Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Posts 51 to 96 of 96
  1. #51

    User Info Menu

    I really feel that it's about the whole package, including the guitar, strings, pick, amp electronics, cabinet (esp. open back vs. closed), speaker and positioning. I have the "prototype" v1 (no serial number) Henriksen/Sound Island "Alfresco" with the older Gen 1 electronics (but which includes a nifty phase reversal switch) and mediocre reverb, and a Weber "Black Shuck" speaker. The package of 12" open back with that speaker works really well with guitars that are not too dark sounding (and is more forgiving re: positioning with guitars that are not very deep). I don't think it tries to be tube-y at all and yet it kind of succeeds in doing so i.e. gets some nice mild overdrive when pushed, and by this point there have been quite a few newer and probably better electronics that have come out. I've gone through a lot of amps, including some tube amps, and for me this now somewhat-dated v1 Alfresco just works well enough all things considered. A bit heavy but being compact and SS transportation is not too bad.

    I do think that some of the unique sound we associate with tube amps come from the fact that they are usually open-back rather than closed back like most SS amps. I like how the Henriksen Blu (and perhaps the new Ten?) have a tweeter; that extra little bit of dispersion helps them sound a bit more like open back amps IMO.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

    User Info Menu

    And also the tweeter makes them usable with acoustic guitars (or supports greatly the acoustic-round strings type of sound in archtops too) which is a great added value!

  4. #53

    User Info Menu

    My 2 cents ....

    two different things are going on here
    which sometimes are conflated

    1 Clean jazz sounds

    the amp doesn't matter that much other than
    that it's big enough and will drive the speaker load ok
    ie with a decent EQ on board or pedal you can usually tweek it to
    get your sound

    the speaker/cabinet will however have a large effect on the sound
    character , timber , disspertion etc

    2 dirt and 'hair' and overdriven sounds

    the way the amp goes into overdrive and the
    type of distorted sounds is MUCH more complex
    than 1 above
    this explanes why so many players who want some dirt
    in their sounds are so particular about their amps
    fair doos

    the speaker/enclosure will have all the above factors
    plus a complex relationship with the output stage of the amp
    with the reactive load of the speaker

    1 simple
    2 complex , very

    Most of the old skool straight ahead players like Barney , Herb
    Joe etc that played clean , didn't massively care
    about the amp they used as long as it
    spoke loud enough for the gig

  5. #54

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by pingu
    Most of the old skool straight ahead players like Barney , Herb
    Joe etc that played clean , didn't massively care
    about the amp they used as long as it
    spoke loud enough for the gig
    To the extent that Joe and Herb often didn't even use amps, having DI boxes and going straight to the PA.

  6. #55

    User Info Menu

    Getting to be closer to that age, I totally get it!

  7. #56

    User Info Menu

    I have, and have used, both. A friend and I both showed up at a jam with SS Princeton Chorus 65s and he remarked that he had seen Joe Negri (Mr. Rogers' jazz guitarist friend) carrying one down the street in Pittsburgh (hometown of George Benson and Andy Warhol and quite a few of my friends). Had a good laugh. Great tone.
    Did a lot of jazz gigs with my DRRI. No complaints. Branching out with solo/small ensemble work, my original tweed JazzKat did the job nicely, with its dedicated mic channel and nice selection of effects. But as a practical performing tool, my Acoustic Image Corus Series III takes the cake. Three-hundred SS watts, XLR channel, defeatable tweeter, 1 - 8" forward midrange spkr, 1 - 10" down-firing woofer, @ 20#, its a complete sound reinforcing package.

    I can get nice jazz tones with my tube amps, and nice jazz tones with my solid state amps. The tones are all similar, but not identical; but nevertheless all jazz through and through. Horses for courses, as they say.

    Of course a Twin Reverb and a full-time roadie would be ideal.

  8. #57

    User Info Menu

    Dialogue seems to center mostly around run of the mill mass produced tube amps vs solid state, but as the OP wonders, what about state of the art tube boutique quality amps??? I feel that the highest quality engineered tube amplifier has the finest musical tone available and can't yet be matched by solid state. Not yet.

