1. #1

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    I would like to know. Unfortunately can't find in my copy of Mdecks books 1, 2 or 3.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Herbie Hancock does not play chords on the track. It's "time without changes". I have analyzed Herbie's solo and he uses 4 scale types and melodic sequencing. I tried to start another thread on the Improv board to explain, but nobody seemed interested.
    Casino Coupe with "Antiquity" P90s. Telecaster with S.D. Vintage Stack pickups. Stratocaster with 3 "Little 59s" pickups. Monoprice 5 watt with GG 12AY7 tube and Gold Lion 6V6, and Weber alnico speaker. Fender Rumble 40 with Eminence Baslite speaker.

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by rintincop View Post
    Herbie Hancock does not play chords on the track. It's "time without changes". I have analyzed Herbie's solo and he uses 4 scale types and melodic sequencing. I tried to start another thread on the Improv board to explain, but nobody seemed interested.
    My copy has chords on it C7, A7b9, Eb-7, G-m7b5 etc. Where's this other thread of yours please? and thanks for your reply!

  5. #4

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    You can ignore those chords. The tune was not intended to have chords or tonality; it only requires time. I have not uploaded my transcription of Hancock’s solo with my analysis yet. I will say he weaves lines almost exclusively from the melodic minor scale, the major scale, the whole tone scale, the chromatic scale and the diminished scale. He plays shapes. He’s either sequencing patterns, mostly built from seconds or thirds. Or, he’s creating non-pattern based melodic phrases by ear. He perhaps seems to be unconsciously biased towards F position on the piano, often a pianist’s favorite range.

  6. #5

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    I think I read an interview once where Herbie Hancock said on those tunes he would sometimes just let his fingers play ‘automatically’, i.e. just fire off any patterns or sequences that came out, without really thinking about it. He did have other approaches too, but I can’t remember what else he said now.

  7. #6

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    It's Wayne... don't look for logic :-)

  8. #7

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    I would not look in the chart here ....
    I think in that case it makes sense only to listen and hear... and build up from it... if you do not hear realtions by ear you will not play convincingly


    (it concerns any music actually... it is just that in traditional stuff we take too many thing for granted)

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop View Post
    I think I read an interview once where Herbie Hancock said on those tunes he would sometimes just let his fingers play ‘automatically’, i.e. just fire off any patterns or sequences that came out, without really thinking about it. He did have other approaches too, but I can’t remember what else he said now.
    Be cool to see that if you can dig it out.

    John Scofield said something similar about his tune Protocol ‘weird blues’

  10. #9

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    Unfortunately it was a long time ago, I don’t know where I read it.

    But there are a couple of interesting points in Herbie’s biography. He says he stopped playing 3rds and 7ths in his lines after Miles said ‘don’t play the butter notes’. (Although later someone told him Miles said ‘bottom notes’!) He reckoned this forced him to play differently.

    Then Miles told him to stop using his left hand. So this made his lines even more random or open sounding, as there was no chordal reference coming from his left hand.