1. #1

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    I have a composition which I may need to dicsuss with some local conservatory musicians and, being self-taught, I have a few doubts about chord nomenclature etc.

    After a couple of measures of an arpeggiated figure (Bbmaj7), it kicks off in the key of F. This chord (585585) I understand is F9 (*). Now, the next one Bb6sus2 (right?-6X556X) is followed by the same shape one step down (4X334X), which would be "correctly" called Ab6sus2 (as against G#), right?

    A bit further ahead, you could call it the chorus, it's going from Cm7(9) to Am7(9) - does this kind of minor 3rd "drop" have a specific name? Imagine I'm talking to a pianist, for example.

    There is a whole-tone descending melodic movement over F9/Bb6sus2/Ab6sus2, then some chromaticism on the way back up. Is there a "better" way to describe this?

    In the next section over a Fsus2/Bb6 vamp, I'm playing a repeated F-D-C figure (ostinato?) at counterrhythm. Yes?

    In the last section, which has a swing feel, I'm going for a kind of "deconstruction" with the dissonant Fmaj7b5 at the end of the progression. Would you call this part a coda?

    If you care to listen to the piece in question, it's in the composition forum: Even Though.

    I make this stuff up, but have limited ability to talk about it. Thank you for your patience.

    Cheers

    * Not
    Last edited by Peter C; 06-25-2020 at 08:09 PM.

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  3. #2

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    I think the chord names are fine. I'm not so sure it is necessary to talk about the series of changes by their special names. If the conservatory musicians would recognize those special names, then they would recognize the corresponding chord change series.

    I imagine that what the conservatory musicians may be more interested in knowing or discussing might be how to mark up the score - the various Italian words and the various marks and symbols that appear throughout a score that indicate the composer's intent for feel and mood, dynamics, and other expressive and interpretive elements. If you can talk through your vision of how it sounds - "this part gets louder for a moment", "these notes here are short and separated", "this part has a sweeter sound", etc. they can suggest what any musician reading a score would expect to see on the page in order to do that...

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter C
    I have a composition which I may need to dicsuss with some local conservatory musicians and, being self-taught, I have a few doubts about chord nomenclature etc.

    After a couple of measures of an arpeggiated figure (Bbmaj7), it kicks off in the key of F. This chord (585585) I understand is F9. Now, the next one Bb6sus2 (right?-6X556X) is followed by the same shape one step down (4X334X), which would be "correctly" called Ab6sus2 (as against G#), right?

    A bit further ahead, you could call it the chorus, it's going from Cm7(9) to Am7(9) - does this kind of minor 3rd "drop" have a specific name? Imagine I'm talking to a pianist, for example.

    There is a whole-tone descending melodic movement over F9/Bb6sus2/Ab6sus2, then some chromaticism on the way back up. Is there a "better" way to describe this?

    In the next section over a Fsus2/Bb6 vamp, I'm playing a repeated F-D-C figure (ostinato?) at counterrhythm. Yes?

    In the last section, which has a swing feel, I'm going for a kind of "deconstruction" with the dissonant Fmaj7b5 at the end of the progression. Would you call this part a coda?

    If you care to listen to the piece in question, it's in the composition forum: Even Though.

    I make this stuff up, but have limited ability to talk about it. Thank you for your patience.

    Cheers
    F9 needs an Eb. That grip you posted is A F G C G A. Fadd9?

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar
    F9 needs an Eb. That grip you posted is A F G C G A. Fadd9?
    Gads, you're right, of course: Fadd9/A

    Names are important!