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  1. #51

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    Well, I've been waiting for my cherry 275 from CME. Usually they ship right away. After five days I inquired. They responded that they didn't noticed that I had paid. It should arrive tomorrow.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    MG,
    i got it covered.
    You know, I’m not just saying this but this guitar IS really special. And not just my particular example. Please read this.

    Speaking of evolution, just like Porsche 911’s and Jeep Wranglers, The 175 has under gone subtle tweaks over the years but maintained its core principles. The latest minor tweak (Vinny told me this) is they put spruce braces into the top of this guitar. The result is a very subtle clarity that really stands out. This guitar does it all. Chord melody is enhanced with this guitar. Clarity and depth of tone.. this guitar has it in shovel fulls. Old Folks on this guitar has a wider gamut than any other guitar I have. Tenderly sounds like 3 guitars when I play it on this 175.

    Anyone who bought these new 175’s got the deal of a lifetime. I’m serious. It is a spectacular guitar.

    Joe D
    Not just spruce braces, but Adirondack Spruce braces, one of the best tonewoods on the planet. I certainly did not need another 175, but being curious about these new "tweaked" models decided to try one out. Mine arrives on Tuesday.

    I may have to change the tuner buttons though. To me a Gibson does not look right without Keystone buttons.

  4. #53

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    They do the same bracing with the 275. In this smaller instrument I'm betting it makes only a marginal difference, but it can't hurt I suppose.

  5. #54

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    Marco you will love these new 175’s. Not saying it is better than your 90’s thunk master as I have a thunker too but it is a different beast with a very nice clarity to it. I believe it is going to be a very good fit for Hot Club Pacific.
    I think you will be pleased that you pulled the trigger. It is lively but not overly bright with tight lows.

    Mark trust me you should get one too. Everyone needs at least 1 175 IMO.

  6. #55

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    Marco you will love these new 175’s. Not saying it is better than your 90’s thunk master as I have a thunker too but it is a different beast with a very nice clarity to it. I believe it is going to be a very good fit for Hot Club Pacific.
    I think you will be pleased that you pulled the trigger. It is lively but not overly bright with tight lows.

    Mark trust me you should get one too. Everyone needs at least 1 175 IMO.
    @ Vinny I am looking forward to the new 175, but I like my 90's thunkmaster better than my 63 which is lightweight and acoustically vibrant, so we will see. A NGD post will be forthcoming.

    @Mark My 330 has the red spruce braces and I think it does make a difference. Amazing tone. I think these new Memphis ES guitars may be on a par with the best Gibson electrics of the 50's and 60's.

    @ both of you guys It is a good thing that the flattops and carved archtops are not part of this sale, else our bank accounts might all be overdrawn, eh?

  7. #56

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    Who would have thought that these 175’s would have been as treasured as they going to be?
    I mean it. And trust me, I will be buried with this 175 and my Tal - I am not saying this for resale value at all. I honestly believe these 175’s will be cherished by their owners because of their sound and playability, not because of their value.
    I didn’t know that about the Adirondack spruce Marco. It makes sense because it’s real.
    I will go as far as to say the clarity of this guitar comes with a downside. You can’t cover up your mistakes. But if you play it right, you will be rewarded. That’s all you could ever ask of a guitar, really.
    Joe D

  8. #57

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    What a great thread! Awesome.

    I was just looking at these a couple of days ago. CME doesn’t show pics of the actual guitars - is it just a situation where you take your chances and return it if it’s goofy?

  9. #58

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    3 day no questions asked return policy. I have bought 7 from them and returned 2. They sent me a free return label and refunded my money the day they received back the guitar. It is a no risk buy. Make sure the trussrod works in those 3 days even if the setup is perfect. After 3 days you bought the farm.

  10. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    Thank you all for the kind words but Joe just got a guitar. I got the happiness which is of far greater value.
    Joe is our no.1, he holds us all together. If I don't post for a couple days he is calling or emailing me to see if I am ok.
    When I was battling gangrene a year ago Joe is the one that started the post that I believe saved my hand with all of your collective prayers and positive thoughts. I am very spiritual and believe that post saved my hand.

    I love the old saying : one hand washes the other
    You're an upright mofo, Vinny ... I don't care what everyone says about you.

