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  1. #1

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    Looking for a good slim neck nylon/electric guitar for for Jazz and standards. Would be interested in any suggestions on newer models or older ones I might be able to pick up. Would appreciate any info.

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Godin multiac nylon. I don't find it anything to rave about but quite ok.

  4. #3

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    I just bought a Taylor NS last week. I've wanted a nylon for years since I love working on Bossas.
    It feels good and plays nicely. The volume is lower than I would have expected. The electronics are supposed to be excellent and it is supposed to sound wonderful amplified although I haven't fooled around with that enough yet to comment. Not sure if the Taylor is the best bang for the buck but I am definitely enjoying it a lot and don't regret the purchase.

    I was also tempted by the Godin, but I think it has zero acoustic sound and one of the things I was really looking for was a small guitar I could play wherever I wanted without an amplifier.

  5. #4

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    Had a Godin and I liked it alot, but like you said no unpluged acoustic sound. Also never had the money or desire to use all the synth stuff. I played the new AEG Ibanez and was pretty suprised. A nice higher end Taylor or a McGill is always on the wish list. E-bay just posted a Gibson Chet Atkins nylon. That would be fun too but I think it has a wider neck.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzchief1
    Had a Godin and I liked it alot, but like you said no unpluged acoustic sound. Also never had the money or desire to use all the synth stuff. I played the new AEG Ibanez and was pretty suprised. A nice higher end Taylor or a McGill is always on the wish list. E-bay just posted a Gibson Chet Atkins nylon. That would be fun too but I think it has a wider neck.
    Gibson Chet Atkins nylon has nut width 52mm.
    Not easy to play complicated jazz chords.
    May be you have to look for more semi-acoustic classical guitar.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzchief1
    A nice higher end Taylor or a McGill is always on the wish list. E-bay just posted a Gibson Chet Atkins nylon. That would be fun too but I think it has a wider neck.
    You may be able to score a very nice deal on a Taylor if you're willing to get one 3-4 years old and can find one that the store has been having difficulty moving. I got a very nice surprise 800$ rebate on the sticker price when they saw me looking at the one I have now. It's a 4 year old model. Nylon string models aren't very much in demand so I imagine this type of thing is very doable if you're lucky enough to have a few in your vicinity. I think I got the only one in a store within 200 miles of where I live.

  8. #7

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    I play nylon. But I need a cutaway. Do all these ones that you guys are talking about have cutaways?

  9. #8

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    Taylors, Ibanez and Godins all have cutaways.

  10. #9

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    Bartolex nylons have cutaways, and they come in 7-string models.

  11. #10

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    Cordoba Orchestra Fusion! I played one in a store and liked it immediately. It has a very slightly radiused fretboard and is very easy to play.



    Cheers,
    Evan

  12. #11

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    Buscarino Cabaret, of course

  13. #12

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    index

    Looks interesting.

  14. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by kris
    index

    Looks interesting.
    I love the look. Fabulous looking guitars.

    But, personally, I like a big fat neck. Bigger and fatter the better. Probably could get that custom.

    And I wonder about the sound. It's tough to tell on the video, but it doesn't sound like it has as much low-end as an ordinary nylon string guitar. So that would be an immediate deal breaker. For me, nylon is about rich acoustic tone. Nylon string guitars have nice beautiful low ends. Wouldn't want to give that up. The challenge is to somehow put just a bit of edge on the high end.

    But I like the direction the guy is going in with those guitars. And he's not afraid to play nylon with a pick.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by jster
    I love the look. Fabulous looking guitars.

    But, personally, I like a big fat neck. Bigger and fatter the better. Probably could get that custom.

    And I wonder about the sound. It's tough to tell on the video, but it doesn't sound like it has as much low-end as an ordinary nylon string guitar. So that would be an immediate deal breaker. For me, nylon is about rich acoustic tone. Nylon string guitars have nice beautiful low ends. Wouldn't want to give that up. The challenge is to somehow put just a bit of edge on the high end.

    But I like the direction the guy is going in with those guitars. And he's not afraid to play nylon with a pick.
    Hi,
    I've used about 10 years arch-top nylon strings guitar/Henneken Concerto/.The sound was very good-special with AER amp.
    I used it for fingerstyle playing.My model was with Fishman electronic.
    Good piezzo pickup is very imortant for that kind of guitars.

  16. #15

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    Hey Kris,

    I wasn't even thinking about amplification. He's not amplifying it in the video is he?

