Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Page 6 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678 LastLast
Posts 251 to 300 of 391
  1. #251

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by elixzer View Post
    HI, I also have recently opned a thread titled 'help me read music?' and I dont see why I cant do this in two threads I need all the help i can git

    I am trying to learn my first song--The Shadow of Your Smile. I love singing, and when I was doing this rendition earlier i thought 'how would I write this down for guitar?' and then i thought, i have to learn how to write music, so must try get me head around it
    elixzer, I learned to read music with the Gibson Learn & Master Guitar course, and it took me a good while, especially getting to notes below the staff. However, just finding pages of sheet music was very helpful. I'd print them out and write in the names of the notes as I went along. It gets better!! I had some fixation against it, for some unknown reason, but now I'm so much happier that I can read. Practicing it with a metronome to get the tempo is a must as well. Once you have those two skills down, you can make at least a passable effort for any song that you run into.
    Oh heck, I forgot about Key Signatures. Those kill me right now. But will be learned!!
    Best of luck.
    Bob

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #252

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by naccoachbob View Post
    elixzer, I learned to read music with the Gibson Learn & Master Guitar course, and it took me a good while, especially getting to notes below the staff. However, just finding pages of sheet music was very helpful. I'd print them out and write in the names of the notes as I went along. It gets better!! I had some fixation against it, for some unknown reason, but now I'm so much happier that I can read. Practicing it with a metronome to get the tempo is a must as well. Once you have those two skills down, you can make at least a passable effort for any song that you run into.
    Oh heck, I forgot about Key Signatures. Those kill me right now. But will be learned!!
    Best of luck.
    Bob
    Hey Bob, thanks for the encouragement. yeah part of me also wants to rebel, but I look at it this way, I was thinking this the other night: i see two extremes, on one hand you have the player who straight out refuses to read music, lets call hir right brain, and on other hand you got the classical musician who can only PLAY when there is a sheet of music in front of them, left brain. So it is like this conflict.

    But when we play --good, even if it is just us feeling that flowing feeling--we are both using creativity and rationality whateverrrr. So it cannot hurt to also get to know how to learn the written language of music. Say I want to write something down for myself--some riff i have got; idea for a song. I need to know how to write it dont I, plus other musicians would see it and know. Whereas usually I will find this chord progression and just put that which is not as detailed, and wouldn't be able to remind me the notes of a melody I was singing over it, also a the rhythm. so that's whats got ME juiced up at the moment

  4. #253

    User Info Menu

    Third day in and i've slowed my metronome down to an embarrassing 40 beats a minute but if that is what i have to do then i will do it. I've just started to do the rest stroke today and i can see that it is going to be a useful technique for knowing where my pick is in relation to my strings.
    Andre

  5. #254

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by andre66 View Post
    Third day in and i've slowed my metronome down to an embarrassing 40 beats a minute but if that is what i have to do then i will do it. I've just started to do the rest stroke today and i can see that it is going to be a useful technique for knowing where my pick is in relation to my strings.
    Andre
    You will be kicking that metronome up before too long man and it has been said before in many places, the speed will come with time. When I start some of the pieces we are working on right now I start at around 40 bpm. I think it is just part of the process and there is nothing to be embarrassed about man.

  6. #255

    User Info Menu

    Nothing embarrassing about 40bpm.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  7. #256

    User Info Menu

    Hopefully the postman will bring the book tomorrow. Today I read through this thread and played many of the examples given. I even composed a little ditty.

  8. #257

    User Info Menu

    Looks good. Hope your postie is forthcoming.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  9. #258

    User Info Menu

    OK.. moving on to the next set. How could it be this hard to find 45 minutes a day to practice? Still, made good progress and I'm really enjoying playing. Probably going to have to pick my pace up a bit.

  10. #259

    User Info Menu

    Yes move on.

    You should review this material often and it will continue to get easier. So, no need for perfection, move on.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  11. #260
    Just got this book and started working on exercise 1.

    I've played guitar on and off for 12 years and I'm decent at it on a technical level but when it comes to rhythm, notes, theory, etc, I'm terrible.

    I know what the notes on the staff are, and have learned how to read music. But I'm doing terribly with exercise 1, I can't get through at 30bpm without making mistakes and having to pause for my brain to cool off. My metronome does not go lower than 30bpm.

    Am I needing to start with a different book for sight reading, or should I press on?