  9. #58

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    Dialogue seems to center mostly around run of the mill mass produced tube amps vs solid state, but as the OP wonders, what about state of the art tube boutique quality amps??? I feel that the highest quality engineered tube amplifier has the finest musical tone available and can't yet be matched by solid state. Not yet.
    I have owned (and own) "boutique" tube amps.... the only difference (between boutique and mass-produced) is in the construction, not the tone. Sometimes the MP amps have a higher noise floor, but some boutique amps are noisy too.

  10. #59

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Alter
    I think the new thing is the D class amps, that huge power in tiny packaging that's so practical, with good heat management these days. If only it was possible to have the same development in speakers... alas physics!

    With speakers we can go with neodimium magnets and
    With cabinets hard poly plastic enclosures work well
    Enclosures need to be stiff but not necessarily dense
    this with class D amps a gives huge weight saving ....
    (I have that kind of rig as do many here )

    Bass players seem more into this stuff (the future)
    Guitarists seem to want "vintage" more

  11. #60

    User Info Menu

    I was talking dimensions mostly, it gets hard to get a balanced tone the smaller the enclosure and the speaker get. But 8" ported enclosures are getting better and better. I even like the zt lunchbox one with the 6.5" speaker. There seem to be plenty of giggable mini heads around these days, but it's still difficult to find and try speakers lighter than say 10 kilos. I need to try the Dv Mark 12 one..

  12. #61

    User Info Menu

    What about taking it one step further and plugging right into the PA? What is the current state of electric guitar straight to mixing board?

    This looks interesting:

    Phantom Block Quilter Labs

  13. #62

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Alter
    I was talking dimensions mostly, it gets hard to get a balanced tone the smaller the enclosure and the speaker get. But 8" ported enclosures are getting better and better. I even like the zt lunchbox one with the 6.5" speaker. There seem to be plenty of giggable mini heads around these days, but it's still difficult to find and try speakers lighter than say 10 kilos. I need to try the Dv Mark 12 one..
    yeah counterintuitively some of the new 6.5" drivers are viable for us now
    ZT
    Toob Metro
    Hennriksen bud and Blu

    good news and all well under 10 Kg

  14. #63

    User Info Menu

    Plugging straight to a pa is my least preferred solution, and not for the sound but for the lack of convenience. You're always at the mercy of the soundman and the pa/monitor equipment available. Except if working with the same people/band/venue, I'd much rather carry an amp.

  15. #64

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by entresz
    That leads me to what I love about a nice tube amp, even when playing clean there's often a hint of sag or compression that smooths out some of the peaks.
    Yes, I love that too; it's very stimulating, perhaps because it flatters one's playing a bit. Like the softer lights in women's washrooms!

    I've only just about enough experience to know the differences between both types, but perhaps that's a + from a first perspective:

    The amps they showed me when I was shopping not long ago were all transistor or hybrid models, many with digital modelling stuff. All sounded good, but then there was a Fender student bass amp from the mid-1970s; only 1 sound, but with that sag to it that's so pleasing that I forgot about the technically much better amps. It's broken now, but I already know I want that same "brake" on the attack from whatever's next. To my ear it's akin to the difference between an electric bass's "BOOONG" and an upright's "BWooNG" on the slow, low notes.

  16. #65

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Alter
    Plugging straight to a pa is my least preferred solution, and not for the sound but for the lack of convenience. You're always at the mercy of the soundman and the pa/monitor equipment available. Except if working with the same people/band/venue, I'd much rather carry an amp.
    This, X 1,000. You spend years of your life and thousands of money units perfecting your tone, only to have a stranger shape your tone into his/her idea of good, appropriate tone is.

    No thanks.

    OTOH, a good soundman is worth his/her weight in gold!

  17. #66

    User Info Menu

    Yep, and although I suppose they'll give professionals time for a soundcheck, imagine it's badly done, or completely contrary to your taste; you have to sit there and play against the grain. I don't know if I could.

  18. #67

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny
    I really feel that it's about the whole package, including the guitar, strings, pick, amp electronics, cabinet (esp. open back vs. closed), speaker and positioning. I have the "prototype" v1 (no serial number) Henriksen/Sound Island "Alfresco" with the older Gen 1 electronics (but which includes a nifty phase reversal switch) and mediocre reverb, and a Weber "Black Shuck" speaker. The package of 12" open back with that speaker works really well with guitars that are not too dark sounding (and is more forgiving re: positioning with guitars that are not very deep). I don't think it tries to be tube-y at all and yet it kind of succeeds in doing so i.e. gets some nice mild overdrive when pushed, and by this point there have been quite a few newer and probably better electronics that have come out. I've gone through a lot of amps, including some tube amps, and for me this now somewhat-dated v1 Alfresco just works well enough all things considered. A bit heavy but being compact and SS transportation is not too bad.