    Oh, I see, more than one video. OK.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by jster
    Hey Kris,

    I wasn't even thinking about amplification. He's not amplifying it in the video is he?

    Oh, I see, more than one video. OK.
    You are right.
    Arch-top guitar with nylon strings is different than standard classical guitar.
    It is not so loud like classical and it has different sound/because of completly different construction/.
    I do not think so anybody can play solo concert on it without amplification.

  18. #17

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    Do the classical guys use piezzo pick ups? Or just microphones?

  19. #18

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    I think classical guys use microphones.They use very expensive instruments .

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by fumblefingers
    Buscarino Cabaret, of course
    1.5 year wait time, of course.

    There's also Rich di Carlo and Kirk Sands who make wonderful customs. I think you can do this if you are replacing a guitar of the same type that you already own, but not for the first dip in the pool for a new type of guitar. The wait would be pure torture.
    Last edited by peterk1; 02-24-2013 at 05:36 PM.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by peterk1
    1.5 year wait time, of course.

    There's also Rich di Carlo and Kirk Sands who make wonderful customs. I think you can do this if you are replacing a guitar of the same type that you already own, but not for the first dip in the pool for a new type of guitar. The wait would be pure torture.
    Great instrumants are expensive!Slim-Neck Nylon Guitar for Jazz-wolinski1-jpg
    Last edited by kris; 02-24-2013 at 05:49 PM.

  22. #21

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    I think this model of Carvin Cl 450 is a very nice nylon strings guitar.

  23. #22

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    There has been much talk of bank breaking, divorce making instruments but the poor man's answer is, get a decent 3/4 size classical. My Fender ESC80 cost £60 and is a charming little guitar with a 44mm nut, good intonation and, now that I have given it a brass saddle, quite a jazzy sound.

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by kris
    Gibson Chet Atkins nylon has nut width 52mm.
    Not easy to play complicated jazz chords.
    May be you have to look for more semi-acoustic classical guitar.
    There are two nut widths on the Chet's, at least the Gibsons, not sure on the Epis. I don't have it at hand, but I think the narrower one (CE) is closer to 45mm than the wider one (CEC).
    Brad

  25. #24

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    Slim-Neck Nylon Guitar for Jazz-2002-kris-wolinski-jpg
    Sound was Ok...but neck was typical calasical nut 52 mm.
    sold...;-)

  26. #25

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    Classical guys usually use mics, but several are using pickup systems nowadays. I just instyalled a Kremona on one of my good instruments, and it works really well, for only about $70.

  27. #26

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    You could find a classical you like and have the neck narrowed, by the way. My favorite 7-string was a flamenco 6-string that I converted; I imagine the reverse is probably easier.

  28. #27

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    There's the out-of-production Yamaha AEX-500. There's a couple of very slightly different models, and mine was an AEX-500N which indicates a natural finish (N). Regular guitar neck width rather than classical so it was fairly easy to switch between instruments. Single-cutaway body, too, with EQ controls arrayed along the upper bout. I was playing mine a lot a few years ago and really liked it, always getting compliments on the tone. Think more chambered solid-body construction (so there's little actual acoustic output), and it had a very nice 'acoustic' tone plugged in, although I doubt that anyone would mistake it for a Ramirez, etc. in a solo recording. Like I said, there were various slight design permutations along the way; mine had an F-hole and even a volume control on the face (i.e., Strat) so I could really adjust things on the fly (even doing a nylon-string volume swell if I felt like it. Cool!). These are still sometimes available on eBay for little money (got mine for only $200) but don't let that affect your perception of their worth since (IMO) great Yamaha instruments never seem to sell for what they're worth. Good luck if you're still searching.

  29. #28

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    I've used Yamaha AEX-500/very nice guitar/.I play actually Frameworks. Slim-Neck Nylon Guitar for Jazz-k-wolinski-bansko-2002-jpgSlim-Neck Nylon Guitar for Jazz-k-wolinski-1-jpg
    Last edited by kris; 05-24-2013 at 03:58 PM.

  30. #29

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    Ha! Yup, that blonde one's just like mine. Nice guitar!