  11. #60

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    So, I just took up this thread.

    Had to double down on my meds.

    Well done Vinny & Max!

  12. #61

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    Wow this is so fantastic.
    Someone has to write a song about these cool dudes.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  13. #62

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    What an inspiring story, a story for the ages! Kudos to Vinny and Joe. In this day and age it's not often that we come across guys who have the courage to remind us in words and actions of who we all truly are, and are able to do so with such grace and simplicity.
    Congrats on a stunning 175. Loved the details about how Gibson has tweaked the design over time, very interesting.
    Last edited by m_d; 12-04-2017 at 08:00 AM.

  14. #63

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    That guitar is absolute stunner! It brightened my day to hear about this incredibly nice gesture.

  15. #64

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    Hi Guys,
    I recorded this video tonight. You will see what we mean by the clarity of this guitar. Every note is pure and defined.
    Something more upbeat definitely in the works.
    Joe D

  16. #65

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    The sound is wonderful. The notes have that beautiful thunk. Love it.

  17. #66

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    yeah Joe D...classic 175 tone..will never have that great room acoustic tone..but oh what a great recording guitar!!

    cheers

    ps- listened 2x more..soo nice! the muted thunk and end harmonics...classic tones
    Last edited by neatomic; 12-05-2017 at 11:09 PM. Reason: ps-

  18. #67

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    What a great-sounding (and looking! ) guitar! Beautifully played, Joe. Thanks!

  19. #68

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    Every archtop sounds great in your hands JD. A Thunk-arama arriving just before Xmas - Priceless!

  20. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop
    Every archtop sounds great in your hands JD. A Thunk-arama arriving just before Xmas - Priceless!
    Thanks 2b. I love the clarity of this guitar.

    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    What a great-sounding (and looking! ) guitar! Beautifully played, Joe. Thanks!
    thanks c74!

    Quote Originally Posted by neatomic
    yeah Joe D...classic 175 tone..will never have that great room acoustic tone..but oh what a great recording guitar!!
    cheers
    ps- listened 2x more..soo nice! the muted thunk and end harmonics...classic tones
    thanks Neatomic. I added the ending. It sounds pretty right?

    Quote Originally Posted by Marty Grass
    The sound is wonderful. The notes have that beautiful thunk. Love it.
    Thank you MG. I appreciate it buddy. I love the guitar.

  21. #70

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    Beautiful playing Joe ! The tone was very nice - especially in the upper register . I think the added weight of these new 175’s ( along with the stock p/u’s) creates a certain richness / fatness in the tone - especially with the TOM.

    Of course - as Marco pointed out these are very different than earlier period 175’s for sure. I had both an early 60’s single and double pickup PAF 175 version many years ago , and they were lighter and very woody sounding with more volume acoustically.

    I know many folks ( me included) like the earlier lighter weight 175’s - but these new ones have a certain quality of sound that’s also very appealing ( amplified ) just different.

    It’s all a personal preference.

    Do enjoy

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by skittles
    Here’s the only pang of jealousy I feel from this thread. I called and ordered Friday and they’re not setting it up and shipping until next week for me. Lucky you!!!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    That's too bad! Somehow mine got out on Saturday, just a few hours after I called. It's slowly making its way to Virginia, expected to be here Thursday.

  23. #72

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    Love it! Am I the only one who things the new ES175s seem to move tonally a step closer to the L5ces? The complexity of the tone of these new ones is beautiful, but when i switch back and forth between my L5ces and this new ES175, the difference is there, but not as pronounced as I'd expect. If I throw my VOS1959 ES175 or even the Epiphone ES175, the new ES175 sits right in between them and the L5ces in the tone character. I love them all, not a criticism or value judgment, just an observation.

