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  1. #1

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    I just checked my email. I don't know who sends these things out, but I got 2 emails one right under the other.
    The 1st one said, "How to master pentatonic scales."
    The 2nd one said, "Why to avoid pentatonic scales."

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Sounds conclusive :-)

  4. #3

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    yes to both

    no to both

  5. #4

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    Or, how to master avoiding pentatonic scales... (a treatise for converted rock guitarists)

  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Karol
    I just checked my email. I don't know who sends these things out, but I got 2 emails one right under the other.
    The 1st one said, "How to master pentatonic scales."
    The 2nd one said, "Why to avoid pentatonic scales."

    there is nothing wrong with pentatonic scales, just add two extra notes to them, that will do the trick :-)

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gabor
    there is nothing wrong with pentatonic scales, just add two extra notes to them, that will do the trick :-)
    Ah, but which two notes? If you can't decide, just add all (the other) 7 ...
    Last edited by princeplanet; 07-21-2020 at 11:36 AM.

  8. #7

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    To (mis)quote Animal Farm:

    Seven notes good. Five notes baaaad.

  9. #8

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    At first glance, I thought this was going to be an instructional video on soloing over Wayne Shorter's Yes or No. Coincidentally, the tune opens with a G major pentatonic figure that is tweaked on its following statement to become a D major pentatonic.

  10. #9

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    Just saw another one:
    Pentatonic Scales - yes and no-capture-jpg

  11. #10

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    Pentatonic Scales: Threat or Menace?

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by unknownguitarplayer
    Pentatonic Scales: Threat or Menace?

    It's no coincidence that COVID has five letters.

    .

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by FwLineberry
    It's no coincidence that COVID has five letters.

    .
    Terrifying!

  14. #13

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    Apparently,

    It all boils down to just 3 small patterns that repeat all across the guitar neck, over and over again, in every direction.

    Just THREE!

    And those three little patterns are what allow us to hit all the right notes across the entire guitar neck…

    Who would have known?

  15. #14

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    Threat or menace?

    Obscure 60s reference; saw that joke headline in a circa 1968 Harvard Lampoon. Yesterday saw another obscure 60s reference on another site: Naked Came the Stranger. Mind is cluttered with 50 year old memories but can't remember where I parked the car.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by nopedals
    Threat or menace?

    Obscure 60s reference; saw that joke headline in a circa 1968 Harvard Lampoon. Yesterday saw another obscure 60s reference on another site: Naked Came the Stranger. Mind is cluttered with 50 year old memories but can't remember where I parked the car.
    I know where the car is....but I cant remember where the dame keys are...

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by nopedals
    Threat or menace?

    Obscure 60s reference; saw that joke headline in a circa 1968 Harvard Lampoon.
    Busted, but it was the National Lampoon in the early 70's.


  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Litterick

    Apparently,

    It all boils down to just 3 small patterns that repeat all across the guitar neck, over and over again, in every direction.

    Just THREE!

    And those three little patterns are what allow us to hit all the right notes across the entire guitar neck…

    Who would have known?
    You gotta love the internet...

    "You see, in music, there are only 7 different “sounds”...(We call these sounds “notes”)..."

    Both wrong, from the get go...

  19. #18

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    Here's still another one that takes somewhat of a different marketing approach:
    Pentatonic Scales - yes and no-capture-jpg

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by princeplanet
    Ah, but which two notes? If you can't decide, just add all (the other) 7 ...
    I meant, pentatonics are not too exciting, but by adding just two extra notes, it really can spice things up, and we jumped into the ezoteric world of Ionian or Aeolian :-)

  21. #20

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    Personally, I prefer pentagramic scales. When used by the light of a full moon and after certain rare herbs have been ingested, I find they have an almost magical quality...

  22. #21

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    Wikipedia says ...

    In 1968 the Harvard Lampoon published a parody of Life Magazine, which included a story called "Flying Saucers: Threat or Menace".
    In July 1971 the National Lampoon's cover story was "Pornography; Threat or Menace?"[7]

    Quote Originally Posted by unknownguitarplayer
    Busted, but it was the National Lampoon in the early 70's.


  23. #22

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    Pentatonic is ok for a starter before they learn the others. But it becomes limited in what you can do with it.

  24. #23

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    "In fact, after 22 years of playing and teaching professionally…"

    Well, I've been playing for 60 years, and I'm only just starting to get the hang of it!

    On the other hand, Julian Lage was born in 1987, when I'd already been playing for 27 years, and he seems to have figured most of it out already!

  25. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Karol
    Here's still another one that takes somewhat of a different marketing approach:
    Pentatonic Scales - yes and no-capture-jpg
    So the answer is on the next page?

  26. #25

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    Actually, pentatonic scales can add a lot more flavor than a seven note scale.If you're soloing over a Cmaj7 you can play a C pentatonic (ho-hum), or add some color with an Em pentatonic, or add another flavor with an Am pentatonic. These options are more exciting than a simple scale, pretty easy to get to, and offer more variety than adding the last two notes of the scale...

  27. #26

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    This taught me a lot about pentatonic scales


  28. #27

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    The A section is very much ‘yes’ and the B section is very much ‘no’

  29. #28

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    @Christian: great performance, Shorter’s always killing it, but, my, my, check the piano solo on that thing.

    His Holiness, John Scofield himself, is a master of the Pentatonic scale.
    Check out Chick Corea’s Now he sings album. It’s full of pentatonics.
    Of course John Coltrane, McCoy Tyner, Wayne Shorter and Herbie Hancock preceded all of those guys and there is little even the most hip cats can play, that hasn’t been done (better) by these giants.

    When ads for tutorials come up, I ask myself if Coltrane would have practiced it: (saved me money and time)
    • pentatonics, check
    • Bebop scales, check,
    • enclosures, check,
    • arpeggios, check,
    • 4-note patterns, check,
    • fourths, check,
    • alternate changes, check,
    • triad pairs, double check...

    That helps me escape all those ads for pretty useless “amazing new ways” of boosting your improvising. If Trane didn’t use it, why bother? You can substitute Hancock for Trane, or Scofield, Joe Henderson, Wayne Shorter, Kurt Rosenwinkel, if you would choose to.

  30. #29

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    I've got an amazing new method.

    Listen to records and use your ears and work out what people are doing.

    Oh hang on, that's an amazing old method.