  12. #261

    User Info Menu

    The modern method book is not the best method to begin sight reading if you are an absolute beginner at it. What you need is a book that teaches you to read notes on one string at a time in first position before moving up the neck. The rhythm should begin with whole, half, quarter, eigth, and then sixteenth in that order. Leavitt's modern method is organize in that manner, from easy to difficult. The problem with it for an absolute beginner at sight reading is that it doesn't contain enough drills per topic. Pick Mel bay's modern guitar method grade 1 up from your local music store or Amazon for much more drills. Also, try David Oakes's Music reading for guitar. For me Leavitt's is the best book for any guitarist to study if his goal is to truly master the instrument, but you have to know a little about sight reading before tackling it. You can continue studying Leavitts's modern method. Just be wary of it's limitations for the level you are at.
    Last edited by smokinguit; 06-02-2012 at 03:46 PM.

  13. #262
    Quote Originally Posted by smokinguit View Post
    The modern method book is not the best method to begin sight reading if you are an absolute beginner at it. What you need is a book that teaches you to read notes on one string at a time in first position before moving up the neck. The rhythm should begin with whole, half, quarter, eigth, and then sixteenth in that order. Leavitt's modern method is organize in that manner, from easy to difficult. The problem with it for an absolute beginner at sight reading is that it doesn't contain enough drills per topic. Pick Mel bay's modern guitar method grade 1 up from your local music store or Amazon for much more drills. Also, try David Oakes's Music reading for guitar. For me Leavitt's is the best book for any guitarist to study if his goal is to truly master the instrument, but you have to know a little about sight reading before tackling it. You can continue studying Leavitts's modern method. Just be wary of it's limitations for the level you are at.
    Thank you for this response, I'll check into getting a more basic book to catch up on sight reading.

  14. #263

    User Info Menu

    Hi there, small coyote, and welcome!

    There is *a lot* in that first exercise. You are reading the notes, and needing to find them on the fretboard. Most adults can only cope with learning 2 or 3 new notes at a time (absolute max, 7). Leavitt does have a more basic 'absolute beginners' book where he goes more slowly, but also many others, as suggested above.

    For exercise 1 just now, I would suggest only attempting a few bars at a time. Aim to get a section under your belt before going on to the next bars. Reading, and finding the notes, it does all get easier.

    Good luck!
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  15. #264
    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Hi there, small coyote, and welcome!

    There is *a lot* in that first exercise. You are reading the notes, and needing to find them on the fretboard. Most adults can only cope with learning 2 or 3 new notes at a time (absolute max, 7). Leavitt does have a more basic 'absolute beginners' book where he goes more slowly, but also many others, as suggested above.

    For exercise 1 just now, I would suggest only attempting a few bars at a time. Aim to get a section under your belt before going on to the next bars. Reading, and finding the notes, it does all get easier.

    Good luck!
    Ok I will try and slow it down some and not expect so much from myself on this one.

    I get a weird feeling when I try this exercise, I keep a metronome going and try to hit every other beat while trying to read the notes. It takes me just a little time to know which note I'm looking at, and less time to know where it is on the frets. But it is very slow going at 30bpm, and after a couple of bars my brain just feels fried haha. Pretty awesome.

  16. #265

    User Info Menu

    Ah, give yourself a break and switch the damn metronome off. Just keep at it, and you'll be able to switch it back on again.

    Edit: hey, do you like my sig?
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  17. #266
    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Ah, give yourself a break and switch the damn metronome off. Just keep at it, and you'll be able to switch it back on again.

    Edit: hey, do you like my sig?
    That's dangerous territory for me, I'm forcing myself to use it because in all my time playing guitar I have never used one and you can imagine what that's like. I may turn it off and never turn it back on

    Your sig defines how I play every tune, even the ones I'm good at haha.

  18. #267

    User Info Menu

    Ah, well, OK, here's the deal, ultimately you need to be able to play with a steady beat, metronome on or off.

    "Pulse has a steady beat,
    feel it moving in your feet,
    always steady keep in time,
    tap your feet and say this rhyme,
    pulse has a steady beat..."

    However, if you are thinking hard to make out lines and spaces and read the notes, and find them on the fretboard, then you haven't got an ice cube's chance in hell of getting right notes and right rhythm from the start.

