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  1. #1

    Piano players aren't always best... An argument for guitar as the harmonic instrument

    Quick post, to rally the guitar playing masses:

    Guitar is better than piano because:

    We can tune the instrument on the spot. I think I found it, the reason why we are better.

    Yeah, they can play denser chords, bass lines with more movement, they have a wider range...

    But an out of tune piano ain't worth its salt on the stage, especially if it ain't in tune to itself.

    Can I get an amen?



    That sounded slightly out of tune as well.

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  3. #2
    amen

  4. #3
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    And it is a helluva lot lighter to carry around....

  5. #4
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    Amen!!!

  6. #5
    Touching the strings both on the fretting end and plucking end is a big advantage for expression.

  7. #6
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    Have to play devils advocate that's just me....

    Without a piano I have to provide the harmony all night.
    Without a piano there is no harmony behind my solo (hummm get away with murder there).
    Without a piano no place to put my drink and it not get knocked over.
    Without a piano if I don't know the tune I have to dance.
    Without a piano I have to create intro's and ending's to everything.
    Without a piano who am I going to get a ride to the gig with the bass and drummer's cars are full of gear.
    Without a piano who can I point at when sax doesn't like the chords behind his solo.
    Without a piano player who's going to book the gigs the trumpet player?
    Without a piano usually the straight laced guy in the group who are we going to leave the check with at Denny's.
    Without a piano player who's going to find the rest of the band when the break is over.
    Without a piano player who we going to send the drunk with a request to.
    Without a piano player who we going to blame that we can't (don't want to) play that request.
    Without a piano player who going yell at us for wearing jeans to a wedding gig.

    The piano player has a very important role in the band.
    Last edited by docbop; 12-20-2015 at 04:31 PM.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  8. #7
    Sonny Rollins, for the most part, always uses a guitar and not a piano for his group. He considers the piano too dominant an instrument and and the piano generally steers the song harmonically, rhythmically, etc. and Sonny wants to steer the song..
    Last edited by Flat5; 12-21-2015 at 01:53 AM.

  9. #8
    for comping piano wins. for every decent guitar comper there'll be 10 piano players who could do it better

  10. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzguy100 View Post
    for comping piano wins. for every decent guitar comper there'll be 10 piano players who could do it better
    There's a lot of truth in that, unfortunately.

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    wes does not try to comp like wynton

    wes does guitar comping - and it has some very groovy features

    (but it ain't bill evans comping that's for sure)

  12. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Flat5 View Post
    Sonny Rollins, for the most part, always uses a guitar and not a piano for his group. He considers the piano too dominant an instrument and and the piano generally steers the song harmonically, rhythmically, etc. and Sonny wants to steer the song..
    All my favourite Rollins records have piano.

  13. #12
    Ornette didn't use the piano after the first couple/few albums did he? Like many melodic players he structured the music from the top down. And of course he started to use guitar players later on. Off topic slightly but I read that he said that the Rhythm Changes bridge was how he first learned to go outside the home key.

  14. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Irez87 View Post
    Quick post, to rally the guitar playing masses:

    Guitar is better than piano because:

    We can tune the instrument on the spot. I think I found it, the reason why we are better.

    Yeah, they can play denser chords, bass lines with more movement, they have a wider range...

    But an out of tune piano ain't worth its salt on the stage, especially if it ain't in tune to itself.

    Can I get an amen?
    Welcome back, Irez!

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    Quote Originally Posted by jazzguy100 View Post
    for comping piano wins. for every decent guitar comper there'll be 10 piano players who could do it better
    I think part of it is the difference in how they learn. Piano player start with more focus on chords and accompanying singers and other instruments. So they've worked on it a lot more a good accompanist piano player keep busy rehearsing and backing singers. Guitarist especially in the past few decades focus on is getting to solo ASAP accompanying other is usually something they come to later. Piano player can play notes with both hands so work in playing tunes and accompanying themselves. They just come up with a ear for comping for themselves and others.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

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    There is no better or worse...it depends on the player.

    But among the amateur (and often the pro!) ranks, I think guitar is better than piano as a harmonic instrument because, basically, comping is OPTIONAL. It should not be like this omnipresent thing constantly playing for the sake of playing. The guitar's limitations lead to less playing, which generally is a good thing.

