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  1. #1

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    I'm looking for a book that helps me to learn triads in different keys across string sets. I asked this question in another forum and was recommended to Chord Chemistry, Vic Jurus Modern Chords, The George Van Eps method, and Chord Connections. I'm sure they're all great books but I was looking through samples of the Chord Chemistry book (granted they're samples out of context) but I'm not sure I get at all what he is getting at in a way that's accessible to me. I could be wrong and am willing to put in the work whatever book I get but I want to make sure I get the best book relevant to my needs.

    What are your thoughts, recommendations?

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    "As for me, all I know is that I know nothing." - Socrates
    “Man suffers only because he takes seriously what the gods made for fun.” - Alan Wilson Watts

  4. #3

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    eBook: The George Van Eps Method for Guitar - DjangoBooks.com

    it's about 40 pages, almost all of which do just that...Rob MacKillop's posted videos of lots of the exercises on his site if you want to see / hear 'em first...Chord Chemistry's a different thing, I'm not familiar with the other books you mention..

  5. #4

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    Two books that I think would help you out are Advanced Concepts For Rhythm Guitar by Steven Crowell and The Comping Expo by Robert Conti.

    The Steven Crowell publication is a book/CD while the Robert Conti publication is a book/DVD.

    Excellent, well laid out material in both.

    Regards,
    Steven Herron

    The Comping Expo - Robert Conti

    Advanced Concepts For Rhythm Guitar - Steven Crowell

  6. #5

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    Randy Vincent “three note voicings and beyond” has a great triad review. Major, minor, augmented,diminished in open and closed , on different string sets in all major and minor keys. You have to work them out and do all the work yourself though, and need to really know the fretboard. It is a very long workout to do what I described. Sets the stage for tons of cool stuff though.
    For Ted Greene I would say Modern Chord Progressions is a better start than Chord Chemistry. Both are amazing. The Modern Chord Progressions book gives examples of scale harmonizations in Triads. Again you have to do the work. Chord Chemistry has scale harmonies but it’s more of a list than a method.
    Jordan Klemmons has a triad bootcamp online. Gives the foundation for all the cool sounds he teaches based on triads. Jordan is on this board and he is a great player and teacher.
    For me , I think people should play a keyboard for at least a small percent of practice time. I mean just by working out the simple triad inversions in the most basic children’s songs a person would already have more musicianship than someone playing tab of popular tunes on guitar.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  7. #6
    Hey, Thanks everyone. I forgot to click to get notices of posts. I'll spend some time exploring what you've provided and see where that takes me. I've been drawn to Klemons and Conti before but wasn't quite sure what I'd be getting into. Ill check it all out though and might have Q's. Appreciate your help. Dan

  8. #7

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    So generally you'll get more out of putting the voicings together yourself. I mean your talking about triads, right. So there are only three notes...so there are only 6 inversions and then depending on your skills... only so many mechanical voicings, along with octave transposition.... and doublings

    1 3 5
    1 5 3
    3 5 1
    3 1 5
    5 1 3
    5 3 1

    Then start making voicings and run the sequence

    Then start looking at books

  9. #8

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    'Chord Connections' by Robert Brown goes through exactly what you're asking for with diagrams and standard notation. That book also goes on to 7th chords and extended/altered chords in the same manner. A very good book for what you're trying to do.

    The Van Eps book is standard notation only. If you're looking for diagrams, you won't find them in that book.

    Neither of the Ted Greene books that have been mentioned really address what you're asking for. The information is in there, but that is not what those books are trying to teach.

    Mick Goodrick does cover this in 'The Advancing Guitarist', but again no diagrams and you have to work them all out for yourself.

    .
    The disgusting stink of a too-loud electric guitar; now that's my idea of a good time - Frank Zappa

  10. #9

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    Jody Fisher's Beginning Jazz Guitar (Alfred, 1995) includes three diagrams:

    Root position triad fingerings
    First inversion triads on four strings
    Second inversion triads on the four string sets.