  24. #73

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    Thanks Lawson.
    i can’t speak to the L5CES comparison. But I’ve been playing it for a week now and for the heck of it, I switched back to my HJS18 yesterday. By comparison, the HJS is louder, but requires more effort to get the notes to blossom. And the 175 seems to have infinitely more sustain. Once you find the groove with the HJS it rewards you with its newfound superior playability. But the 175 is an amazing guitar. It can stand up to any guitar. The recipe that Gibson’s have results in a consistently playable and great sounding guitar.
    one other thing. The 57 classic pickups never get enough kudos. They are the best pickups to my ears. Gibson gets justly criticized for the things they do poorly but they rarely get enough credit for their pickups. To me they are the best.
    Joe D

  25. #74

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    Thanks Lawson.
    i can’t speak to the L5CES comparison. But I’ve been playing it for a week now and for the heck of it, I switched back to my HJS18 yesterday. By comparison, the HJS is louder, but requires more effort to get the notes to blossom. And the 175 seems to have infinitely more sustain. Once you find the groove with the HJS it rewards you with its newfound superior playability. But the 175 is an amazing guitar. It can stand up to any guitar. The recipe that Gibson’s have results in a consistently playable and great sounding guitar.
    one other thing. The 57 classic pickups never get enough kudos. They are the best pickups to my ears. Gibson gets justly criticized for the things they do poorly but they rarely get enough credit for their pickups. To me they are the best.
    Joe D
    No doubt, the 57 classic is a great jazz PUP. They are dark and fat.

    Having owned many 175's from 1963 through 2017, I have to agree that Gibson does have a great recipe for this guitar. The Heritage 575 and the Japanese copies do not get the 175 sound all the way (though they get great jazz guitar sounds in their own right). But there are good ones and lemons from all eras and there are some differences in playabilty, looks and even sound from the various iterations.

    Vinny has written that the new 175 is a cross between the 59 reissue and the 175's of the 90's. Lawson has written that the new 175 is somewhere between the L-5 and the traditional 175.

    Construction wide, there are differences from the 175's of years past to support their positions. On these new 175's, Gibson is using red spruce bracing (as opposed to Sitka spruce) something that to my knowledge they have never done before on a 175 (I Think this will change the tone somewhat). Also they have gone back to a tubeless truss rod (in 1968 Gibson started putting a condom on their trussrods. Some claim this robs the guitar of resonance). The have gone to Grover tuners and a pinned bridge (both of which I believe increases sustain). But these are also heavily constructed guitars weighing nearly 8 pounds (I think the 175's of this era are the heaviest of them all, including the Norlin examples.

    I think the new 175's are a bit brighter with a bit more sustain than the 175's of years past ( I think Vinny's description is spot on). They have a decidedly electric sound. Those who want a more acoustic tone would be wise to go pre 1968 or go with the 59 reissue (Beware though, Vinny has seen a lot of lemons in that model). Those who want a darker, more "thunk" laden tone will want a 175 from 1969 through about 2015.

    As the 175 is not part of the 2018 model list, these may be the last. Or they may produce these into next year (mine is a built in 2017 example of this 2016 model). But, I would bet that this will be the last time that new 175's will be available for under $2500.

    Oh and Bravo on the video JD. That guitar (like all of your guitars) is in the right hands for sure

  26. #75

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    Just chiming in on behalf of the Classic 57 pickup. One reason the Epiphone ES175 Premium can come so close to the Gibson is that pickup, I think. I am sure there are better pickups out there, but the Classic 57 nails something that's vital to folks like me who love the classic jazz guitar humbucker sound. Maybe the MHS will take us a step closer, I'd love to get one and try it out, but alas, it's not possible to buy them yet.

    Again, lovely playing, Joe. You have given me strong encouragement to just sit down and learn performances by great players, something I'd felt I shouldn't really do before. But now I see that can be a tremendously satisfying thing, and a delight to listeners.

  27. #76

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    Needed a story like this to start my day. Amazing story, amazing guitar.

  28. #77

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    As usual Joe, your playing is as smooth as silk. I just love listening to you and watching you play. In the 1960s, the highest compliment a musician could get was to have another musician in the audience remark "very tasty"
    after a performance.

    Joe, very tasty.

    Tony D.

  29. #78

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stringswinger
    No doubt, the 57 classic is a great jazz PUP. They are dark and fat.