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    hey erez..see my snark tuner thread!! haha

    good seeing you here bud..miss your posts


    cheers

  18. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by jazzguy100 View Post
    for comping piano wins. for every decent guitar comper there'll be 10 piano players who could do it better
    Might be the truth among professional piano players with good taste. And there sure is an abundance of great piano comping compared to guitar comping on records. However there is nothing I dislike more aesthetically than piano players who can't stop playing and there are just so many of them out there especially at jam sessions in my experience. I seriously consider stopping comping all together for the sake of the music when playing with a (busy) piano player. The music gets no breath at all!

  19. #18
    There's a tension between what an instrument is naturally good at vs. what requires extraordinary effort.

    A horn has extraordinary facility when it comes to single line playing. Steve Lacy called the saxophone an "interval machine." It also lends itself to phrasing and dynamics in a way that an electric guitar doesn't, and can cut through a band mix in a way that an acoustic guitar can't.

    A keyboard player can play chordal, harmonic, and contrapuntal ideas that a guitarist can only dream of.

    But a guitar can play chords much easier than a horn (no need to resort to multiphonics like a sax player).

    A guitar has more options for phrasing, vibrato, glissandi, etc. than a keyboard player.

    And there are other unique things about it. Electric guitars better manage the tension between electric/acoustic than any other instrument. It takes effects more easily/naturally than other instruments.

    Some guitarists would probably be happier if they did play piano or sax. If you're not going to utilize some of the unique characteristics of the instrument, why bother?

  20. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by princeplanet View Post
    All my favourite Rollins records have piano.
    Better than "The Bridge"?

  21. #20
    I am finally on break for a week so I can breath a little more... work is work as always (but the kids are alright)



    There are a lot of horn players who prefer working with horn players:

    1. Paul Desmond

    2. Art Farmer

    3. Sonny Rollins

    4. Mark Turner

    That's just a start...

    They all seem to say the same thing. A guitarist allows them to:

    1. Have more space

    2. Have more freedom

    3. Use melodic space more effectively

    4. Be more adventurous

    There is this myth that bigger is better. With music... nope!

    A. Look at Jim Hall's comping

    1. shell voicings

    2. embedded octave voicings

    3. Drop 2/ Drop 3 traditional voicings

    4. The "Jim Hall" altered chord

    5. A keen ear to rhythm and pulse

    B. Look at Ed Bickert's comping

    1. shell voicings

    2. embedded octave voicings

    3. upper extension triads

    4. augmented triad forms

    5. diminished movements

    6. the best ear for pulse and rhythm outside of Freddie Green

    Let me explain that last point. Listen to Bill Evans play piano. I mean, really listen. Forget the harmonies for a second, listen to the rhythmic placement of his chordal hits. Got it?

    Now right after, listen to Ed Bickert playing behind a horn player. My favorite example is Ed playing behind Frank Rosalino, as the sound quality is better than that Paul Desmond joint (two great albums, actually) and you can actually hear Ed's brilliance.

    Okay, notice any similarities?

    I'll provide some examples (remember that I am a teacher, I have to do this kinda "modeling" for a living... for better or worse...)





    Hear it? Listen real close. This deals with that principal of phraseology that I talked about. That's an idea I got from Bruce Arnold, but it's an idea that's been used almost since the dawn of written down music.

    I love the guitar, I couldn't see myself playing the piano or the sax. I used to be jealous. But hey, at the end of the day, the guitar still is the coolest instrument around. Why else would it be such a "chick magnet"? (my apologies for the sexism, but it's true. It is hard to ignore the allure of the guitar)

    I'd also like to add, that if guitarists practice ear training as much as we do technique, we can be better listeners and more responsive compers than pianists... Just saying. Pianists are great to have in an outfit, but sometimes they don't know how to listen. They just know how to speak. You get my drift? A little ego with your altered chord, you say?
    Last edited by Irez87; 12-24-2015 at 07:47 AM.

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by yaclaus View Post
    Might be the truth among professional piano players with good taste. And there sure is an abundance of great piano comping compared to guitar comping on records. However there is nothing I dislike more aesthetically than piano players who can't stop playing and there are just so many of them out there especially at jam sessions in my experience. I seriously consider stopping comping all together for the sake of the music when playing with a (busy) piano player. The music gets no breath at all!
    YES! YES! and YES!

    Finally, someone understands my plight!

  23. #22
    destinytot Guest
    Great comment, but this looks like a typo - shouldn't it read "...prefer working with guitar players"?
    Quote Originally Posted by Irez87 View Post
    ...

    There are a lot of horn players who prefer working with horn players:
    ...
    Seasons greetings, man!