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by ooglybong
    Ha! Yup, that blonde one's just like mine. Nice guitar!
    This guitar Yamaha AEX-500 will be great with a little bigger nut /like 48 mm/ and a little better piezzo pick up .
    Anyway it was comfortable to play,no feedback,nice semi-hollow construction.
    not expensive...+1..:-)

  32. #31

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    My guitar teacher has a Yamaha AEX-500 and it's a great guitar. Really comfortable neck, and the tone is quite nice. Would like to get myself one someday.

  33. #32

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    There are two great Jazz players out of Houston who I can think of who use a Godin Multiac Grand Concert. There's John Calderon, a fantastic and versatile guitarist, who recently toured with Al Jarreau. Then there's one of my many teachers, Paul Chester, who is one of the top dogs in Houston. I've actually sat down with Paul on a few occasions and talked about that guitar. He says the electronics are top notch. He seemed especially pleased with the mic simulations on the guitar. I got to play his once. It was well set up, and played very easily, I suppose due to a combination of nylon's low string tension and Paul's low action. I noticed it had quality woods, too, like an ebony fingerboard, a mahogany neck, and a top which I guess was cedar.

    In summary, well-made guitar, praise-worthy electronics, not such an unbearable price tag. ($1,500, I think.)

  34. #33

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    Cervantes Crossover is exactly what you're looking for:
    Cervantes Fine Classical Guitars, Hauser Concert

  35. #34

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    Old thread, but no mention of the Cervantes Crossover?

    Slightly different price range that the Buscarino Cabaret.

  36. #35

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    I posted a new thread on this topic but as this is a thread devoted to nylon players maybe I should put it out there . Been trying to solve the difficulty of pick 'click' on nylon strings, the result of the pick hitting off a vibrating string, more problematic on nylon strings. I'm wondering if anyone has any techniques or ideas about this as it can be pretty horrible sounding at times. Looking at things like changing the angle of the pick, making my picking strokes faster, muting etc but not much success...

  37. #36

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    Try Delrin picks or the Clayton brand of picks, they have a less brittle surface and sound more like fingernails.

  38. #37

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    Have you checked out the Godin LaPatrie Hybrid (with cutaway), nylon strings, accoustic/electric. Sounds fine played through Polytone (circa 1978) amp. btw with a pick. My nails refuse to cooperate.

  39. #38

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    I recommend the Breedlove Bossa Nova:

    BREEDLOVE BOSSA NOVA W/HSC (BBN) - Elderly Instruments

    It's very similar to the Taylor nylon crossovers, but the electronics are WAY better on the Breedlove. The one pictured in the link has a Fishman pickup system. That's not what you want. The newer ones have a Baggs Dual Source pickup/mic system that sounds really great and is much easier to control than the Fishman: iMix Acoustic Guitar Pickup - Microphone Mixing Systems | LR Baggs

    I had a Bossa Nova that I sold recently because I needed an ES335 & couldn't justify the nylon string on my budget. But, it was a fabulous guitar.

  40. #39

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    yamaha aex500n, was my main weapon of choice at one point amazing guitar... you can also look at the guild gc-2 or godin multaics...

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by calgarc
    yamaha aex500n, was my main weapon of choice at one point amazing guitar... you can also look at the guild gc-2 or godin multaics...
    Slim-Neck Nylon Guitar for Jazz-k-wolinski-yamaha-aex-500n-jpgAEX 500 N...really nice!

  42. #41

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    Quote Originally Posted by kris
    Slim-Neck Nylon Guitar for Jazz-k-wolinski-yamaha-aex-500n-jpgAEX 500 N...really nice!
    i had modded mine by adding a metal tailpiece and jazz strings

    Slim-Neck Nylon Guitar for Jazz-cimg00051-e1352591756852-jpg

  43. #42

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    Interesting!

  44. #43

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    A few years ago I bought a Godin LaPatrie Hybrid with cutaway, has a beautiful warm sound without the amp too. I'm working on chord melody in a book called Jazz Guitar Standards (Mel Bay) and am delighted with the sound of this instrument. Plus the tensile strength of these nylon strings is amazing, considering I'm using a pick . Walk by, pick it up, play a few lines and be on your way. What could be easier? Good Luck!

    Regards,

    Jim

  45. #44

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    I just bought a Yamaha SLG110N which is a bodyless guitar. It had slightly high action so I had a luthier bring it down. It is a little better now.

  46. #45

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    Those Yamaha ain't half bad...cool Lil axe.

    I can't say enough about my Godin grand concert duet ambiance. Just excellent.