    Having owned many 175's from 1963 through 2017, I have to agree that Gibson does have a great recipe for this guitar. The Heritage 575 and the Japanese copies do not get the 175 sound all the way (though they get great jazz guitar sounds in their own right). But there are good ones and lemons from all eras and there are some differences in playabilty, looks and even sound from the various iterations.
    As the 175 is not part of the 2018 model list, these may be the last. Or they may produce these into next year (mine is a built in 2017 example of this 2016 model). But, I would bet that this will be the last time that new 175's will be available for under $2500.
    Oh and Bravo on the video JD. That guitar (like all of your guitars) is in the right hands for sure
    Thanks Marco. I hope you enjoy yours. Take it out and entertain people by the thousands. Get them interested in playing Jazz Guitar. Then, Gibson will never stop makin em!
    Quote Originally Posted by lawson-stone
    Just chiming in on behalf of the Classic 57 pickup. One reason the Epiphone ES175 Premium can come so close to the Gibson is that pickup, I think. I am sure there are better pickups out there, but the Classic 57 nails something that's vital to folks like me who love the classic jazz guitar humbucker sound. Maybe the MHS will take us a step closer, I'd love to get one and try it out, but alas, it's not possible to buy them yet.
    Again, lovely playing, Joe. You have given me strong encouragement to just sit down and learn performances by great players, something I'd felt I shouldn't really do before. But now I see that can be a tremendously satisfying thing, and a delight to listeners.
    Good point Lawson, the pickup is very important to the sound of an electric guitar. The 57 does a great job soaking up the string vibration that the perfectly engineered body of a 175 can generate.
    And thank you sir. It is a privilege to be able to play arrangement of these great songs. They are so important in our musical history. And to top it off, to play them as they were interpreted by our heroes is priceless.
    I wish my father was around so he could hear me playing Joe and Johnny.
    Quote Originally Posted by Paulie2
    Needed a story like this to start my day. Amazing story, amazing guitar.
    Thank you Paulie. I’m glad I could help.
    Quote Originally Posted by pilotony
    As usual Joe, your playing is as smooth as silk. I just love listening to you and watching you play. In the 1960s, the highest compliment a musician could get was to have another musician in the audience remark "very tasty" after a performance.
    Joe, very tasty.
    Tony D.
    Thank you Tony. I probably enjoy reading beautiful comments like yours even more!
    When I was First learning how to play, I didn’t know if I had the patience I needed to be able to play at a high level. But I knew I wanted it. And I wanted it bad. As a teenager, I would think about playing all the time. When I needed to prolong an orgasm, I would go over Jimmy Page playing the “Rain Song”or Steve Howe playing “Mood for a Day” in my mind. Worked like a charm! Guitar playing has been one of the greatest blessings in my life.
    Thank you buddy.

  30. #79

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    I fixed the problem with the high E being too close to the edge of the nut. 20 minute job.
    I don't know about you guys but I've been playing this new 175 for about 2 weeks, And Seriously... This is the bargain of the century. This is an absolutely perfect guitar. It plays as good or better than any other guitar I've ever owned. It sounds incredible. Different than my other 175s. Clearer, if you will.
    I've been playing everything I know on it, from drop D chord melody to Wally's Waltz to Giant Steps to even Chic's Good Times and Le Freak and it just responds. I play Mr Magic to a backing track and I feel like Eric Gale.. Feels so Good and I feel like Grant Geissman.
    Not many guitars are suitable for EVERTHING. This guitar is. I even played Scatterbrain on it yesterday.
    It was meant to be a $4,000 guitar and I don't see any reason why it shouldn't have sold for that.
    These 175's were the deal of the Century.

    We are some lucky hombre's, let me tell you..
    Joe D

  31. #80

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    Joe, Thanks for saying all of that. I've been a 335 player for 35 years and have played 175s, but have never owned one until now. Holy mackerel, what a guitar! I received it on a Thursday and played it at two concerts with the jazz ensemble at the college where I teach on Friday and Saturday. My wife commented that it sounded beautiful - both full and clear. And at home, I can't stop playing it in the evenings. Chord melody standards through either my blackface Deluxe or Quilter 101 make me choke up. I swear sometimes it's not me playing!