  24. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by coolvinny View Post
    Better than "The Bridge"?
    Yes.

  25. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by princeplanet View Post
    Yes.
    Ooohhh. OK, I agree to disagree. But to demonstrate my non-guitar bias, my favorite albums are where neither piano or drums are comping, i.e. where you have two horns with one "comping" or playing lines behind the other. Oh yeah, that's the juice.

  26. #25
    The entire Symphony is in the piano. No instrument can touch its range and versatility, IMO.

    Many piano players won't touch a piano that's not in tune, and if the piano requires tuning they'll simply arrive early and tune the piano before the gig - themselves. So much for not having a piano in tune

    "better" is always subjective to your ear

  27. #26
    Probably true about entire Symphony in the Piano..

    And they have the entire overview because of the range of the Instrument .

    But they can' t play a Unison or bend notes
    attack the strings differently..vibrato..etc.

  28. #27
    Robertkoa has a point.

    A symphony encompasses string instruments, no? Although we can't utilize a bow, we can utilize vibrato and get a more vocal quality to our sound.

    Wasn't it Segovia who said that a guitar is like looking at a symphony through the wrong end of binoculars. Can someone fact check and correct that quote?

    George Van Eps is proof that the guitar can be just as dynamic an just as symphonic as the piano. 2born2bop, I don't know that many piano players who are also piano turners themselves. Tuning a piano is not as easy as tuning a guitar. That's why we don't hire guitar tuners to tune a guitar. I am sure at the highest level, concert pianists can do rudimentary tuning. But the entire piano?

    And I second the notion of pianists at jam sessions. Hep knows this well, but sometimes a pianist doesn't know when to shut the heck up. Even professional pianists are guilty of this. Listen more, play less.

    That being said, playing with a good pianist makes the stage feel like a cloud. You just float. I was once told by a famous author that "a good [pianist] is hard to find"...
    Last edited by Irez87; 12-25-2015 at 09:48 AM.

  29. #28
    destinytot Guest
    I think guitar enhances this symphonic sound - choir and all - in a way that piano couldn't. The effect of piano could be more, less or equally beautiful - but it would be different to guitar.


    And I find it telling that pianist Bobby Timmons was on this session, but that Wes plays on this little gem:
    Last edited by destinytot; 12-25-2015 at 11:02 AM. Reason: spelling

  30. #29

    Piano players aren't always best... An argument for guitar as the harmonic in...

    In many cases the guitar functions more like a Hammond B3 organ than a piano. Kenny Burrell for example:

    If you replace a piano with a guitar in a band, you've got a totally different ensemble. The guitar has many limitations, but its much more versatile than piano.
    Last edited by KirkP; 12-25-2015 at 12:48 PM.

  31. #30
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    IMO electric guitar beats electronic stage piano. Acoustic piano is great, but those things are hateful.

    I like Rhodes or Organ if Piano is not an option. Nord Stage Piano still sounds better as Rhodes or Organ than piano.

    While, like Rhodes or Organ, an electric guitar isn't being anything but itself.

    Also - guitarists should stop trying to comp like pianists. I catch myself at it a lot. Don't listen to pianists. It'll only cause heartache ;-)

    Apart from maybe McCoy Tyner...
    Last edited by christianm77; 12-25-2015 at 04:22 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Irez87 View Post
    Robertkoa has a point.

    A symphony encompasses string instruments, no? Although we can't utilize a bow, we can utilize vibrato and get a more vocal quality to our sound.

    Wasn't it Segovia who said that a guitar is like looking at a symphony through the wrong end of binoculars. Can someone fact check and correct that quote?

    George Van Eps is proof that the guitar can be just as dynamic an just as symphonic as the piano. 2born2bop, I don't know that many piano players who are also piano turners themselves. Tuning a piano is not as easy as tuning a guitar. That's why we don't hire guitar tuners to tune a guitar. I am sure at the highest level, concert pianists can do rudimentary tuning. But the entire piano?

    And I second the notion of pianists at jam sessions. Hep knows this well, but sometimes a pianist doesn't know when to shut the heck up. Even professional pianists are guilty of this. Listen more, play less.

    That being said, playing with a good pianist makes the stage feel like a cloud. You just float. I was once told by a famous author that "a good [pianist] is hard to find"...
    Yes - George Van Eps. Didn't his wife say 'they've invented the piano, you know' or is that an urban myth?

    And of course, do we have any idea of just how many years of striving it took George to be able to do what he did. And do you know who listens to him?