    I do think that some of the unique sound we associate with tube amps come from the fact that they are usually open-back rather than closed back like most SS amps. I like how the Henriksen Blu (and perhaps the new Ten?) have a tweeter; that extra little bit of dispersion helps them sound a bit more like open back amps IMO.
    Nothing wrong with earlier Henrikens IMO. BTW, the Alfresco isn't exactly Gen 1, as there were earlier 60 watt models before the 100 watt then 120 watt models IIRC. I have an older Henriksen 110ER (with tweeter). At 25 pounds, it was considered a very light gig worthy amp just a few years ago !!! And it still is. I bet if you do an A B test between one of the older Henriksen amps and their newest offering, you would find they sound more similar than different. I mean, they are building on success after all.

  19. #68

    User Info Menu

    I agree that there is a subtle elastic quality to tube amps. Attack is a little compressed yet the dynamics are still strong. Oddly they are punchy and compressed at the same time. Compression comes first, punch comes after. Dynamics are less linear than SS amps too. Different frequencies are emphasized as the sound reaches the higher volume end of the dynamics. These are subtle in low volume, clean playing but still there.

    However many of the high end "Jazz amps" aren't necessarily going for that feel. OP does not make a distinction between "non-tube" technologies that try to emulate the tube feel and tone vs those that aim good sound with guitar without being tube-like.

    It seems like both types of "non-tube" technologies have reached a level that can satisfy even the snobbiest of the guitarist if they are willing to pay attention. But at the tube amp prices. So it's really a matter of whether you like to push a dolly or carry 15lbs.
    Last edited by Tal_175; 02-20-2020 at 01:17 PM.

  20. #69

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    One 8" speaker is going to sound different from two 12" speakers regardless of the amp driving them. I have a Vibrolux Reverb from ~1980 or so, with two 10" speakers. I've played the same guitar through it, through an AI Clarus/RE Stealth 10, and the Clarus through the speakers of the VR. They all sound different. Better is entirely subjective, and my preferences aren't anyone else's, but my least favorite of these is the VR. The Clarus sounds better to me through the VR cabinet than the VR amp. The cabinet certainly makes a difference, but so does the amp, and everyone is free to vote with their pocketbook.
    But if you use two separate FRFR cabinets with a single 8" speaker in each, it's a different kettle of fish. When I want an open cab sound, I've found that a fill speaker in addition to a primary makes quite a difference which is interesting.

  21. #70

    User Info Menu

    Horses for courses, they say.
    I play everything from ZT Lunchbox to vintage tube amps to modern Marshall stacks, depending on the job.

    For gigs I can use roadies and stage crew, I usually have’em bring and set up my Mesa Mark I RI combo.
    Otherwise, I usually get my choice of back line; AC 15/30.

    For smaller, fun gigs, I may bring a 5E3, but most of the time just a simple SS amp will do; I have a garrison of ss amps from Vox Pathfinder 15R to Quilters to Gibson G-20 to all kinds of odd Fenders, and etc.
    Love my Clark 5E3, but it may not work as well as a Gibson G-20 for some jobs/rooms, and vice versa.

    I like’em all. They all work for what it is they are called for.
    Most of amps will get the job done with something close to “your” sound, if you know what you’re doing.

    I’m a pro who plays 99% jazz from major concert halls to jazz clubs in cities around the world, and I don’t usually want to haul my vintage Ampegs to gigs, though those are my favorite.
    So they stay in my home most of the times.

    One time, I played through a no-name, $10 “bass” practice amp with 8” speaker at a club in Seoul, Korea and it worked fine.

    And what the heck is the point of all this?
    It don’t stop me from gawking around and trying different amps wherever/whenever I can, because it’s just so much fun.
    And 15+ amps ain’t never ‘nuff.