  47. #46

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    Quote Originally Posted by calgarc
    i had modded mine by adding a metal tailpiece and jazz strings

    Slim-Neck Nylon Guitar for Jazz-cimg00051-e1352591756852-jpg
    What brand and thickness are considered jazz strings for a nylon string? I just put medium hards on my nylon string. I was thinking maybe I should go harder.

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    Those Yamaha ain't half bad...cool Lil axe.

    I can't say enough about my Godin grand concert duet ambiance. Just excellent.

    I can second that - I recently got my hands on a Godin Duet Ambience and it is a fabulous guitar. Strangely quite loud acoustically and lot of plugged in sound options. The neck on the guitar feels easier to play than my Ramirez classical guitar (costing twice the price). Godin also produce nylon electrics with thinner necks.

  49. #48

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    Try the Lowden S25J (cedar top) or S32J (spruce top)

  50. #49

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    I was just to my local music shop this morning and came across the Yamaha NTX900FM so I sat down with it for a half hour or so. Interesting instrument. Since no-one has really mentioned this model yet, I thought I'd offer some of my first impressions with the hopes that they might be helpful...starting with the one or two negatives, if you can call them that.

    After a lifetime of playing and making classicals, I found the acoustic sound disappointing, although not unpleasant. It seemed lacking in volume, quite understated with a somewhat muffled tone, especially the bass. It sounded a bit over built and tight...but with surprisingly great sustain throughout the range.

    Plugged in was another matter. Played through the store Yamaha THR10 it had a very pleasant warm tone, much like I'd imagine your favorite acoustic archtop equiped with nylon strings.

    Unlike most classical players, I play with a strap and either standing or sitting " traditional Flamenco style" with the lower bout of the guitar resting on my right thigh. I didn't try the NTX900FM with a strap but in my regular sitting position it felt wonderfully balanced, as it just settled in and stuck there. I'm used to the neck on my 19th century reproductions which are in the range of 44 -46+/- mm at the nut so the 48 mm nut of the Yamaha was perfect for my hand. The spacing at the bridge felt, at first, a little tighter than I'm used to (not sure what it was but most of my nylon instruments are in the 60 mm range 1st - 6th strings on center) but after playing for a few minutes I no longer noticed. I found that the neck felt fast and easy to navigate with my "classically" trained left hand. If one uses the left hand thumb over fretting, I cannot comment as I have never played that way so wouldn't really know what to look for.

    Finish and workmanship wise (the luthier eye always goes there very quickly) it's top notch with nice materials, tight joints, finely crafted details, a little heavy on the finish for my taste but nicely done...all the things one can expect from a Yamaha.

    So, as I said, these are just my impressions from a very short time with the instrument. But as a classically trained player/builder looking to dabble in jazz it's an instrument that I was thinking to build for my own use...now that someone else already did and at a very reasonable price, I don't have to...
    Last edited by Scot Tremblay; 01-25-2014 at 04:49 PM.

  51. #50

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    Scott - Taking into consideration especially your experience as a luthier, I would love to hear your opinion on a question of mine regarding a classical guitar with a cutaway designed for playing jazz.

    I have nearly a half century of playing experience, starting with a few years of classical training as a callow youth. I would consider myself an advanced player in terms of technique and musicianship. I have played a relatively inexpensive Yamaha classical as my main classical guitar since the Eighties, though I often play a Yamaha short scale originally intended for my young son years ago. But I would like a jazz-oriented classical guitar with a cutaway and amplification, perhaps a 630 or 640 mm scale, that would achieve a balance between sustain and clarity of individual notes for playing solo and 'chamber' jazz guitar in the Martin Taylor - Joe Pass style. Unfortunately, I suspect that the cost of a commissioned custom instrument might be out of reach in terms of financials right now.

    So, if you were looking for an non-custom designed classical maker, where would you look? I am familiar with the Godin classicals and own an LGX- SA (synth access) electric, but I'm not totally enamored of the multiac classical sound. In my original conception of an ideal classical I also originally wanted to incorporate a hexaphonic style pickup for driving my Roland guitar synth and for use with notation software (Sibelius), but lately I think that is less of a priority than a fine jazz nylon sound. For the moment my use of the guitar will be directed primarily toward recording.

    I know there are other options including Buscarino, Hill, and Sand guitars, but I suspect they might be out of reach financially, though I know Hill makes some short scale models. Any thought on your end on alternatives? Or should I take a chance on an upcoming luthier for a custom guitar?

    Jay