    Guitarists.

    Everyone else likes a guitarist who sounds like a guitar player. They don't care how many years you sweated on your voicings, how long it takes to do what pianists can do in their sleep.

    They'll listen to Grant Green...

    I think Peter Bernstein has it pegged. Guitaristic jazz.

    (Bill Frisell too, of course. And Sco. And Metheny. And the Swing cats, and the Bossa guys... They USE the guitar.)
    Last edited by christianm77; 12-25-2015 at 04:21 PM.

  33. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by destinytot View Post
    I think guitar enhances this symphonic sound - choir and all - in a way that piano couldn't. The effect of piano could be more, less or equally beautiful - but it would be different to guitar.


    And I find it telling that pianist Bobby Timmons was on this session, but that Wes plays on this little gem:
    Didn't Wes normally play with a piano?

    On Smokin' at the Half Note he comps for Wynton, he really drives the rhythm. Not that Wynton NEEDS that, but it adds for sure.

    Jim Mullen's comping is like that too...

  34. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Irez87 View Post
    Robertkoa has a point.

    A symphony encompasses string instruments, no? Although we can't utilize a bow, we can utilize vibrato and get a more vocal quality to our sound.

    Wasn't it Segovia who said that a guitar is like looking at a symphony through the wrong end of binoculars. Can someone fact check and correct that quote?

    George Van Eps is proof that the guitar can be just as dynamic an just as symphonic as the piano. 2born2bop, I don't know that many piano players who are also piano turners themselves. Tuning a piano is not as easy as tuning a guitar. That's why we don't hire guitar tuners to tune a guitar. I am sure at the highest level, concert pianists can do rudimentary tuning. But the entire piano?

    And I second the notion of pianists at jam sessions. Hep knows this well, but sometimes a pianist doesn't know when to shut the heck up. Even professional pianists are guilty of this. Listen more, play less.

    That being said, playing with a good pianist makes the stage feel like a cloud. You just float. I was once told by a famous author that "a good [pianist] is hard to find"...
    I personally know many jazz pianists who tune and voice a piano. I know many whose day job is piano tuning...hint, it pays more than their gig. Tuning requires experience yes, but not unlike anything else, we become what we choose to practice.

    Keith Jarrett tunes and voices piano...it's not as uncommon as one might think is all I'm sayin'

    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    IMO electric guitar beats electronic stage piano. Acoustic piano is great, but those things are hateful.

    I like Rhodes or Organ if Piano is not an option. Nord Stage Piano still sounds better as Rhodes or Organ than piano.

    While, like Rhodes or Organ, an electric guitar isn't being anything but itself.

    Also - guitarists should stop trying to comp like pianists. I catch myself at it a lot. Don't listen to pianists. It'll only cause heartache ;-)

    Apart from maybe McCoy Tyner...
    "Hateful?"

    Hey, it's a guitar forum, I get it. I simply chimed in to acknowledge there are realities about the instrument, and playing, from a pianistic perspective, that your average guitar player, jazz or otherwise, isn't aware of...and vice versa...no two piano players play alike...same for guitar players, yes. It's all music...good, better, best doesn't enter into the equation for me personally, for if it's music it's all good

    On a professional jazz level, it's quite common to have rudimentary knowledge of the piano...Miles, Dexter Gordon, Dizzy Gillespie, Arturo Sandoval, just to name a few, all played, or play, piano at a respectable level.

    Enjoy!


  35. #34
    destinytot Guest
    Looking forward to having fun playing around with this next week:

  36. #35
    I actually like guitar players who don't ALWAYS sound like guitar players.

    They've figured out a way to transcend the instrument

    Think Star Child from 2001: A Space Odyssey


    Jim Hall did that

    Ed Bickert did that as well

    Lenny Breau

    I still love Wes for being Wes. But I know that he wasn't the end all be all. But his pocket, yikes!

    You could fit the entire world in Wes Montgomery's pocket and still have room for the Moon, you know what I'm saying?

  37. #36
    Wes played in the pocket that's for sure.

  38. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by destinytot View Post
    Looking forward to having fun playing around with this next week:
    OK I want one!

  39. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop View Post
    "Hateful?"

