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  1. #31
    Just wanted to add that I've added another review to the second review post (the one that starts with Dugain picks). It's a review of Zenfire picks, a company I had never ever heard of and was pleasantly surprised by.

  2. #32
    Just added a few more reviews to the 2nd post.

  3. #33
    Join Date
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    I use Blue Chip Jazz 60's on both electrics; I only bought 2, but I have 7 - I put them on my XMAS list every year! I use Dunlop John Petrucci Ultex Jazz III's on my acoustics - I can afford to buy those myself!
    "Next to knowing when to seize an opportunity, the most important thing in life is knowing when to forego an advantage." - Benjamin Disraeli
    http://www.youtube.com/user/TKOProd/videos

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by jzucker View Post
    When I find a pick I like, I usually buy a couple gross of them (144==1 gross) because manufacturing changes as do the specs.
    Good thinking! I just bought a gross of the Traynor Delrin Jazz picks.

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by GuyBoden View Post
    I like poly carbonate picks, I cut a triangle from a sheet of poly carbonate, shape it on a grinding wheel, when I like the shape I then buff it on a buffer wheel. Poly Carbonate is very tough and doesn't sound clicky like most plastics.
    I recently discovered these ones from Dunlop, made of polycarbonate, are perfect for gypsy jazz, kind of like a Wegen's Fatone, but smaller ala Jazz III. The perfect mix for my personal taste and style! I am using it on my LP Custom and L5 and they are not clicky (as the Dugain wood) and also give great picking attack while being awesome for comping.
    I am using the smaller version, 5mm.


    http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/Primetone-picks

  6. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by anothersixstringer View Post
    I recently discovered these ones from Dunlop, made of polycarbonate, are perfect for gypsy jazz, kind of like a Wegen's Fatone, but smaller ala Jazz III. The perfect mix for my personal taste and style! I am using it on my LP Custom and L5 and they are not clicky (as the Dugain wood) and also give great picking attack while being awesome for comping.
    I am using the smaller version, 5mm.


    http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/Primetone-picks
    These Primetones are one of the only production line picks that I still haven't tried. I'm gonna order the large pointed tip and see how they stack up to everything else.


    Btw has anybody ever seen these Dunlop Speedpicks? They have a tip that's twisted 10 degrees. I never knew they existed.

    http://www.juststrings.com/dun-h10j.html
    Last edited by bluewaterpig; 03-23-2014 at 09:35 PM.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Miami, Fl
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    How many of you use different picks for different situations, styles, or guitars? Who uses a pick that is so tough to replace that they must preserve it with their lives?

    I found a pick that worked for me many years ago and bought a hundred of them hoping that they will last for many years to come.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    860
    Quote Originally Posted by Klatu View Post
    How many of you use different picks for different situations, styles, or guitars? Who uses a pick that is so tough to replace that they must preserve it with their lives?

    I found a pick that worked for me many years ago and bought a hundred of them hoping that they will last for many years to come.
    I use Wegen picks pretty much exclusively these days:

    - 7mm with my gypsy guitar
    - 3.5mm for my Eastman 403
    - 5mm Fatone for my Godin Kingpin
    - 5mm Trimus for my Eastman 905 rhythm guitar
    - 2.5mm for my strats/teles

    Picks are cheap,even at $20/30 a pop. How much do you spend on strings in 1 year?

    If you're happy with a $0.25 plastic pick and it gives you the sound and feel you're after, more power to you. Some of us have different needs.

  9. #39
    just tried blue chip 1.5 fender shape w speed bevel.
    hated it
    too bright on everything.
    got it because i played a lager triangular c. theile one for a minute and liked it, may try that

  10. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by D.G. View Post
    I use Wegen picks pretty much exclusively these days:

    - 7mm with my gypsy guitar
    - 3.5mm for my Eastman 403
    - 5mm Fatone for my Godin Kingpin
    - 5mm Trimus for my Eastman 905 rhythm guitar
    - 2.5mm for my strats/teles

    Picks are cheap,even at $20/30 a pop. How much do you spend on strings in 1 year?

    If you're happy with a $0.25 plastic pick and it gives you the sound and feel you're after, more power to you. Some of us have different needs.
    I wrote my post at work and see that the sentence "Who uses a pick that is so tough to replace that they must preserve it with their lives?" is so clumsily worded as to sound antagonistically rhetorical, even though I meant it as a straight forward question. Boredom + sleep deprivation = sloppy

    That said, I've got a couple of Wegen picks that I use on my Dell Arte gypsy guitar. It provides a brighter, louder sound than my usual pick, so I use it when I want to try and massacre the gypsy genre. When I use that guitar to pick out some acoustic standards, I stick with my usual pick.

