, I look forward to more photo evidence of its loveliness. Sunburst finish of some sort?
    Well, your Gibson tirade was at least worth a chuckle : )
    This 16" non-cut will be getting the antique natural finish - should look nice!

  46. #45
    On to the neck The New Campellone Standard Nick build-15a71dd9-f5d9-41ee-bd07-da31f58f0427-jpgThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-87980ab1-2dd1-41d3-81c9-cd5a45f71a11-jpg

  47. #46

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    Beautiful ! Still no dust in sight , just a beautiful oil rubbed work bench acting as a backdrop to upcoming enjoyment.

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k View Post
    On to the neck The New Campellone Standard Nick build-15a71dd9-f5d9-41ee-bd07-da31f58f0427-jpgThe New Campellone Standard Nick build-87980ab1-2dd1-41d3-81c9-cd5a45f71a11-jpg
    You do not see to many rosewood fretboards on Campellone’s in general. This rosewood board, which looks great by the way, with its partnered rosewood bridge will add to its old world feel and sound..

    Thank you Vinny and Mark C. for the update.
    Last edited by Nick71; 07-31-2020 at 04:40 PM.

  49. #48

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    That workbench by itself looks like it should be a guitar. It’s beautiful!

  50. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by MCampellone View Post
    Well, your Gibson tirade was at least worth a chuckle : )
    This 16" non-cut will be getting the antique natural finish - should look nice!
    I'm here all week. Enjoy the veal!

  51. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hammertone View Post
    Given the general stupidity and avarice of the owners of Gibson at the time, I could easily see them cutting corners on how they processed the wood, which may have created a problem that previously had not existed, then changing the wood supply to solve that problem and possibly avoid future warranty claims, then playing some accounting game to justify the higher cost of that wood, then firing some people, then giving themselves big bonuses, and so on... truly a bunch of arrogant pricks. All meaningless and useless speculation on my part, of course, except for the arrogant pricks part. I can only imagine what the experienced Gibson employees thought of these wankers.

    But, back to the guitar you are building. Moving on to happy thoughts, I look forward to more photo evidence of its loveliness. Sunburst finish of some sort?
    I think you’re being a little hard on Gibson in the Norlin days. I visited the old plant on Parsons St. a couple of times in the early 1970’s. I toured the plant, played guitars, talked to many employees and bought some OEM parts and accessories. We were treated well and they even allowed my father to buy a one-off noncut L5 that they had built built for a NAMM show. Everyone I met was proud of their work and they were building many beautiful guitars. While there, I spent some time with Bill Lawrence, who was working with Gibson on a prototype, which eventually became the L6S. Obviously, some of their “innovations” didn’t catch on, but I always remind myself what music and the music business was like at the time. I believe Gibson was just trying to satisfy customers’ expectations. No one knew at the time that the vintage craze was coming and everyone would want the old guitars again. I have owned a number of really fine Norlin-era Gibsons and have great memories of my visits to Kalamazoo.
    Keith