    Hey, it's a guitar forum, I get it. I simply chimed in to acknowledge there are realities about the instrument, and playing, from a pianistic perspective, that your average guitar player, jazz or otherwise, isn't aware of...and vice versa...no two piano players play alike...same for guitar players, yes. It's all music...good, better, best doesn't enter into the equation for me personally, for if it's music it's all good

    On a professional jazz level, it's quite common to have rudimentary knowledge of the piano...Miles, Dexter Gordon, Dizzy Gillespie, Arturo Sandoval, just to name a few, all played, or play, piano at a respectable level.

    Enjoy!

    Hateful, yes. There's nothing sadder than hearing a pianist with an excellent classical technique being crippled by having to play an 'instrument' like a stage piano. It would drive me up the wall if I were in their shoes.

    We'd all be better if we learned to play piano and drums, for sure.

    I tinkle around a bit on piano, but I'm not doing that in public any time soon...

  40. #39
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    One thing about the guitar is that it's homogeneous, as one guy put it. It blends well. When playing 4/4 behind a bass solo, for example, the sound blends well with the drummer's high-hat. Piano is more percussive, and doesn't blend as well with horns, etc. for unisons. It can be done, but guitar is better for that, I believe. But, of course, a listening pianist will blend and find ways to be less percussive.

    The essence of comping on guitar or piano is listening and supporting, some would add goading if the player soloing likes aggressive rhythm players. With singers it's a different ball game: bring them out and help them sound good, or you won't be called again. But---guitar or piano---it's not the instrument, it's the ears...
    Last edited by fasstrack; 09-08-2016 at 07:33 PM.

  41. #40
    +1 on the "hateful" digital "pianos" ......I had the misfortune to go to some sessions with
    a trio of electric piano, bass guitar and drums.
    Jeez.....whadda nightmare ....I show up with my Howard Roberts fusion with 13-53 flats
    and proceed to add to the murk......

    I've never quite recovered from that horrible noise that resulted.
    Like......gloop city.
    I hadn't played in a group setting for quite a while ....and thought that it was all my fault.
    I left the room to compose my cool with a drink so I didn't say something I regretted.

    .....Long story short....the piano player who was pretty good, had an upright "steam" piano in the corner
    of the room and I suggested he try it on the next number....a Brazilian thing....sounded way better straight
    away.
    Clearer separation ....except for that pesky bass guitar....oh well.

    So the next time we got together, I changed my setup to some lighter round wounds ....worked better
    but the piano player insisted on playing his horrible Korg thing.

    I bailed at this point because there were no gigs in the offing ....so no lost income....it wasn't worth
    changing my concept of sound to fit in with these guys.

    So Christian......I salute you for calling a spade a spade .....and I'd rather gig with a spade wielder than
    an electric piano.
    [Rhodes OK ....real or simulated and B3 ditto]

    However.....every man has his price.....that may be why my phone doesn't ring much these days.

  42. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Groyniad View Post
    wes does not try to comp like wynton

    wes does guitar comping - and it has some very groovy features

    (but it ain't bill evans comping that's for sure)
    So who was a better comper? I'm sure the answer will probably be Bill Evans.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  43. #42
    I like playing with pianists, but some of them do have overly busy fingers. And a pianist with bad rhythm is a walking trainwreck. But I do like someone comping behind me.

    I don't see why one wouldn't want to play the guitar as a guitar. I think there are things we can take from the piano. I think too many guitarists (myself included, and most folks coming from a rock background) tend to play too "blocky". We can afford to add more motion to what we do. That's something we can look to pianists for, but I think it's possible to do that without developing too much "keyboard envy".

    I'll break with some of the folks here on the electric pianos. One of my favorite local players uses a Nord, and I think he sounds terrific. He'd rather play on a real piano, of course, but I'll take an in-tune Nord over an out of tune piano any day. (Granted, nothing in the world sounds like a nicely tuned concert grand - I think its the apex of acoustic instrument design - but that's not the usual equipment at jam sessions and low-rent gigs.)
    "I'm opposed to picketing, but I don't know to show it." --Mitch Hedberg

  44. #43
    Old thread, but good topic.

    Here's what I don't like about some pianists:

    1. They insist on playing a grand piano if there is one. Takes up half the stage. Keeps the musicians from being able to see each other easily. Sacrifices control over the volume. Gives one sound whereas an electronic kb has options. And, of course, it might not be in tune.

    2. Most pianists have spent a good deal of time playing tunes, solo. Some do exactly the same thing even if there's a group. They fill a lot of space, play too busy, play dense chords in the frequencies that should be left for bass or soloists.