    The cheap plastic pick I've found that really does suit my needs is the Jim Dunlop Jazztone 207. It's a thick, stiff pick at around 1.5mm and has a rounded tip which reduces the pick's effect on attack. It comes closer to the sound of a thumb than any other plastic pick I've come across. I encourage jazz guitarists to check out the Dunlop Jazztone series. They are well made with the jazz guitar community in mind.

    As far as annual expenditures on strings, I spend far less that I probably should! I use D'Addario Chrome flatwounds on my electrics and only change them about twice a year, which comes to about $60 a year. My acoustic archtops with floating pickups get D'Addario roundwound EJ21s. At 5 bucks a pack, I tend to change them 3 times per year on average. My acoustics get D'Addario phosphor bronze strings, which thankfully aren't expensive either.

  11. #41
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    Jun 2009
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    Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by D.G. View Post
    Picks are cheap,even at $20/30 a pop. How much do you spend on strings in 1 year?

    If you're happy with a $0.25 plastic pick and it gives you the sound and feel you're after, more power to you. Some of us have different needs.
    I spend about $20/year on strings. TI Swing flatwounds last forever!

  12. #42
    I'm finding I like different picks, depending on guitar or tone i'm after. Mostly on electrics; on my acoustics I pretty much stick with a Red Bear.

    On my electrics, I have Dunlop Ultex heavy, Dunlop XL JAzz III red, and today I just got some white 1.5mm Dunlop Jazz III tortex which are very nice.

    In the end, almost any pick will do, and I certainly woudn't have several different picks for different songs at a gig, but at home, it's enjoyable to experiment and experience the different feels and textures different picks provide.

    The only pick I really didn't get on with, right out of the gate, were Wegens and V-picks.

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    TN, close to Knoxville
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    824
    "Django Button (8/10) - Super fast and warm, round tone. The round shape glides over strings but can darken your tone a little too much. I never thought I'd like using a button shaped pick but I ended up liking it a lot. Try it...you might be surprised."

    These are all I use anymore. The first time I picked one up, I couldn't imagine a person using a pick completely rounded like a button, but I'm addicted to them. I wouldn't mind to find a pick like this but a little bit thicker.
    Any ideas?

    http://www.jpstrings.com/D%20Button.jpg

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    TN, close to Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melodic Dreamer View Post
    "Django Button (8/10) - Super fast and warm, round tone. The round shape glides over strings but can darken your tone a little too much. I never thought I'd like using a button shaped pick but I ended up liking it a lot. Try it...you might be surprised."

    These are all I use anymore. The first time I picked one up, I couldn't imagine a person using a pick completely rounded like a button, but I'm addicted to them. I wouldn't mind to find a pick like this but a little bit thicker.
    Any ideas?


    http://www.jpstrings.com/D%20Button.jpg
    Bumping my question once more. Any ideas?

  15. #45
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
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    V-picks offers a button pick, the "Gypsy". It is 1" in diameter and 1.5mm thick.

    Chuck

  16. #46
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    Mar 2013
    Location
    Rochester, NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Melodic Dreamer View Post
    "Django Button (8/10) - Super fast and warm, round tone. The round shape glides over strings but can darken your tone a little too much. I never thought I'd like using a button shaped pick but I ended up liking it a lot. Try it...you might be surprised."

    These are all I use anymore. The first time I picked one up, I couldn't imagine a person using a pick completely rounded like a button, but I'm addicted to them. I wouldn't mind to find a pick like this but a little bit thicker.
    Any ideas?

    http://www.jpstrings.com/D%20Button.jpg
    Michael asked Wegen Picks to make a "button" pick that is modeled after one Django had used. Not perfectly circular, but darn close: Wegen Button Pick - DjangoBooks.com

  17. #47
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Amarillo, Texas
    Posts
    64
    Picks do make a difference. I was interested in getting a woody sound from my archtop. Synthetics were not able to do there trick. It was not till I started using a maple pick that the discovery was revealed. If you would like one I can get it to you.
    Boutique Pick Reviews (BlueChip, RedBear, V-Picks, etc.)-pick-ad-png

  18. #48
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    Jun 2011
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    TN, close to Knoxville
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    Quote Originally Posted by es34569 View Post
    V-picks offers a button pick, the "Gypsy". It is 1" in diameter and 1.5mm thick.