    To your comment about the high E string being too close to the edge, though, so it's not my imagination? I'm experiencing the same issue. On certain chords in the middle of the neck I have a tendency to push the string off the neck. I have shorter thicker fingers and I find myself trying to arch my wrist to get a more direct attack on the string. I was going to run it by my luthier buddy and have him check the slot distance to make sure the nut was cut correctly. If need be, I can just have him install a new nut. I was going to ooch the bridge over a bit, but then realized that it has pins to keep in place. So, that's a long prelude to ask, What did you do?

    Thanks much, Joe.

    Skip B.

  32. #81

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    I love my CME 175. Can’t compare it to any others as I had never picked up let alone played one before. Got it based on reputation and forum feeding frenzy. In the three months I’ve had it I’ve been hearing that guitar on the late night radio sound of my youth I never realized were 175’s.

    Thank you forum, thanky kindly.
    Last edited by TedBPhx; 12-18-2017 at 07:25 PM.

  33. #82

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    Well, that sounds just great, Joe, as Classic a jazz guitar sound as you're ever likely to play. Very happy for you.

  34. #83

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipBurz
    Joe, Thanks for saying all of that. I've been a 335 player for 35 years and have played 175s, but have never owned one until now. Holy mackerel, what a guitar!
    I was going to run it by my luthier buddy and have him check the slot distance to make sure the nut was cut correctly. If need be, I can just have him install a new nut. I was going to ooch the bridge over a bit, but then realized that it has pins to keep in place. So, that's a long prelude to ask, What did you do?
    Thanks much, Joe.
    Skip B.
    You are very welcome Skip. As for how to fix it, it’s the old baking soda/crazy glue trick. Remove the string. Mask off the areas above and below up against the nut. Take a sharp sharpie, and make a line next to the string slot, one string width away from the existing slot. Between the E&B string..
    Then take the pinch of Baking Soda and place it on top of the old slot. Press the tip of your finger onto the tiny pile of baking soda. Then blow the rest of it away. Remove your finger and the slot will be neatly filled with the baking soda. Then put a single drop of superglue on the baking soda. It will dry quickly when mixed with the BS. Let it dry for 5 minutes. Where you made your mark with the Sharpie, take a nut file .01 or the back of a utility knife and carve the nut slot. Place the string in the slot. You may have to remove the string and file in the slot more until you get it right. Once you are done, file any excess glue off the top of the nut. Viola ! You will be proud that you did it yourself and girls will continue to think that you are hot!
    Gibson ES-175 Figured-108f53ed-108e-4a1a-9b05-daf3b28e0d77-jpgGibson ES-175 Figured-bb75aaab-7388-4559-991f-a63dd69e1d61-jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by TedBPhx
    I love my CME 175. Can’t compare it to any others as I had never picked up let alone played one before. Got it based on reputation and forum feeding frenzy. In the three months I’ve had it I’ve been hearing that guitar on the late night radio sound of my youth I never realized were 175’s.
    Thank you forum, thanky kindly.
    Ted, it’s no surprise you are pumped about the guitar. It’s an ES 175d. One of the greatest guitars of all time.
    Enjoy!
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Well, that sounds just great, Joe, as Classic a jazz guitar sound as you're ever likely to play. Very happy for you.
    Thank you Rob. Can’t wait until the Elf’s bring you your new baby. When will it be ready?
    Joe D

  35. #84

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    The baking soda trick is a temp fix only. A new nut if you want it to last till new frets are needed.
    If you use real bone dust instead of baking soda the temp fix will last longer till you can get a new nut.
    IMO a fine instrument like a 175 deserves the $50-$100 for a new bone nut nicely luthier slotted and polished.
    At the prices paid for these 175's a few more bucks isn't going to break the bank.
    I must completely disagree with Joe and say fix it right the 1st time and be done with it.

    Sorry bro or should I say McGyver. Just don't strap a toothbrush on the tailpiece.

  36. #85

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    You are very welcome Skip. As for how to fix it, it’s the old baking soda/crazy glue trick. (...)
    Funny thing, mine (also a CME figured 175) needs this exact same fix. I've done it the past on other guitars but on this one I think I'll skip and will take it to my tech .... once I can put it away for a couple of days, which won't be anywhere soon.

    I wonder if we got the same guy doing the initial setup at Gibson/CME?