    That's why any absolute beginners book has a section with rhythms played on a single notes. Books likes Oates, or Leavitt Basic Guitar phase 1. So you will need to work on the right rhythm and right notes separately, before putting the two together. If you keep the discipline up you will get there, but you will need to go through phases of imperfection on the way.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  19. #268
    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Ah, well, OK, here's the deal, ultimately you need to be able to play with a steady beat, metronome on or off.

    "Pulse has a steady beat,
    feel it moving in your feet,
    always steady keep in time,
    tap your feet and say this rhyme,
    pulse has a steady beat..."

    However, if you are thinking hard to make out lines and spaces and read the notes, and find them on the fretboard, then you haven't got an ice cube's chance in hell of getting right notes and right rhythm from the start.

    That's why any absolute beginners book has a section with rhythms played on a single notes. Books likes Oates, or Leavitt Basic Guitar phase 1. So you will need to work on the right rhythm and right notes separately, before putting the two together. If you keep the discipline up you will get there, but you will need to go through phases of imperfection on the way.
    I understand what you are saying, trying to process the rhythm, the notes and their locations all at the same time was a lot to take in at once.

    The good news is though last night I was able to run through exercise 1 at 30bpm with only a mistake or two, and am about ready to tackle exercise 2.

    I spent 12 years playing guitar the way that I wanted to play, learning pieces of this and parts of that and paying no mind to things that took actual work like rhythm, timing, and music theory. It did a number on my ability to play guitar and wasted a lot of time.

    So anyway, I'm all about not listening to myself and taking suggestions from others. I picked up Music Reading for Guitar by Oakes, and am going to start on that tonight. I can't wait!

    My only problem is after spending 30-45 mins on this each night, I'm really confounded as to what to do with the rest of my guitar playin time lol. I feel dirty playing the same old garbage out of rhythm and not progressing my skills.

  20. #269

    User Info Menu

    Well, look, play the same old stuff IN RHYTHM and with attention to TONE. 90% of music is the same thing over and over anyway; there are only 12 notes, 5 lines, 4 spaces, 6 strings, all small and easy numbers to deal with. Do this for yourself: think hard about what you really want to sound like and what you really want to play, then take the necessary steps to get there. But when you're fooling around with the guitar, fool around seriously. Even the highest-level pros like to fool around with the guitar, but they still want to sound good. And keep this in mind: guitar playing is accumulative. Everything you do right affects everything else in a positive way. Every good scale helps your arpeggios, every good chord helps your ear-training, etc.

  21. #270

    User Info Menu

    You don't need to spend that much time on it. You will burn out since this is all new material. Spend no more than 15 minutes on one small topic discussed in the book. Here's a tip to learning the notes: pick one string, say high E, and learn natural notes from open E to G at the 3rd fret. Find an empty staff paper and write thoses notes on the staff in a random fashion and then play it on the guitar. Do this several times for a few days without the metronome. Also when you are outside of the practice room, try to visualize where the notes are on the guitar and how they look on the staff. Your recognition of where to put your finger as you see the notes on paper will improve.

  22. #271
    Thanks for all the tips! I'll try to incorporate that into my practice.

    As far as goal, I'd really like to play jazz guitar, hence why I'm on this forum. I don't know much outside of pentatonic blues in one position, and a bunch of pieces of random music, and some solos from various songs.

    I like Pat Metheny's style and sound, and would like to be able to create music similar. But really any jazz will do, and I feel like based on what you guys have said about this book it'll really get me on the right path for that.

  23. #272

    User Info Menu

    Hi coyote, You're making progress!

    Like others here, I found I can only spend so much time on Leavitt. Then I need to find something else because the next leavitt page is just too challenging. The rhythm section of Oats will be helpful but possibly not the notes because he starts in 5th position and Leavitt doesn't get there for a l-o-n-g time. If you have little theory you might want to check out the major scale, how it is constructed, because that is important for jazz. And other things.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  24. #273
    Yeah I just noticed that he does start in 5th position, haha I was actually thinking about that in the shower this morning >.>

    I shouldn't have a problem just playing in first position in Oakes instead of 5th, or just switching it up. Exercise 1 in Leavitt takes me up to C on the B string, and if I do first position on Oakes it picks up at open E then F and G on 3rd fret.

    Gah I guess it doesn't matter lol and I should be happy with myself that I can actually locate the notes now.