    Chuck
    I have a handful of V-picks, not the Gypsy of course, but of the ones I own they all have a chirp to them. When picking the string one can hear a chirp like sound that after a period of time starts to degrade on ones nerves.
    Have you had any experience with this version of the V-Pick line?

  19. #49
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    Jun 2011
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    TN, close to Knoxville
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    Looks interesting, but from the image it looks a little bigger.

  20. #50
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    Jun 2011
    Location
    TN, close to Knoxville
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    How do they handle a lot of play? Do they the wear down easy?

  21. #51
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Western Pennsylvania
    Posts
    75
    MD,
    I have several versions of the v-pick, but I've never tried any of the button-shaped picks. Also, I have noticed the chirp sound to which you refer. I've tried different picks angles, but it still remains to some degree. However, I only notice the chirp unamplified. I really like the speed the v-pick material offers, and the way it sticks to your fingers. My go to pick has been the Pro Plec. I may cut a button from one of my Pro Plec's triangle shaped picks and polish the edges.
    Chuck

  22. #52
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Amarillo, Texas
    Posts
    64
    Not experience with the v- pick as described. There is s jazz pick made of hard plastic that is 3.0 mm which reminds me of what you describe. It is manufactured by Jim Dunlap. It is easy to grip and has a click sound when strumming and nice for melodic single note work.

    Another pick I like is Herco Flex 75. It's made of nylon. nice strum quality and single note.

    The cello wood pick is my new favorite.

  23. #53
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    British Columbia
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    1,144
    Quote Originally Posted by Melodic Dreamer View Post
    How do they handle a lot of play? Do they the wear down easy?
    They last a long time. After several years of constant playing, the corners get rounded a bit which makes the tone a bit mellower. This is for the Classic original. I have now switched to using a Papa's faux turtle for jazz/instrumental because I find the tone a bit smoother. But the V pick is may choice for rock.

  24. #54
    I just added a new review of the latest offering from Gravity Picks...the Sunrise. You can find it on the first page under Continued Reviews #2. ​Gravity Picks finally gave in and released a jazz oriented pick...and I absolutely love it.

  25. #55
    Reviews Continued (#3)

    Ninja Picks
    (Ninja Picks - DjangoBooks.com)

    (7.5/10) - Ninja picks seem pretty basic and straight to the point as they aren't beveled, specially shaped, or anything like that but for some reason I do like them. They have a nice release and good tone. I would say they're worth trying out.


    Moustache Picks
    (gipsy-jazz-pick, gypsy-jazz-pick, jazz-manouche pick, Moustache Guitars OR Moustache Picks - DjangoBooks.com)

    Gypsy Jazz 2mm (7/10) - I was a little frustrated with my order when I got these picks. The pick shown on the site looked great and had a nice deep bevel, but what I got barely had any slope at all. The rep at DjangoBooks said that Moustache Picks had discontinued certain models or something like that. Anyway, nothing too special about these picks, but I still reach for them over a regular plastic 351 or something like that.

    V-Picks
    (www.v-picks.com)

    Instead of reviewing every single model that I've purchased, I've decided to give a general description of V-Picks and then give a number rating to each specific model.

    I was was originally a little hesitant to try V-Picks because they seemed to cater towards metal players who wanted a brighter tone. I still don't like that their slogan is "Never Drop Your Pick Again"...I've never had a problem with holding on to picks and I didn't want to spend money on something that focused on grip instead of playability and tone. I finally gave in and ordered some Chicken Pickers. I was pleasantly surprised. They were the perfect compliment to my Telecaster on a New Orleans funky big band gig. More recently I purchased a Farley, Dimension Jr. Smokey Mountain Buffed, Infinity, and Small Pointed. They threw in a free Medium Rounded Ruby Red as a thank you, which I think they do for most orders. The "acrylic blend" that they use produces a nice bright tone but can also enhance middle and bass frequencies as well. It's also super speedy. V-Pick creator Vinni Smith is very personable and will answer any question you could possibly have including which pick is right for your playing style. He said speed bevels don't make sense to him and he couldn't apply one for me when I asked, but hey nobody's perfect. Bottom line: I definitely recommend finding a V-Pick you think suits your style and trying it out. Finding one shouldn't be a problem as they have a HUGE variety of picks covering everything from thin acoustic strummers to their ridiculously huge 11mm Insanity model.