    By the way, wonderful tone on your video, congrats! I see you're using the JS112 strings? May I ask for the rest of your setup? Thanks!

    Edit: forgot the most important... wonderful playing too!

  37. #86

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    I have never used baking soda, but bone dust with a touch of titanium white then CA is really as durable as the original bone. The fill and re-cut will last as long as the original nut.

    It is as good as new.

    You do not need the titanium white, it just makes the fill match a bit better.

    Chris

  38. #87

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    The baking soda trick is a temp fix only. A new nut if you want it to last till new frets are needed.
    If you use real bone dust instead of baking soda the temp fix will last longer till you can get a new nut.
    IMO a fine instrument like a 175 deserves the $50-$100 for a new bone nut nicely luthier slotted and polished.
    At the prices paid for these 175's a few more bucks isn't going to break the bank.
    I must completely disagree with Joe and say fix it right the 1st time and be done with it.

    Sorry bro or should I say McGyver. Just don't strap a toothbrush on the tailpiece.
    the baking soda trick has lasted at least 30 years on my D’Agostino acoustic. Mr. Kill joy...
    i don’t have any bone dust lying around the house. I was thinking of using some fingernail filings. But I thought I’d have an easier time getting the baking soda trick by you..

  39. #88

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    Quote Originally Posted by JPG
    Funny thing, mine (also a CME figured 175) needs this exact same fix. I've done it the past on other guitars but on this one I think I'll skip and will take it to my tech .... once I can put it away for a couple of days, which won't be anywhere soon.

    I wonder if we got the same guy doing the initial setup at Gibson/CME?

    By the way, wonderful tone on your video, congrats! I see you're using the JS112 strings? May I ask for the rest of your setup? Thanks!

    Edit: forgot the most important... wonderful playing too!
    Thanks JPG.
    My setup is Guitar into a Zoom G3. No amp simulation. Just a flat eq and a slight volume bump. Also a touch of Reverb. USB out into my laptop. Recorded with youcam6.
    Thanks again.
    JD

  40. #89

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405
    Thanks JPG.
    My setup is Guitar into a Zoom G3. No amp simulation. Just a flat eq and a slight volume bump. Also a touch of Reverb. USB out into my laptop. Recorded with youcam6.
    Thanks again.
    JD
    Thank you, it makes it even better! Super tone out of the box :-)

  41. #90

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    Thanks, Joe. I'm going to try it. And in your defense, let me commit two social "faux pas" - an informal fallacy (appeal to authority) and simultaneously name drop. Here goes: In the late-80s/early-90s I was working as a young recording engineer in Memphis, TN and had the opportunity to work on two Stevie Ray Vaughn records. As the junior engineer on the sessions, I spent a good deal of time watching the legendary Cesar Diaz work on SRV's guitars and amps. I watched him do the same nut repair on one of the SRV Strats. Since it was pre-rehab for SRV, I was never certain it was baking soda, but that's another story. Once the glue set, I think he polished it with some very fine sandpaper. I'm going to try it. If it fails, my luthier buddy only charges me $35 for a new bone nut.

    Thanks again.

  42. #91

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    Quote Originally Posted by Max405

    Thank you Rob. Can’t wait until the Elf’s bring you your new baby. When will it be ready?
    Joe D
    Getting close, Joe: late March. Fingers crossed.

  43. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipBurz
    Thanks, Joe. I'm going to try it. And in your defense, let me commit two social "faux pas" - an informal fallacy (appeal to authority) and simultaneously name drop. Here goes: In the late-80s/early-90s I was working as a young recording engineer in Memphis, TN and had the opportunity to work on two Stevie Ray Vaughn records. As the junior engineer on the sessions, I spent a good deal of time watching the legendary Cesar Diaz work on SRV's guitars and amps. I watched him do the same nut repair on one of the SRV Strats. Since it was pre-rehab for SRV, I was never certain it was baking soda, but that's another story. Once the glue set, I think he polished it with some very fine sandpaper. I'm going to try it. If it fails, my luthier buddy only charges me $35 for a new bone nut.

    Thanks again.
    great story!
    And most likely, if it wasn’t baking soda, the happy powder probably was mostly baking soda anyway..
    In Vinny’s defense, I will get a new nut in due time.
    it is a special guitar.
    Joe D

  44. #93

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    Well, I don't know about the rest of you guys, but this made my Christmas 2017.