  22. #71

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Alter
    I was talking dimensions mostly, it gets hard to get a balanced tone the smaller the enclosure and the speaker get. But 8" ported enclosures are getting better and better. I even like the zt lunchbox one with the 6.5" speaker. There seem to be plenty of giggable mini heads around these days, but it's still difficult to find and try speakers lighter than say 10 kilos. I need to try the Dv Mark 12 one..
    Your post intrigued me to research high quality 8" guitar speaker cabs. This 2x8 Quilter is rated at 200 watts and looks very promising.


  23. #72

    User Info Menu

    That quilter is cool.

    I'm a big fan of 8" speaker cabs, especially for playing with a group.

  24. #73

    User Info Menu

    The Raezer's Edge Twin 8 seems to do a good job. I don't have one, but what I've heard online is excellent, as is the New York 8.

  25. #74

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by sgosnell
    The Raezer's Edge Twin 8 seems to do a good job. I don't have one, but what I've heard online is excellent, as is the New York 8.
    Had one of the earliest ones made by Rich back in the day.
    It is a sound, but I eventually got rid of it after several years of gigging because;
    a. It was (relatively) heavy (around 30lbs, I think)
    b. Treble was tuned too low
    c. Can be boxy sounding depending on amp (slim pickings on good, light-weight guitar heads back then. Heck, I paired it up with a David Eden Traveler head for a while)
    d.Those 8” eminence drivers in small ported box couldn’t handle good 100 tube watts without adding too much compression on their own.

    Things came a long way since then, and there are more options now.
    I wonder if Geoff F. of Raezer’s Edge would offer a 2x8 w/ neo drivers plus tweeter (ER version)....?

    Come to think of it, maybe something like a Quilter or some new ss heads would sound pretty good with the Twin 8.
    Hmmm.......

  26. #75

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Alter
    Just upgrade the speaker and the Princeton does fine as a gigging amp. It becomes Deluxe Reverb territory volume wise.
    Here's three videos playing with different bands using the princeton. Didn't use monitors, no sound system on the first one either.


    Alter, have you experimented with different preamp tubes for max headroom. Do you find that there is noticeably more headroom with 12AY7's than 12AX7's.

  27. #76

    User Info Menu

    I don't know for you guys.
    But every cab with 1 speaker sounds boxy to me, no matter how big speaker and cab is.
    Everything with 1 speaker is boxy to my ears.
    Even stuff like Marshall JCM 900 wide combos and stuff like that.
    Practically JCM900, in like Fender Twin Reverb sized combo.
    It did sound pretty boxy to me.
    So I'm not that worried about stuff like 8" vs 10" vs 12" .....
    Friend had like JCM900, it did sound pretty boxy, even if it had 12" speaker and Fender Twin Reverb wide cab alike .....

    Or he did had like JCM 900 head, and some other wide Marshall combo with V30 in it.
    But he connected head on that speaker also. Same as combo amp.
    Boxy in both way.
    It was pretty wide amp, like those Fender wide combos.

  28. #77

    User Info Menu

    Boxy to me means lacking lows and with too much mids. Like the AM radio sound. Every cab can be made to sound boxy with some EQ adjustment. But I find it's easy to get not boxy sounds out of most 10 inch+ speakers with cabs large enough to house them.
    Last edited by Tal_175; 02-26-2020 at 02:14 PM.

  29. #78

    User Info Menu

    I can hear difference between like:
    1x12 , and diagonal 2x12.
    But 1x12 of any size, or 1x10 is to me like speaker problem, not construction. xD
    So I pretty much don't care about 1x12 vs 1x10 vs 1x8.
    I'm fine with all 3 ...

    Lowest option if you ask me, which would not sound boxy.
    2x10 in diagonal.

    Also ....

    Boxyness was more noticable on overdrive channel.
    On clean to me it didn't matter.

    For some reason, clean was super super cool.
    And okey. It did sound pretty okey.
    But overdrive was a lot more limited .....
    On overdrive was a lot more noticable stuff like that.

    On a blind test, I bet I would never hear a difference between:
    1x10 in DV Mark Little Jazz alike box.
    And 1x12 , Fender Twin Reverb alike box.

    I'm 95% sure that in this comparation, I would not hear a difference on clean channel with any amp.