  11. #10

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    Reg has it..learn the basic triads first..

    my take

    learn them on each set of strings..there are only three chords to learn that way-root & two inversions

    so on string set 6 5 4 for the C major chord would be (C E G)

    frets......note......Interval
    3 3 2.... G C E......5 1 3
    8 7 5.....C E G......1 3 5
    12.10.10 E G C.....3 5 1

    then the next set of strings - 5 4 3 and so on ..

    this kind of thing that Ted Greene uses and well as many others.."systematic inversions" on each set of strings

    135
    351
    513

    its also an aid in learning the notes all over the fretboard

    and of course learn this stuff in all keys
    play well ...
    wolf

  12. #11

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    I'd start with close voiced triads across consecutive string sets. My take on them is to connect each form via overlapping inversions through a cycle of 4ths and that requires taking them down in the direction of the nut rather than up towards the bridge. The last time I posted these here, I received a lot of positive feedback so I hope they're of some use.

    Recommend Books on Chords?-major-triads-jpgRecommend Books on Chords?-minor-triads-jpgRecommend Books on Chords?-diminished-triads-jpgRecommend Books on Chords?-augmented-triads-jpg

  13. #12

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    I love books and could recommend my favorites but I'm with Reg on this one, first figure stuff out on your own.

    Some simple starter methods of generating endless chord data:

    1. Voicings and inversions

    Triads:

    1 3 5
    3 5 1
    5 1 3

    1 5 3
    3 1 5
    5 3 1

    and various doublings

    apply to major/minor/diminished/augmented
    I also include suspended chords - 1 4 5 and major b5 - 1 3 b5

    Sevenths:

    2 most common guitar voicings:

    1 5 7 3
    3 7 1 5
    5 1 3 7
    7 3 5 1

    1 7 3 5
    3 1 5 7
    5 3 7 1
    7 5 1 3

    less common but worth some attention in my opinion are the inversions of the following:

    1 5 3 7 // 1 3 7 5 // 1 7 5 3 // 1 3 5 7

    Apply these voicings to these chord qualities:

    ma7 // 7th // ma7+ // 7+ // ma7b5 // 7b5 // mMa7 // m7 // oMa7 // m7b5 // o7 // ma7sus // 7sus //

    2. Interval Scales // Triad Scales // 7th Scales

    Apply these to the following scales:

    major // melodic minor // harmonic minor // harmonic major

    later on; diminished // whole tone // various pentatonics and hexatonics

    3. Small movement voice leading - maintain common tones or move to the closest available chord tone

    start with chord pairs in the same voicing family

    Ex. Cma7 & Gm7

    C G B E > D G Bb F
    E B C G > F Bb D G
    G C E B > G D F Bb
    B E G C > Bb F G D

    4. Analyze song progressions and how each chord relates to the melody

    All the above are mechanical procedures and are not to be confused with music.
    It is far easier for me to write this out than it is to learn.
    Don't forget to get out and see the sun, listen to great players (live when possible), play with people.
    Don't be scared to experiment and see what happens when this combines with that.

    Extended harmony for another day.

  14. #13

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    I'm not sure of the level of the question.

    If it's simply a case of finding them on the neck, I'd recommend this approach.

    1. Learn the notes on the fretboard, every string, every fret. Get that automatic. One great way to do this is to learn to read. But, you can figure this out by yourself easily enough if you just know the notes of the chromatic scale.

    2. Then, write out the triads you want and make your own diagrams. Circle the root.

    But, my impression is that it's easier to learn by playing music than by just working out locations. For someone that can read, you may be able to find arrangements of tunes in triads. I don't know the best way for a non reader.

  15. #14

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    I would agree with FwLineberry that "Chord connections" by Robert Brown is what you are looking for.

    There are also two online courses that I am aware of.

