Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 32 of 32
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    Hi everybody,

    i would like to know how many type of chord i can use to end a minor tune.

    For example if i play a tune in C minor, can i use a tritone chord with the major seventh and sharp eleventh(F#maj7#11)? Pat Metheny use this alternative sometimes..

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    I'd need to hear an example of that.

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Fra88
    Hi everybody,

    i would like to know how many type of chord i can use to end a minor tune.

    For example if i play a tune in C minor, can i use a tritone chord with the major seventh and sharp eleventh(F#maj7#11)? Pat Metheny use this alternative sometimes..
    Youtube link?

    Lately, I've been watching videos on Bill Evans, and I'm starting to think guitarists are too conservative in their chord choices.


  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Mi6 sounds good in a lot of situations, but not all.

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Yeah I'd say min 6 or minmaj7...maybe throw in a 9th

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    X04554 is cool, I learned that in some gypsy jazz thing

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    minor add 2 is a nice, simple chord, if you don't want fancy.

    A minor add 2: x02415

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    The James Bond chord: min/maj9

    In E: 0 10 9 8 7 0


    Although, I like the unexpected ending of a major flavored chord...very baroque or something. Probably got my period wrong...

  10. #9

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles

    A minor add 2: x02415
    I can't play that!

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Yes, I saw this earlier and was going to say all those. But you did say Cm.

    There's Cm/M9.

    81098810

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    I can't play that!
    Why not? Religious objections, union rules?

    .
    .
    .
    .

    I keed, I keed! You could drop the treble A. If you want an A on top:

    A minor (add 2): x09555

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    Why not? Religious objections, union rules?
    I can do it if I try really hard but it's not an easy grab. And it hurts! Slightly easier on the 4th/5th fret in Cm but even so.

    Wouldn't bother, personally, I'd do something else. Sorry!

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles

    A minor (add 2): x09555
    In movable form:

    A minor (add 2): 579555

    Major version (more challenging)

    A Major (add 2): 579655

  15. #14

    User Info Menu

    Min6 maj7. xx7887 Instant noir jazz. The James Bond chord would work too. All are my favs.

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    In movable form:

    A minor (add 2): 579555
    May as well play x05500. Just as good. No strain.

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by ragman1
    May as well play x05500. Just as good. No strain.
    True, if you ignore the most important word in my post.

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    .
    .
    .

    I keed, I keed! You could drop the treble A. If you want an A on top:

    A minor (add 2): x09555
    Well now, c'mon, you gotta add a low F# on that and ditch the open A

    Johnny Smith chords...gotta love em.

  19. #18

    User Info Menu

    8x88 10 10
    thumb over

  20. #19

    User Info Menu

    I seem to remember from music school the "Picardy Third" named after Captain Picard of the Starship Enterprise.

    The first ten seconds of this video has great example with explanation following:


  21. #20

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Onlyserious
    I seem to remember from music school the "Picardy Third" named after Captain Picard of the Starship Enterprise.

    The first ten seconds of this video has great example with explanation following:

    Any well known examples of jazz tunes that end on a Picardy Third?

  22. #21

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    Any well known examples of jazz tunes that end on a Picardy Third?

    Great question!!! I can't think of any off the top of my head. So let me think.


    Hmmm. Jazz is very bluesy, so ending on a somewhat sad and minor sound seems..... apropos.


    But OTOH - jazz was spawned in various New Orleans brothels so......... a, er, "happy ending" would also seem apropos.

  23. #22

    User Info Menu

    OK, since I brought the Picardy skunk to the garden party, I'll admit I can't think of a jazz example.

    The most obvious, well known tune that occurs to me is the ending of Classical Gas.

    I have stuck a Picardy third on to end Stolen Moments, but you wouldn't have heard it...

  24. #23

    User Info Menu

    Bach used a Picardy third pretty frequently; you're not gonna get better validation than that!

  25. #24

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by whiskey02
    Bach used a Picardy third pretty frequently; you're not gonna get better validation than that!
    Now we are getting somewhere!


  26. #25

    User Info Menu

    What is this thing called love?

    Although it‘s not really minor, it changes all the time.


    Gesendet von iPad mit Tapatalk

  27. #26

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by docsteve
    What is this thing called love?

    Although it‘s not really minor, it changes all the time.
    I'd call that close, but no ceegar. What is this thing called love? alternates 251's in Fm and Cmaj.

  28. #27

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Fra88
    Hi everybody,

    i would like to know how many type of chord i can use to end a minor tune.

    For example if i play a tune in C minor, can i use a tritone chord with the major seventh and sharp eleventh(F#maj7#11)? Pat Metheny use this alternative sometimes..
    Django did this at times even when working in major keys (e.g. in C major he might use some form of F#major as an end chord). Certainly wakes the listener up.

    Re Picardy...I have heard Monk's tune "Round Midsection" use a Picardy third at the end of the A part and in some versions they end on it. A noir-ish tune with these bright endings...

  29. #28

    User Info Menu

    Or just play Cm, of course

  30. #29

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    Youtube link?

    Lately, I've been watching videos on Bill Evans, and I'm starting to think guitarists are too conservative in their chord choices.

    nice ending chord on Blue in Green...Dmi6/9

    D F B E ( G13/D) 5 3 4 5

  31. #30

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by BigDaddyLoveHandles
    Why not? Religious objections, union rules?

    .
    .
    .
    .

    I keed, I keed! You could drop the treble A. If you want an A on top:

    A minor (add 2): x09555
    Easier to play that chord as x02505

  32. #31

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by Fra88
    Hi everybody,

    i would like to know how many type of chord i can use to end a minor tune.

    For example if i play a tune in C minor, can i use a tritone chord with the major seventh and sharp eleventh(F#maj7#11)? Pat Metheny use this alternative sometimes..
    I wrote a tune a bit like that, C minor blues with an F#maj7#11 chord in bar 11... Works like this (last 4)]

    Normally
    | Ab7 | G7 | Cm | % |

    And I have
    | Ab7#11 | G7b9sus4 | F#maj7#11 | F7#11 |

    If I knew it was a Metheny thing I wouldn't have done it lol. But seriously I wrote it to have a bit of a Brecker Tales of the Hudson vibe, so maybe that's why.

    Anyway, it'll be on my forthcoming record....

    So... my pathetically obvious ending chord of choice in minor is the last one in that example - the IV7#11. Last refuge of the scoundrel. Always works though...

  33. #32

    User Info Menu

    Beyond that, you can do anything so long as it works with the melody note. Most standards melodies end on the tonic (I), so you can use any of these:

    I6
    Im6
    bVImaj7
    bVI7(#11)
    bIImaj7
    bIIm(maj7)
    IV7(#11)
    and so on....

    #IVmaj7#11 will also work...
    melody note = C
    F#maj7#11 = F# A# C# E# (G#) B# (or C in English!)

    Imaj7 or Im(maj7) is considered a poor choice in traditional arranging because of the clash between seventh and tonic. However, many modern players ignore this restriction, embracing the clash. Jonathon Kreisberg for instance.