    Currently I don't mind too much spending all my practice time on these two books, I think when I start getting burnt I'll just try learning some new songs after spending some minutes on this stuff. Rigid learning by getting the sheet music, and starting at the first bar, slow tempo, right rhythm, etc. Instead of what I used to do which is get tabs and pick my favorite pieces and just learning that with no rhythm.

    edit: I do have some music theory, I should be spending some time connecting it with the guitar though. I just never feel like getting around to building the major and minor scales on the guitar lol.
    Last edited by a_small_coyote; 06-04-2012 at 04:06 PM.

  25. #274

    User Info Menu

    Hi coyote, You can do all of Oakes chapters 1 and 2, and a good deal beyond that, in open position. You just need to ignore all the fingering. Oakes goes into more complex rhythms at this point, and the down up picking for 8ths. This is all compatible with Leavitt, he just presents it in a different order.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  26. #275
    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Hi coyote, You can do all of Oakes chapters 1 and 2, and a good deal beyond that, in open position. You just need to ignore all the fingering. Oakes goes into more complex rhythms at this point, and the down up picking for 8ths. This is all compatible with Leavitt, he just presents it in a different order.
    I'll be trying the various positions and changing it up some as I learn more of the fretboard. So far I got almost all of first position down pretty well.

  27. #276

    User Info Menu

    That's great. So once you've got something, you move on to the next page, but keep coming back and reviewing what you've done. 80 bpm is a good speed to aim for but you'd need to build up to it without sacrificing accuracy.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  28. #277
    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    That's great. So once you've got something, you move on to the next page, but keep coming back and reviewing what you've done. 80 bpm is a good speed to aim for but you'd need to build up to it without sacrificing accuracy.
    Thanks for the tips, hopefully I might catch up to you guys by the time you move onto vol 2!

  29. #278
    Hello to all, just found this forum and you have inspired me to pick up the guitar again after a couple of years off. Until then I had been playing for almost ten years but never really nailed it. I got tuned in to jazz music through learning to swing dance and my dream is to play with some of the bands that do the rounds in our lindy hop scene here in London. Anyone else just starting out on page one or have I missed the boat?

  30. #279

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by gregfriedrice View Post
    Hello to all, just found this forum and you have inspired me to pick up the guitar again after a couple of years off. Until then I had been playing for almost ten years but never really nailed it. I got tuned in to jazz music through learning to swing dance and my dream is to play with some of the bands that do the rounds in our lindy hop scene here in London. Anyone else just starting out on page one or have I missed the boat?
    Hey Greg,

    Welcome aboard.

    This is a popular book, I hope some others will start from page one. I know that 'a small coyote' recently started posting.

    Regardless, some of us 'originals' try to check back on the earlier threads and share our experience.

    I hope you will post some recordings as you go, it's a great way to increase your focus and hold yourself accountable.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  31. #280
    Quote Originally Posted by gregfriedrice View Post
    Hello to all, just found this forum and you have inspired me to pick up the guitar again after a couple of years off. Until then I had been playing for almost ten years but never really nailed it. I got tuned in to jazz music through learning to swing dance and my dream is to play with some of the bands that do the rounds in our lindy hop scene here in London. Anyone else just starting out on page one or have I missed the boat?
    I've just started, I'm just about to get into the Sea to Sea duet

  32. #281
    Brilliant, I've just finished having a quick look at that so I'll have a go at recording it this weekend and maybe we can compare notes. Best of luck!

  33. #282

    User Info Menu

    Hi there,

    Started exercise 1 -4 last night. I find that I was able to play all 4 exercises without a metronome in quarter notes quite easily. But when I try to play a metronome at 60bpm it was a complete disaster!!! It took me 3 hours to play exercise 1 without any error at 80bpm (i find 80 easier than 60)...

    Also, I taped myself playing and find that sometimes I hit a note harder than others.... Never thought such a simple exercise would take me soooo long. And now my feet hurts from constant tapping...

    Do any of you find that as you practice more and more, you aren't really reading the notes off of the page but actually relying on muscle memory?

    Great thread, Thanks!

  34. #283

    User Info Menu

    Hi jokkon, are you able to record? Could you record an exercise both with and without the metronome? It might help to see exactly where the problem is. Fairly much everyone find the noise of the met offputting, but you do get used to it after a while.