    1.Peghead Nation's GUITAR CHORD THEORY with Mark Goldenberg Guitar Chord Theory Lessons - Beginner Music Theory for Guitar | Peghead Nation

    2. Truefire's Chord Navigator: CAGED Triads by Rob Garland Chord Navigator: CAGED Triads - Guitar Lessons - TrueFire

    They are both excellent but I must confess I liked the aforementioned book the best
    Last edited by ksaric; 03-29-2019 at 05:37 AM.

  16. #15

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  17. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Reg View Post
    So generally you'll get more out of putting the voicings together yourself. I mean your talking about triads, right. So there are only three notes...so there are only 6 inversions and then depending on your skills... only so many mechanical voicings, along with octave transposition.... and doublings

    1 3 5
    1 5 3
    3 5 1
    3 1 5
    5 1 3
    5 3 1

    Then start making voicings and run the sequence

    Then start looking at books
    Thanks! So far (while exploring books) I put together the root, first and second inversions of the keys of C and F Major on the first and second string sets. When i started it was in relation to learning them in relation to a song.

    What do you mean by run the sequence?

  18. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by bako View Post
    I love books and could recommend my favorites but I'm with Reg on this one, first figure stuff out on your own.

    Some simple starter methods of generating endless chord data:

    1. Voicings and inversions

    Triads:

    1 3 5
    3 5 1
    5 1 3

    1 5 3
    3 1 5
    5 3 1

    and various doublings

    apply to major/minor/diminished/augmented
    I also include suspended chords - 1 4 5 and major b5 - 1 3 b5

    Sevenths:

    2 most common guitar voicings:

    1 5 7 3
    3 7 1 5
    5 1 3 7
    7 3 5 1

    1 7 3 5
    3 1 5 7
    5 3 7 1
    7 5 1 3

    less common but worth some attention in my opinion are the inversions of the following:

    1 5 3 7 // 1 3 7 5 // 1 7 5 3 // 1 3 5 7

    Apply these voicings to these chord qualities:

    ma7 // 7th // ma7+ // 7+ // ma7b5 // 7b5 // mMa7 // m7 // oMa7 // m7b5 // o7 // ma7sus // 7sus //

    2. Interval Scales // Triad Scales // 7th Scales

    Apply these to the following scales:

    major // melodic minor // harmonic minor // harmonic major

    later on; diminished // whole tone // various pentatonics and hexatonics

    3. Small movement voice leading - maintain common tones or move to the closest available chord tone

    start with chord pairs in the same voicing family

    Ex. Cma7 & Gm7

    C G B E > D G Bb F
    E B C G > F Bb D G
    G C E B > G D F Bb
    B E G C > Bb F G D

    4. Analyze song progressions and how each chord relates to the melody

    All the above are mechanical procedures and are not to be confused with music.
    It is far easier for me to write this out than it is to learn.
    Don't forget to get out and see the sun, listen to great players (live when possible), play with people.
    Don't be scared to experiment and see what happens when this combines with that.

    Extended harmony for another day.


    I'll save this list to keep me busy. Thanks

  19. #18


    I did download the first one but haven't looked at it yet.

  20. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by rpjazzguitar View Post
    I'm not sure of the level of the question.

    If it's simply a case of finding them on the neck, I'd recommend this approach.

    1. Learn the notes on the fretboard, every string, every fret. Get that automatic. One great way to do this is to learn to read. But, you can figure this out by yourself easily enough if you just know the notes of the chromatic scale.

    2. Then, write out the triads you want and make your own diagrams. Circle the root.

    But, my impression is that it's easier to learn by playing music than by just working out locations. For someone that can read, you may be able to find arrangements of tunes in triads. I don't know the best way for a non reader.

    I can read a little and am guessing it would be good practice to apply this to identifying triads and placing them on the neck.

  21. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by ksaric View Post
    I would agree with FwLineberry that "Chord connections" by Robert Brown is what you are looking for.

    There are also two online courses that I am aware of.