  30. #79

    User Info Menu

    A single 10' speaker will usually have less bass, although a bigger cabinet helps. Also the volume at which you use an amp makes a big difference, as bass frequencies are greatly subdued the lower the volume gets. A great way to get bass with a small speaker is to use a closed back, ported cabinet. I have a cab like that with an Eminence Beta 10a that sounds great and weights next to nothing (it's a clone of the first henriksen 10' cabs). But of course you'll never get a 10 to sound like a 12, or 2x12s, so it's a matter of taste (and carrying..)

    I haven't tried changing the preamp tubes on the Princeton, as I think the overall volume stays the same, you just have to put the volume a bit higher to have the same result. I usually just have the volume on 5. If I put a 12AY7 it would be cleaner, but quieter too, and to reach the same volume, you'd have to go say to 7, at which point you'd sound the same. I could be wrong though as I haven't tried that.

  31. #80

    User Info Menu

    The only problem which I have with like 8" speaker.
    It kinda does sound "high pitch farty" and "fizzy" on OD. Only on OD.
    But clean is usable to me.
    I have my own priorities with cabs.
    That is smaller weight and smaller dimensions.
    Other than that I don't care.
    Since I play on clean only, it won't matter. I super rarely use OD.

  32. #81

    User Info Menu

    Re two speaker mono ....

    i cannot explain it but I noticed that

    i was working in broadcast Audio when Stereo came in
    (Yes I'm that old)
    and we equipt our control rooms with two speaker setups
    of the same type as we previously had with our mono setups

    i noticed that when working in two speaker mono
    that everything sounded better and more natural
    and real ,than with one speaker mono

    I've often wondered why
    (i guess the disspertion is more even in the room or something)

    i would imagine two speakers for guitar would also
    sound better than one , everything else being equal ....
    and indeed this appears to be the case generally

    (I however only use one speaker ,
    because that's all I want to shlep around)

  33. #82

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Alter
    I haven't tried changing the preamp tubes on the Princeton, as I think the overall volume stays the same, you just have to put the volume a bit higher to have the same result. I usually just have the volume on 5. If I put a 12AY7 it would be cleaner, but quieter too, and to reach the same volume, you'd have to go say to 7, at which point you'd sound the same. I could be wrong though as I haven't tried that.
    This is exactly what happens, I did it.

  34. #83

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Alter
    A great way to get bass with a small speaker is to use a closed back, ported cabinet.
    Is a bassport just a hole in the cabinet, or is there some sort of funnel on the inside?

  35. #84

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Zina
    Is a bassport just a hole in the cabinet, or is there some sort of funnel on the inside?
    I think a ported cabinet is defined as having a hole in it and a tube leading to the hole inside the box.

    If there's no tube, I'm not sure what the technical term is. The tube helps focus low frequencies from the back of the speaker.

  36. #85

    User Info Menu

    It's a tube, but the cabinet has specific construction and geometry, and usually takes specific kinds of speakers. The most well known one has been the mesa boogie for ages, but there are new ones like the henriksens that are popular too. I think they are your best bet if you want bass without carrying a big cabinet.

  37. #86

    User Info Menu

    Oh I see, thank you.

  38. #87

    User Info Menu

    I recall seeing a speaker design manual decades ago. Bass reflex speaker design book. It had nomographs (a kind of chart) used to figure out the size of the box, the hole and the length of the tube (port). You needed the "free air resonance" figure for the speaker. The idea is more bass, smaller box.

  39. #88

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    I recall seeing a speaker design manual decades ago. Bass reflex speaker design book. It had nomographs (a kind of chart) used to figure out the size of the box, the hole and the length of the tube (port). You needed the "free air resonance" figure for the speaker. The idea is more bass, smaller box.
    See "Thiele/Small Parameters," which make it possible to design ported enclosures scientifically.

    Danny W.

  40. #89

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Danny W.
    See "Thiele/Small Parameters," which make it possible to design ported enclosures scientifically.

    Danny W.
    Thanks!

    Couldn't be simpler!

  41. #90

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by pauln
    Maybe, but I think audiences, especially listening jazz audiences, whether they know anything about the types of amplification employed or not, do hear quality and tone of sound............ I do these things for my own benefit and in faith, really, that their cumulative effect translates through the sound of my playing something that is heard to the benefit of my audience.
    Said like a true musician who loves music, it is nice to see that there are some left that appreciate the audience & gives it all for THEIR entertainment.