    Chicken Picker - (8/10)

    Dimension Jr. - (8.5/10)

    Infinity - (7.5/10)

    Farley - (8/10)

    Medium Rounded - (8/10)

    Small Pointed - (8/10)

  26. #56
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Newington, CT, USA
    Posts
    87
    I have a Bluechip Jazz60 and its a little smaller than I hoped for. I have always used Dunlop Jazz iii's. Is the LG jazz60 closer to the jazz iii size, or a little bigger? I want to make sure that if I'm using my non-bluechip picks, I don't have to adjust for the size. The smaller pick definitely has taken some adjustment. I'll send it back in for replacement if anyone can tell me that LG version is closer.

    Thanks

    Dan

  27. #57
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Miami, Fl
    Posts
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    I don't have a whole lot of experience with boutique picks outside of Wegen, but I wanted to test the waters and placed an order with V Picks.

    Here are some comments on the models I received:

    V Picks
    (V-Picks Guitar Picks : Guitar & Mandolin Picks Handmade in Nashville USA | Some have called them the best guitar pick made today)

    Medium Round Pearly Gates 2.75mm: Good sound and comfortable feel, although not a significant enough improvement over my standard Jim Dunlop Jazztone 207 to warrant a switch. The tip was a bit more rounded than that of the 207.

    Bb 4.10mm: This was my favorite of the bunch. It's essentially a Medium Round pick with a far thicker profile. Although it's than I'm accustomed to, it took no time at all to get comfortable with it. The combination of heavily rounded corners with thick beveled edges produced a sound reminiscent of a thumb. This might just be the pick that I use with my acoustic archtops going forward.

    Dimension Ghost Rim 4.10mm: A bit bigger than the Medium Round, it has three usable beveled sides. The two rounded sides are slightly less rounded than that of the Medium Round, while the sharp edge is sharper than any pick I've played. I liked the rounded tips the best, but I think I might eventually find a use for the pointed end. The Ghost Rim designation is reserved for picks featuring unpolished edges. It was the Ghost Rim edges that I didn't care for. I felt that they produced a raspy sound that felt like an unpleasant aftertaste. I may order another one with the normal polished edges since everything else about the pick is spot on.

    edit: Like a good stinky cheese, I've grown fond of its strong and somewhat bitter character. I'm going to continue using the pick and get a normal polished one for comparison. At the end of the day, I think I'll be using both in order to exploit their respective strengths.
    Last edited by Klatu; 05-07-2015 at 11:06 AM.

  28. #58
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Miami, Fl
    Posts
    2,143
    Dragon's Heart Guitar Picks

    Dragon's Heart Guitar Picks - The Best Guitar Picks Available

    I wanted to add these picks to the list because they've become my picks of choice for all applications. First off, their shape is unique. The heart shaped design allows for three unique picking surfaces that work well in different applications. The main point at the bottom of the heart is the perfect alternative to my preferred pick shape, the Dunlop Jazztone 207. Its wide shoulders and slightly rounded point allow for the thickest tones I've been able to produce using a pick. Next up is the pointy tip: it's meant to approximate the function of a Dunlop Jazz III style pick. I find that while it doesn't necessarily increase my picking speed, it does tend to increase volume, so I end up using it on acoustic passages when I need that extra bit of cutting power. Finally there's the rounded edge which works best for strumming. Being that I don't strum very often, this surface doesn't get much use.

    Beyond the unique shape, the other selling point is the material from which it's crafted. It's a relatively new thermo-plastic used in high heat and long wearing engineering applications. It feels different than other plastics I've come across in that the tone it produces is slightly more "dry" (I understand that describing tone is a difficult task). Since the plastic is meant to be used in demanding applications, it resists wear to a far greater degree than any other material I've used.

    A testament to the longevity of these picks that I've been using the same pick for three months for every application including electric, acoustic, and gypsy jazz, and the pick shows no wear. I dig in on occasion when playing acoustic, so the fact that there is no evidence of wear after such use is impressive.

    Last edited by Klatu; 10-06-2015 at 08:18 AM.

  29. #59
    I tried a dragon heart pick and while it sounds fine, I simply can't hold anything but a small 358 size teardrop. If anyone in the U.S. wants to try a dragon heart shoot me a PM. I am currently away from home, my dad is very sick so I may not be home for another week or two so if you want it immediately don't bother.
    Ignorance is agony.



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