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  1. #51

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobheff
    Here is me playing the head and one chorus of Softly as in a Morning Sunrise to a iReal backing track. I figured that this would be different enough to a blues to illustrate where I'm at. I will freely admit that this was far from my first take.



    I won't comment on my own playing but I must say that recording myself and listening back to it has been an interesting experience and is something I should do more often.

    Be gentle!
    I agree with the others, this is not bad at all.

    The most straightforward way I've found to integrate a given style - be it an entire genre or a particular musician's style - is to relentlessly copy.

    Pick one of the lessons on this site - e.g. Autumn Leaves - and learn the solo Dirk plays. Then transpose it to all 12 keys. The first few keys will be tedious but the rest will come much faster. You'll then notice these lines 'seeping' into your playing without you even thinking about it.

    HTH.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    Quote Originally Posted by starjasmine
    You can buy this as a poster or find it in any number of books...but if you...write it out yourself, it'll help you to remember it better. In each position, circle the root note...Here's an example of what I mean...


    Now learn to play and to hear this scale in all of those positions...For example...the key of G major. Your dot-chart shows not just G major, but all of its modes. At pos II the dots are F# locrian, at pos III the dots show G Ionian, at pos V the dots show A Dorian, at pos VII you have B Phrygian, at pos VIII you have C Lydian, at pos X you have D Mixolydian, at pos XII you have E Aeolian, and at pos XIV (also at pos II) you have F# Locrian. One way to practice this is to play the chord or loop it, then play the arpeggio, then play modal scale over it...
    Your entire post makes for a great read, especially useful to beginners.

    Shades of Mastercord...
    Here come the 70's... I recall these ads in Guitar Player magazine for the Mastercord Rule, endorsed by Herb Ellis. Like a slide-rule arrangement for chords, the dotted-frets above were written out on a piece of plastic that slid along beneath a clear plastic window. No longer available.

    Made from durable all plastic with instruction booklet and claims to show in seconds what has taken professionals years to master:
    Makes chord books obsolete as it shows all chord positions on the fingerboard in all keys,
    Good for all genres,
    Combines lead melody with chords,
    Sliding to the chord root and quality displays all the related notes of the chord on the whole FB,
    Shows open string, basic, and advanced chords at any neck position,
    Shows chord patterns...


    1976 HERB ELLIS & the Mastercord Rule Guitar Playing Tool - Vintage Ad - EUR 12,34 | PicClick FR

    Believe it or not, it was out of my price range when I first heard of it in the early 70's.

    For many of us here, after playing long enough, all this info is all in the head somewhere. Chord Spelling, Cycle of Thirds & Fifths, common changes, the CAGED fingerboard above, scales, arpeggios, modes, chords, grips, Drop Tone Voicing, extension, alteration, inversions and substitutions...

    But when beginning, this stuff is all a mystery. I can still remember in 1967 trying to play along with Jefferson Airplane's Surrealistic Pillow. 'Come on people...' It was hopeless. I didn't even know what they were doing... Chords? D Major? And you were typically all alone in the endeavor until you came across Guitar Player magazine, before it became a Fan-Mag. The articles were priceless. And learning grips from some famous chord pamphlet with hand-photos of those corn-chord Dominant Sevenths on the top four strings to the strains of Swanee River... And Jazz was hardly spoken of, unless you read Downbeat magazine.

    It's very frustrating being a beginner. And Barre Chords...! The heart break and the nightmare...! Can anyone remember when their index finger was raw? And all that fret buzzing? When an arpeggiated chord sounded like the thud of a wet frog dragging his hind legs along some railway ties. House of the Rising Sun in open position: Am C D F. And the nut was too high on your cheap, imported guitar that never stayed in tune for long.

    Now, it's all taken for granted. But if I can do it, you will too. But it does take a lot of time and life gets in the way. Work it as you can. Jazz Guitar Forum is good because it serves the essential purpose of letting a beginner know what it is that they need to know. Now, with all the books available and the internet, one can research everything. Once you know what you need to look for, it's out there somewhere.

    ...
    Attached Images Attached Images Scales, positions and improvisation-dbwjga5z59av5h-jpg 
    Last edited by StringNavigator; 06-17-2021 at 08:28 AM.

  4. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by bobheff
    Here is me playing the head and one chorus of Softly as in a Morning Sunrise to a iReal backing track. I figured that this would be different enough to a blues to illustrate where I'm at. I will freely admit that this was far from my first take.



    I won't comment on my own playing but I must say that recording myself and listening back to it has been an interesting experience and is something I should do more often.

    Be gentle!
    Bob, I wish I was as good as you. Your technique and feel sounded great to me. The only thing you need to work on is to learn more Jazz phrases. Disclaimer, I am not a very good player.