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  1. #1

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    Just stumbled on this enjoyable well paced informative video.


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    "Straight, No Chaser" has always been, for me, the quintessential jazz tune. Loves me some Monk!

    Am I the only one who finds the tri-tone not dissonant, but just richer?

    PS that Devil's interval crap was because unlike normal pitches, which prior to ET could be expressed as simple fractions, the DI never resolved. Much like pi and phi and other useful, but eely concepts.

  4. #3

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  5. #4

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    Monk harmony is a school unto itself haha. You really have to just experiment while still respecting the written melody and harmony.

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    "Straight, No Chaser" has always been, for me, the quintessential jazz tune. Loves me some Monk!

    Am I the only one who finds the tri-tone not dissonant, but just richer?

    PS that Devil's interval crap was because unlike normal pitches, which prior to ET could be expressed as simple fractions, the DI never resolved. Much like pi and phi and other useful, but eely concepts.
    B-but pi was never considered satanic, was it?

  7. #6

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    In my opinion the ideas expressed in the video reveal how the pianist/presenter interprets what Monk is doing but possibly
    nothing about how Monk himself conceived of the notes and rhythm
    that gave birth to perhaps the most unique individual voice in American
    music.

  8. #7

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    Yeah I agree. There's more to it than smashing a 7#9 chord. Monk basically explored all avenues of altered harmony that still would fit melodically and harmonically and suit his tunes and sound. You just have to listen and experiment imo. The Monk fake book does have counter melodies/parts in addition to just the lead sheet melody. That gives good insight into his method.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by citizenk74
    "Straight, No Chaser" has always been, for me, the quintessential jazz tune. Loves me some Monk!

    Am I the only one who finds the tri-tone not dissonant, but just richer?

    PS that Devil's interval crap was because unlike normal pitches, which prior to ET could be expressed as simple fractions, the DI never resolved. Much like pi and phi and other useful, but eely concepts.
    AFAIK the tritone was never actually considered the devils interval

    I might be talking out my arse, but the saying ‘mi contra fa diabolus est in musica’ is AFAIK a theoretical contravention in Guidonian hexachordal mutation esp in polyphony, which could be a tritone or a semitone depending on context IIRC (it’s complicated... ) although according to the Oxford Companion to Music it was simply because it was hard to sing... tbh this is specialist Early Music conehead shit and I don’t know for sure, but you have to watch out with those pesky hexachords.

    Anyway the other story, the wrong one, is WAY BETTER. I like the irrational number thing, stir a bit of Pythagoras into the mix. Why not?

    Right time to dig out the Sabbath again....

  10. #9

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    I like Peter Bernstein’s versions of Monk’s tunes


    He makes it work with the guitar

  11. #10

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    More thoughts:

    1) the rhythmic impulse and attack of Monk’s chords is really specific; these make even commonplace chords sound very out of kilter.
    2) there’s a lot of tenths
    3) there’s a lot of sixths
    4) there’s a lot of this three note voicing of a dominant, often descending in semitones
    3 4 3 x x x
    x 3 4 3 x x
    5) seconds, obviously
    6) chromatic inner voice melodies
    7) Peter Bernstein has this as a Monk chord (A13)
    5 x 5 x 7 x
    So incomplete voicings, right? Often doesn’t always include the third. Typically, he includes the seventh + another dissonance.
    8) Parallel fifths in the left hand too

    I like how much James P Johnson there is in Monk