    3. Many pianists, no matter how well meaning, do not leave much space for guitar. The pianist who does leave space is generally emphasizing transitions and decoration, not pounding out the beat in the middle of the bars. The pianist who does busy, random stick-and-jab comping makes it very difficult for the guitarist (well, at least me) to find a part that will enhance the band.

    4. With some, I may spend extended periods laying out. That is rarely reciprocated.

    5. If the pianist brings an electronic kb and amplification, many play overly loud.

    Now, to talk out of the other side of my mouth, I do know some players where the guitar and piano work together effortlessly. In those cases they leave a lot of space, let the bass and drums carry the "chop" to a greater extent and don't pound out a busy rhythmic figure.

    Of course, guitarists may be even worse. But I'll leave that for a different post.

    If I was a singer/leader hiring a trio, I'd lean toward piano, simply because they can solo and comp at the same time. That's much more difficult on guitar.

    But, I've done plenty of gigs with guitar as the only comping instrument. It works fine. The trick, to me, is to get away from the idea of playing block chords all the time. So, the "comp" ends up being a stew of chords, single notes, double stops, passing tones while holding a note on a different string, silence while the bassist does it all, in different octaves etc. I got the basic idea by listening to Ralph Sharon, Tony Bennett's long term pianist. I noticed that every time a tune reached the bridge, he didn't simply pound out the chords. Instead, he'd start playing a little melody a bar or two early that led gracefully to the bridge. I thought it was brilliant (even though it may be commonplace for pianists to do this) and tried to emulate it on guitar.

  45. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by FZ2017 View Post
    So who was a better comper? I'm sure the answer will probably be Bill Evans.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I accidentally liked this post.

    I honestly don’t know. I think ideas like ‘better’ are a bit childish when we are talking about players of that level.

    BE had more harmonic concept for sure. A different style of jazz musician. But Wes could lock in like anything, and if you are a guitar comping for piano it’s a different relationship.

    Listen to Jim Hall comping for Bill Evans. Simple commonplace voicings, maximum effect.... Quite a few players probably know more chords than Jim, but it doesn’t make them a better comper...

  46. #45
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    I accidentally liked this post.

    I honestly don’t know. I think ideas like ‘better’ are a bit childish when we are talking about players of that level.

    BE had more harmonic concept for sure. A different style of jazz musician. But Wes could lock in like anything, and if you are a guitar comping for piano it’s a different relationship.

    Listen to Jim Hall comping for Bill Evans. Simple commonplace voicings, maximum effect.... Quite a few players probably know more chords than Jim, but it doesn’t make them a better comper...
    That's true note/chord choices aside comping can be done quite well with good rhythm chops.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  47. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by 2bornot2bop View Post
    The entire Symphony is in the piano. No instrument can touch its range and versatility, IMO.

    Many piano players won't touch a piano that's not in tune, and if the piano requires tuning they'll simply arrive early and tune the piano before the gig - themselves. So much for not having a piano in tune

    "better" is always subjective to your ear
    I didn't know that. I thought most pianists don't know how to tune a piano! I don't but I've learned/learning on a digital piano.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  48. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by Robertkoa View Post
    Probably true about entire Symphony in the Piano..

    And they have the entire overview because of the range of the Instrument .

    But they can' t play a Unison or bend notes
    attack the strings differently..vibrato..etc.
    They can play in unison with another piano.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  49. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77 View Post
    IMO electric guitar beats electronic stage piano. Acoustic piano is great, but those things are hateful.

    I like Rhodes or Organ if Piano is not an option. Nord Stage Piano still sounds better as Rhodes or Organ than piano.

    While, like Rhodes or Organ, an electric guitar isn't being anything but itself.

    Also - guitarists should stop trying to comp like pianists. I catch myself at it a lot. Don't listen to pianists. It'll only cause heartache ;-)

    Apart from maybe McCoy Tyner...
    Just out of curiosity why McCoy Tyner? Because he had a more percussive style?

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  50. When I was in Chicago in the '90's, the old bebop horn players really disliked electric keyboards They would put up with a terrible out of tune piano if the venue had one, but would hire guitarist over a keyboardist if there was no house piano (Hammond B3 were a different story...) I was just starting out on the scene and grateful to be hired in those situations as often as I was....

    PK

  51. #50
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by FZ2017 View Post
    Just out of curiosity why McCoy Tyner? Because he had a more percussive style?

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    I think I was thinking about the quartal stuff he does which translates well.

    But last night I listened to his beautiful comping on Coltrane ballads. Heartache ensues again...

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