    1.Peghead Nation's GUITAR CHORD THEORY with Mark Goldenberg Guitar Chord Theory Lessons - Beginner Music Theory for Guitar | Peghead Nation

    2. Truefire's Chord Navigator: CAGED Triads by Rob Garland Chord Navigator: CAGED Triads - Guitar Lessons - TrueFire

    They are both excellent but I must confess I liked the aforementioned book the best

    I did Rob's Chord Navigator while I was taking lessons from him a couple of years ago. Have not applied the approach in a long time. probably wouldn't take much to get it back.

  22. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by PMB View Post
    I'd start with close voiced triads across consecutive string sets. My take on them is to connect each form via overlapping inversions through a cycle of 4ths and that requires taking them down in the direction of the nut rather than up towards the bridge. The last time I posted these here, I received a lot of positive feedback so I hope they're of some use.

    Recommend Books on Chords?-major-triads-jpgRecommend Books on Chords?-minor-triads-jpgRecommend Books on Chords?-diminished-triads-jpgRecommend Books on Chords?-augmented-triads-jpg

    I like these, thank you. I like them because they have tab and regular notation.

  23. #22
    Thank you all for taking the time to respond. I wasn't really wanting a book that would do all the work for me especially with the basic triads but I do like to get resource materials to look at and learn from simultaneously.

  24. #23

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    Lots of great information here.
    Nevertheless I'll add my two cents: I can highly recommend Tim Miller's online lessons. By far the best lessons on fretboard knowledge and triads I have found. Warm-up exercises with triads, close-voiced and spread triads, improvising with triads and triad pairs AND you can interact with Tim.

  25. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Gearhead View Post
    Lots of great information here.
    Nevertheless I'll add my two cents: I can highly recommend Tim Miller's online lessons. By far the best lessons on fretboard knowledge and triads I have found. Warm-up exercises with triads, close-voiced and spread triads, improvising with triads and triad pairs AND you can interact with Tim.
    \

    what's your experience with his teaching? what kind of jazz player is he? Is the material he posts linear in terms of learning.

  26. #25

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    Triads across and along the fretboard?

    William Leavitt, Volume 2


    For open voicings and "melodization" (lead lines on top of voicings) look to Volume 3.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzstdnt View Post
    Triads across and along the fretboard?

    William Leavitt, Volume 2

    For open voicings and "melodization" (lead lines on top of voicings) look to Volume 3.
    Yes - Volumes 1, 2, 3. Use the Table of Contents, and jump around to the pages where TRIADS are taught.

    The fastest way I know of learning triads all over the neck, all four types, is Chris Buono's "Guitar Gym" at Truefire.com: https://truefire.com/search/?q=Guita...m%20-%20triads

    Really, this is great, imo. He has you hybrid pick, or strum, or fingerpick the triads, on all string sets, and up and back down the fingerboard. Buono may not direct you to do this, but using the "Play it & Say it" technique helps cement the triad names into memory. Make up games, etc., to drill the names/positions into yer brain. /// Actually, all of the Guitar Gym modules are awesome, I think.

  28. #27

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    He has a book the very comprehensive.But very pragmatic and clear.Some of the charts here remind me of it.So if you want it in print check him out.

  29. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by EarlBrother View Post
    He has a book the very comprehensive.But very pragmatic and clear.Some of the charts here remind me of it.So if you want it in print check him out.
    Who are you referring to?

  30. #29

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    David Deloach masterguitarist.com also on facebook but i rarely use FB

  31. #30

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    Quote Originally Posted by vashondan View Post
    \

    what's your experience with his teaching? what kind of jazz player is he? Is the material he posts linear in terms of learning.
    Tim is very helpful and very specific in his answers. He is a modern jazz/fusion player with an impeccable technique.
    The site is not very linear, there are courses (between 6 and 12 lessons) on different topics. These courses are linear but everything else is pretty much up to the user. Tim can point you in the right direction though.