    Do I find I have memorized a page and therefore I'm not really reading? Yes. The book is good for reading but I think we have all found we need other material to read too. If you read through this thread you'll find lots of suggestions for other reading material, including some of our own compositions.

    Practical advice - find different ways of tapping your foot. Hopefully you have 2, so you you can swap about. Also, you can tap with toe, or keep toe to floor and tap with heel. It helps to swap about otherwise you can get very tense in concentration and muscle. Also, take breaks!
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  35. #284
    Quote Originally Posted by gregfriedrice View Post
    Brilliant, I've just finished having a quick look at that so I'll have a go at recording it this weekend and maybe we can compare notes. Best of luck!
    I've yet to attempt it, and I still need to go back and review exercises 1-4. It's very slow going for me as I'm also working out of Oakes "Sight Reading for Guitar".

    I get to spend about 30-45 mins a night on practice, and I like to spend some time playing with The Real Book so that I don't get burnt out. It's going to take me a very long time to get through Leavitt.

  36. #285

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ten left thumbs View Post
    Hi jokkon, are you able to record? Could you record an exercise both with and without the metronome? It might help to see exactly where the problem is. Fairly much everyone find the noise of the met offputting, but you do get used to it after a while.

    Do I find I have memorized a page and therefore I'm not really reading? Yes. The book is good for reading but I think we have all found we need other material to read too. If you read through this thread you'll find lots of suggestions for other reading material, including some of our own compositions.

    Practical advice - find different ways of tapping your foot. Hopefully you have 2, so you you can swap about. Also, you can tap with toe, or keep toe to floor and tap with heel. It helps to swap about otherwise you can get very tense in concentration and muscle. Also, take breaks!
    Thank you, I just tried playing again and find that I don't mind the metronome as much as it did yesterday. I am still making mistakes here and there but the clicking sound sort of fades into the background when I am concentrating on playing. When I make a mistake, I just wait for the next beat and start again. I find that it is not a good idea to stop completely whenever you make a mistake; pause, get your bearings and try again.

    Also, Great advice regarding alternating foot tapping ways... can't believe I hadn't thought of that...

    One thing I would like to share with others is that recording your own playing really DOES HELP!! Not only is it a motivational boost (strive for a perfect recording of the exercise), it also identifies areas where you need to focus on (for me, I play all the notes in varying degree of volume...)

  37. #286

    User Info Menu

    I have another question. Regarding sight reading... Is the ultimate goal being able to see a note on a page and then "play" it in your head? Right now, reading is just "translating" a note on a page into a letter and positioning my finger on the corresponding fret. It seems incredible to me that a musician can read a piece of music and then play it right away.... Just sounds too good to be true.

  38. #287

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by jokkon View Post
    I have another question. Regarding sight reading... Is the ultimate goal being able to see a note on a page and then "play" it in your head? Right now, reading is just "translating" a note on a page into a letter and positioning my finger on the corresponding fret. It seems incredible to me that a musician can read a piece of music and then play it right away.... Just sounds too good to be true.
    Yes that does sound to good to be true and would take an exceptional memory. I wouldn't be surprised if some could do it though.

    For me, when I sight read, I look ahead, from a beat or two to a whole measure, and can anticipate what the music is going to sound like. And sometimes after a few measures I can understand the feeling/mood of the piece. When things go well and the music isn't too difficult, while sight reading I can make it sound musical.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  39. #288

    User Info Menu

    Couple comments: Burn out is a real issue. You need to find a pace and an attitude you can keep going with. This book assumes a lot of progress.

    Second, re recording. Don't feel like it has to be perfect before sharing. You'll find a lot of my own recordings here really aren't all that good. I don't see it as a performance - just a measure of where I was on that day.

    Now, to address this:

    Quote Originally Posted by jokkon View Post
    I have another question. Regarding sight reading... Is the ultimate goal being able to see a note on a page and then "play" it in your head? Right now, reading is just "translating" a note on a page into a letter and positioning my finger on the corresponding fret. It seems incredible to me that a musician can read a piece of music and then play it right away.... Just sounds too good to be true.
    You're doing find, just keep doing it. You will find, with more experience, with understanding what key you're in, you will get better at anticipating what comes next. What you can do to help this skill specifically:

    Take a section and try scat-singing it before you play. Don't worry about getting the pitches 'right' - just get the rhythm and the general shape - up or down?

    Once you know a section, sing, hum, or whistle as you play.

