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  1. #101

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    Hello Jetman would be interest if you put some videos. I think there are few videos on the internet about these books. Hello Rob I've seen some of your videos on youtube, you are the only one who has videos about the books and inspired me to make some videos. Keep posting Rob.
    My goal was to record the exercises as they are and maybe later make a mix of everything. Maybe I will get some suggestions and come up with new ideas. I have already seen an interesting ideiain this topic which is to do all exercises in the same key. My main goal is to apply the exercises to songs like Kurt Rosenwinkel, Jonathan Kreisberg, Joe Pass and others. My channel will be my motivation and what will force me not to give up. It would be easier if there were more videos from this book and from others.It won't be easy but I will try to record.
    It won't be easy but I will try to recordIt won't be easy but I will try to record

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #102

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    I'm not sure this early book of GVE will give you much to play with in the music of Rosenwinkel, etc. The exercises are more for swing-style chord soloing, Alan Reuss style, maybe. GVE's three Harmonic Mechanisms books will furnish you a lot more ideas for advanced playing - see the work of Steve Herberman for a modern take on GVE. But I'd be absolutely delighted if you prove me wrong :-)

  4. #103

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    Re-reading a few of the posts above, we seem to be talking about different books: the slim Guitar Method versus the three-volume Harmonic Mechanisms. I was talking latterly about the former book. Sorry if I set us at cross purposes. I now think you mean to record the exercises from the three-volume Harmonic mechanisms. If that's the case, I wish you all the best! That's a tall mountain which few manage to climb to the summit. But it's doable, so get stuck in!

  5. #104

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    Yes, I'm talking about the three volumes of harmonic mechanisms. It won't be easy and I don't have lot of time to practice but I will see how far I can go. There is so little information about them and I think they should have a lot of important information. It take a lot of time but I believe It will be worth It.

  6. #105

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    Where will you start? GVE said they are not to be started at Page 1, but just jump in to things you find interesting.

  7. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Where will you start? GVE said they are not to be started at Page 1, but just jump in to things you find interesting.
    Somebody in another thread made this recommendation :
    Read the explanatory info - pages 1 - 28. Then work through pages 29 - 63 before going on to the other volumes.
    That is my plan if I ever get started.

  8. #107

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    I am thinking of doing the exercises in the same key. I had the opportunity a few years ago to do the first exercises in a row and could not absorb anything. If I do one key will help me gain some facility in the key and will repeat the exercises in the other keys later which I think is much better. The great purpose of the book is not to memorize the exercises but to memorize the triads and to be able to apply them in various ways, horizontal, vertical, diagonal, all inversions, open triads, closed triads. Make music with the information. The hard part is being able to apply them in various keys with facility. If all the songs were in C major was not difficult, the problem is that we have few bars a ii-V-I in C major or other keys, and it changes to a melodic or harmonic scale or maybe just a chord and is difficult to master everything. Summing up after understanding the exercises in the same key and know which notes are part of the others keys is all easier. After doing some exercises in C major just change a note and we have F major, another note and Bb major and so on. With time we begin to dominate the other keys. I'm still thinking if I include the natural minor, harmonic minor and melodic minor scales with the major scale. I have to try it to see what is better for me. The most important thing is to make music with the little we know, we only really learn when we start trying to improvise with what we learn instead of waiting to know a lot, because we will forget some things if we do not use the information.

  9. #108

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    Work in progress, I will record all the triads in the first inversion in all major keys.

  10. #109

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    Read up on the way GVE discusses moving fingerings from one chord to the next. It improves efficiency (speaking as someone who's gotten through about two pages of exercises). There are some videos of GVE in action to see how he applied this in practice.

    (this one keeps cutting away annoyingly but has some good shots of his hands).

    and other videos: george van eps - YouTube

  11. #110

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tgv10

    Work in progress, I will record all the triads in the first inversion in all major keys.
    Hey,
    Why are you playing with a pick? I believe it's supposed to be played with fingers.

  12. #111

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    I have to read again the first few pages of the book to see what GVE says about finger movement, I read the first few pages a few years ago. I'd rather play with the pick, I think it's optional, watch Kurt Rosenwinkel improvising on the tune Reflection.


  13. #112

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    Note that Van Eps is tuned down a full step, which was a wise move given the ungainly monstrosity that was the Gretsch 7-string.

  14. #113

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    Hey guys, how's it going in practice room? I decided to use quarantine to focus more on HM and I'm really enjoying it. I set the goal to finish all root scales by the end of this month. I normally play one or two scales per day. The tricky fingerings also help me develop my left hand strength.
    Btw, I also have a theory question- if CEG, EGC, GCE are inversions of C major triad, what are these then - ECG, GEC, CGE? Are there names for these kind of triads?

    ????????? ??? ???? SM-J730FM, ?????????????? Tapatalk

  15. #114

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    Quote Originally Posted by jetaman
    Btw, I also have a theory question- what are these then - ECG, GEC, CGE? Are there names for these kind of triads?
    Spread Triads
    cheers!

  16. #115

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    Triads within the same octave are "closed voicings," such as CEG, EGC, GCE (root, 1st and 2nd inversions). ECG, GEC, CGE are going to straddle octaves and are called "spread voicings" as jazzish said, or also called "open voicings."

  17. #116

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    I have all three of those books and have had them for years. Gave them a try and they did absolutely nothing for me. Bunch of exercises that just did not go anywhere for my type of learning. Maybe I am missing something but Van Epps certainly was a player. Not really one of my favorite chord players either and he seemed to be the guy who took it far. Not putting down his playing at all it just is a different bag.

  18. #117

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    I worked with the slim volume (not the triology) many years ago. I couldn't get anything useful out of it.

    My experience is that I retain things that I learn in the context of a song much better than I learn anything in the abstract. I don't recall anything like a song in that book.

  19. #118

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    It really depends on how you practice and apply the material in the books. Earlier in this thread we had the honour of reading posts by Steve Herberman who worked with all books and said that he gained so much from it. Also I posted comments by Jordi Farres who also worked with three volumes and by his YouTube videos we can see how it influenced his playing. And finally, I posted earlier video of Ted Greene who said that in order to master baroque improvisation you should go through George's books.

    Well, in my opinion, there are different types of guitar players. There are good players, and there are great players. But there are also exceptional players. I think that in order to become a good player you don't need HM. Most people are fine without it. But if you will find the time and effort to dig it, it will open so much for you. And you can become an exceptional player. George was one, as was Ted.

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  20. #119

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    Hey guys, how's it going? I have a question about some of the exercises. On page 35 there is exerice on various plucking orders for triads. it says "apply to open voicings also 1st inversion - 1st station". Well, I finaly got to scales in open 2nd inversion triads. So why does the author suggest not to use the plucking orders for open 2nd inversion or open root inversions, but only for 1st? and what does it mean 1st station? Thank you.

  21. #120

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    Quote Originally Posted by jetaman
    Hey guys, how's it going? I have a question about some of the exercises. On page 35 there is exerice on various plucking orders for triads. it says "apply to open voicings also 1st inversion - 1st station". Well, I finaly got to scales in open 2nd inversion triads. So why does the author suggest not to use the plucking orders for open 2nd inversion or open root inversions, but only for 1st? and what does it mean 1st station? Thank you.
    "1st inversion - 1st station" is just a heading for the example notation shown.

    From Volume 2 page 3: "Station" is used to describe a step of the scale that contains voice motion, for instance:..."

    Hope this helps!
    /Hans