  45. #94

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    So, about the apparent issue with some of the nuts being cut wrong (but being cut wrong in the same way across several guitar), how does that happen? Did the guy/girl just look at the wrong tick mark on the ruler over the course of a few days? Are they precut?

    With my guitar, there were a few sloppy finish issues. There was some dark colored varnish on the fretboard end cap that I was able to scrap off with my fingernail. All four knob position indicators were misaligned - not point to either zero or ten at either end of the pot. Again, an easy fix. The spacer that holds the front of the pickguard off of the top of the guitar was too long so the screw couldn't bite into the wood. A quick grind with my Dremel and it was all good. One of the edges of my pickguard was so sharp it drew blood when I simply rubbed against it. All easy fixes which didn't really bother me. My theory for these slight imperfections was that the day-of-the-year code on my guitar is 356. That means somebody in Memphis four days before Christmas last year, probably in an eggnog induced haze and trying to get to the Mall of Memphis for last minute shopping, was inspecting my guitar. I've owned Gibsons my entire life, but this is the first brand new one I've ever purchased. Are these the types of things that people are referring to when they complain about about Gibson's quality control? If so, I'm not super bothered by it.

  46. #95

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    Yeah, you and me both GT!

  47. #96

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    If you have a fun dentist he can also fill in the slot with tooth epoxy and blue light it. It will be stronger then the nut.

    I bought 4 of these from CME. 3 of the nuts were cut dead on perfect. Like Marco said they all have tiny flaws......
    Still for the price they can’t be beat.

    Mr.D you knew I wouldn’t be silent about a baking soda repair.........Mr. Kill joy still loves you.

  48. #97

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    Quote Originally Posted by SkipBurz
    .... My theory for these slight imperfections was that the day-of-the-year code on my guitar is 356. That means somebody in Memphis four days before Christmas last year, probably in an eggnog induced haze and trying to get to the Mall of Memphis for last minute shopping, was inspecting my guitar...
    Where might I find this year code?

  49. #98

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    Quote Originally Posted by vinnyv1k
    If you have a fun dentist he can also fill in the slot with tooth epoxy and blue light it. It will be stronger then the nut.

    I bought 4 of these from CME. 3 of the nuts were cut dead on perfect. Like Marco said they all have tiny flaws......
    Still for the price they can’t be beat.

    Mr.D you knew I wouldn’t be silent about a baking soda repair.........Mr. Kill joy still loves you.
    I know that brother. You've been telling me to get a new nut all along..
    Funny thing. I actually went to the drug store to see if they had bone material. They had "bone meal" which was about $17 for the bottle and it looked like it was brown. I said frank that used the free baking Soda that I had in my refrigerator.

    Eventually, I will definitely get a new nut. No doubt. I love this guitar.

    Joe D.

  50. #99

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    Go by your local Luthier’s shop and get a old bone nut out of his garbage can. Take it home and file it down with a metal file (not sandpaper) to get your bone dust.

    Gibson now uses there plek machine to cut there nuts. Obviously someone isn’t doing a proper setup on the plek machine. A plek machine is only as good as the operator that sets in the commands.

    We are seeing a lot of these misaligned cut nuts. QAman got one on a 335 also so it is not just 175’s.
    Also Gibson has been hand rolling the fretboard edge that can lead to excessive fret end bevel.
    Combine the 2 and you have a high E roll off problem. Still a simple fix at the price point we paid.
    At $4k a problem. At $2k no biggie as Marco has stated.

    CME was very upfront from the get go stating minor issues. A nut is a minor issue.

  51. #100

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    Ted, If I'm interpreting your question correctly, modern Gibson serial numbers contain seven digits. The first number is the decade and the fourth digit is the year. The second, third and four digits are the day-of-the year. So, a serial number of 80429234, would be the 42nd day of 1989. (They assume you know the century). The last three digits are the production number. In this case, the 234th guitar of this kind made that year. (I believe that's correct.) So, my new 175 is 13566xxx. That's the 356th day of 2016 (December 21st). I hope that was your question. Skip B.