    This is all good for improv because you connect with the note you hear in your head, and you connect the note in your head to the note your fingers play.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  40. #289

    User Info Menu

    I've already spoken to some here via mail - but I should publicize the nature of this snag I find myself in; maybe some of you will see a perfect solution.

    I want *very* much to "record my way through" the Berklee books (thanks for that phrase, fep) -- but after doing three of the assignments, I've found that, because I don't sight-read well enough to sight-read the duets, I end up spending all my quite-limited energy on the Berklee material, leaving none for just playing, for ear-training, etc. If I did nothing else, I could probably record a duet well enough to post in two days. Sounds preposterous, huh?

    So, why not spread the work out over the whole 7 days? Good question. Maybe because I fear not getting it done, even with seven days, so I turn workaholic and do nothing till it's out of the way.

    Maybe I should take some time and just work hard on sight-reading. However, it *is* true that once we begin working out of the fingering patterns (no open strings), my sight-reading is far better. Perhaps I'll jump to Part II and join you guys, to see whether it goes any faster.

    FEP: can you make an estimate about how long it took you to reach a reasonably adept (whatever that is) level in sight-reading? When you began reading the Real Books last year, could you already sight-read?

    These method books are, imo, without peer. We mustn't let this group languish. But I do believe that, as it's going now - one week per unit - those who can't sight-read the duets (and the other stuff, too) are going to meet with too much frustration in trying to "perform" the pieces and post them proudly.

    Bright ideas, anyone? Plain ideas? Possible ideas? Just ideas?

    kj

  41. #290

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27 View Post
    Just ideas?

    kj
    KBO works for me (keep buggering on).
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  42. #291

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27 View Post

    FEP: can you make an estimate about how long it took you to reach a reasonably adept (whatever that is) level in sight-reading? When you began reading the Real Books last year, could you already sight-read?
    I don't really know. The first lessons I had (I was about 10 years old), those lasted for maybe a couple months, I was taking lessons from a neighbor who was about 13 years old, he played well but he didn't have any teaching experience. It was Carl Verheyen! Google him and check him out.

    Here's a tune, I've seen him play this, a trio with him singing and playing this at the same time: Carl Verheyen at Music Max on Tue Jun 12

    Then at about 13 years old I took lessons from an 'official' guitar teacher, who was a classical guitarist. He taught me to read and that's when my reading started. I took lessons for maybe a year. So from the start I was reading music notation. Tablature was something I already didn't like, my initial experience made it easier for me to read notation.

    I played guitar through my college years and then for the most part didn't play from about 25 to 42 years old. I'm 53 now.

    So, I've spent a lot of time reading music, but most of that time I was not making an effort to be a "sight reader". I suppose I could sight read real simple music when I was 14 years old.

    It was 2011 when I made a conscious effort to practice sight reading. Since then I include 10 to 15 minutes a day sight reading. That's really all it takes for me to show some improvement over time.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  43. #292
    Here we are - my version of Sea to Sea. A few duff notes but I wasn't striving for perfection! After the 10th take definitely started to feel I was playing from memory rather than reading the notes but I guess that's unavoidable. Recorded with the built-in mic on my laptop hence the noise. I've got a USB interface coming in the post so subsequent recordings should sound a lot cleaner I hope. How is everyone else getting on?

    https://www.box.com/s/d76ef5d2cc9ff225d201

  44. #293

    User Info Menu

    That's great Greg, well done! You're getting those chords nice and clean with the pick starting and stopping in the right spots. Definitely time to move on.

    Don't worry about the occasional hiccup - you just keep going without missing a beat and no one cares.
    I am responsible for all my mistakes.

  45. #294
    Thanks for the encouragement TLT, I'll press on. I'm so happy to be playing guitar again after such a long break.

  46. #295

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    I don't really know. The first lessons I had (I was about 10 years old), those lasted for maybe a couple months, I was taking lessons from a neighbor who was about 13 years old, he played well but he didn't have any teaching experience. It was Carl Verheyen! Google him and check him out.

    Here's a tune, I've seen him play this, a trio with him singing and playing this at the same time: Carl Verheyen at Music Max on Tue Jun 12

    Then at about 13 years old I took lessons from an 'official' guitar teacher, who was a classical guitarist. He taught me to read and that's when my reading started. I took lessons for maybe a year. So from the start I was reading music notation. Tablature was something I already didn't like, my initial experience made it easier for me to read notation.