    Bravo!

  42. #91

    User Info Menu

    I'm surprised that the Mambo has not come up so far .... IMHO this is the one ss amp which comes closest to tube amps in terms of lively sound in the clean area.

  43. #92

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    I recall seeing a speaker design manual decades ago. Bass reflex speaker design book. It had nomographs (a kind of chart) used to figure out the size of the box, the hole and the length of the tube (port). You needed the "free air resonance" figure for the speaker. The idea is more bass, smaller box.
    It seems to be pretty much standard design in small combo cabinets. Aer, Henriksen use such cabs. They do have unbelievable bass for the small sizes..!

  44. #93

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Alter
    It seems to be pretty much standard design in small combo cabinets. Aer, Henriksen use such cabs. They do have unbelievable bass for the small sizes..!
    very common design in Hifi speakers too ....

    ports can be other shapes too
    eg Little jazz bass port is rectangular ....

    Barefaced cabs have an interesting variation on the
    idea ....

    more Bass ! yeah

  45. #94
    Quote Originally Posted by cosmic gumbo
    Dialogue seems to center mostly around run of the mill mass produced tube amps vs solid state, but as the OP wonders, what about state of the art tube boutique quality amps??? I feel that the highest quality engineered tube amplifier has the finest musical tone available and can't yet be matched by solid state. Not yet.
    I have owned a slug of PTP, hand wired, hand made, $2500+, boutique, tube amps, and you're right. The tone with most of them is exemplary. But this tube, boutique, PTP, handwired/made, amp snob has recently seen and heard what a large manufacturer is capable of when it puts it's collective minds together (Grammatically correct?). And it's in the form of the Fender Tone Master series of amps. I knew technology would eventually catch up and this day would come sooner or later. But this line of amps is seriously remarkable. One of Fender's main objectives with the Tone Master line was to design and produce a line of amps that would sonically emulate, as accurately as possible, the sound of vintage black face Fender Deluxe Reverbs and Twin Reverbs...in a SS amp. They were not concerned about emulating the tone of any other amps. Only vintage black face Deluxe and Twin Reverbs. IMHO, they are so close as to be "in the ballpark" with their vintage black face counterparts.
    Do they sound exactly like their vintage black face Fender Twin/Deluxe Reverb amp counterparts? No. But neither do many other vintage blackface Fender Twin/Deluxe Reverb amps.

    I've owned 3 vintage black face Fender Twin Reverbs and they didn't sound exactly like each other. But the Fender Tone Master Twin Reverb series amp that I currently own is so close to vintage black face Fenders in tone that it might come as close to sounding like some vintage black face Deluxe/Twin Reverbs, as other vintage black face Fenders do themselves (if that sentence makes sense). In other words, if you did a blind comparison of, say, ten vintage black face Fender Twin Reverbs and threw a Tone Master Twin Reverb in the mix, you would have a very difficult time telling which amp was the TMTR. They're that close. It has now become for me...close enough.

    And, if that wasn't enough to sway a potential customer, the over all tone of the Tone Master series is superb...even if you don't think the Tone Master series sound like their vintage black face counterparts. It has gorgeous crystal clean headroom. It breaks up nice and smoothly. It takes pedals extremely well. It has a power attenuator...that works. It has mic and cab simulators...that work. And, best of all for most of us, it weighs just 34 lbs. I mean, what's not to like?

    Anyway, this life long PTP, hand wired, hand made, tube, boutique amp snob has been won over. There...I said it. And I'm not taking it back. Are there other amps I'd like to have? Oh yeah. A Quilter? Maybe a Victoria or two? But only along with and not instead of a TMTR. As I mentioned in another thread, IMHO, Fender has hit a grand slam with this amp. Although I've read comments to the contrary, I think the Tone Master series is reasonably priced if you consider all the features of these amps. OK...just my 2 cents.

  46. #95

    User Info Menu

    I'm just waiting for the 14lb Tone Master 1x10 Princeton Reverb. These TM amps are actually multicore computers with a guitar speaker.

  47. #96

    User Info Menu

    I’m waiting for the tone masters take over the world. More tube amps for me!