    I played guitar through my college years and then for the most part didn't play from about 25 to 42 years old. I'm 53 now.

    So, I've spent a lot of time reading music, but most of that time I was not making an effort to be a "sight reader". I suppose I could sight read real simple music when I was 14 years old.

    It was 2011 when I made a conscious effort to practice sight reading. Since then I include 10 to 15 minutes a day sight reading. That's really all it takes for me to show some improvement over time.
    Thanks very much, Frank. I *thought* I posted a similar response (similar to this) right after your post, but apparently it didn't take.

    So if I work hard, six months of sight-reading (given that I read okay now) might get me up to speed, I think. I'll go back to the beginning with the most rudimentary stuff I can find.

    Interesting, Frank, that you "put it down" for a good stretch of years, too. I didn't know that.

    Also, I like your idea of reading through the Real Books. It's a rich multi-task, isn't it? Becoming acquainted with new tunes, searching out versions on YouTube, the reading, the metronome practice....

    BTW, your childhood teacher is very talented. LOVE that kind of earthy, groove music, hits you in the stomach and makes you grunt.

    Thanks again.

    kj

  47. #296

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by gregfriedrice View Post
    Here we are - my version of Sea to Sea. A few duff notes but I wasn't striving for perfection! After the 10th take definitely started to feel I was playing from memory rather than reading the notes but I guess that's unavoidable. Recorded with the built-in mic on my laptop hence the noise. I've got a USB interface coming in the post so subsequent recordings should sound a lot cleaner I hope. How is everyone else getting on?

    https://www.box.com/s/d76ef5d2cc9ff225d201
    Hey Greg, good going. Very enjoyable, nice chord attack (smooth) - just a good performance all 'round.

    Echoing what TLT said about boo-boos: the great roots musician and musicologist, David Bromberg (a virtuoso guitarist), said, "I've found that an audience will forgive mistakes completely as long as 1) you stay strongly in the groove, and 2) nail the ending. F. up the ending real bad, and you've f.ed up."


    Great job, Greg. Give us another one!

    kojo

  48. #297

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27 View Post
    BTW, your childhood teacher is very talented. LOVE that kind of earthy, groove music, hits you in the stomach and makes you grunt.

    Thanks again.

    kj
    For me he has a very recognizable style. On the other hand, he plays a lot of different styles being a first call Hollywood studio musician. But I usually can still recognize his playing.

    He's also the guitarist for Supertramp. And he has his own band.

    Once in a while he does a cover. My favorite is his cover of "My Back Pages" by Dylan. I couldn't find that. Here's a Mingus cover, check it out:

    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  49. #298

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by fep View Post
    For me he has a very recognizable style. On the other hand, he plays a lot of different styles being a first call Hollywood studio musician. But I usually can still recognize his playing.

    He's also the guitarist for Supertramp. And he has his own band.

    Once in a while he does a cover. My favorite is his cover of "My Back Pages" by Dylan. I couldn't find that. Here's a Mingus cover, check it out:

    Holy Moly! That's my favorite Mingus tune, too -- but this guy is wa-a-a-a-a-y beyond good. I wonder did he study formally...

    I'd trade hands with him any day. Super music, Frank.

  50. #299

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Kojo27 View Post
    Holy Moly! That's my favorite Mingus tune, too -- but this guy is wa-a-a-a-a-y beyond good. I wonder did he study formally...

    I'd trade hands with him any day. Super music, Frank.
    Carl is my older brothers friend. We all went to the same small catholic grade school and high school. Carl was in my brothers class. I was just the younger brother so I didn't hang out with them. Carl does still calls me 'brother Frank' to this day when I go to one of his shows and say hi. And it was real cool that he sent me well wishes when I was in the hospital and in recovery.

    I recall Carl going to college back east somewhere. I don't even know if that was to study music and I don't know if he finished. But I do know that he taught at GIT.

    He was a bit of a legend back in his high school days. A hot shot guitarist in high school was a big deal back then.

    Edit: Jeez, I just realized I'm breaking my own rules, I'm hijacking our thread. Oops
    Last edited by fep; 06-13-2012 at 03:59 PM.
    B+
    Frank (aka fep)

  51. #300

    User Info Menu

    What's the name of the Mingus tune?