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  1. #1

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    Hey guys I'm working on Revelation by the Yellowjackets and I am definitely a key center approach guy and I hear the III7 chord in the key of the tune in this case G. I'm exploring notes that sound good and it does not really consist of a scale I recognize... any input would be great. Really just chord tones sound good and G A B C D# D F#

    Progression
    |G7 | |C7 |B13sus B13 |
    |C7 |D7 |G | |

    Thanks a bunch

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    I always think that move III7 IV is super churchy

    Other songs that have it - sunny side of the street, just a closer walk with thee, someday my prince will come....

    It’s an interrupted cadence in relative minor?

    Interrupted cadences are kind of super churchy

  4. #3

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    F# melodic minor. It's got the G# in it.
    Last edited by ragman1; 01-16-2020 at 10:26 AM.

  5. #4

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    Soloing wise try these ideas

    Play what you would normally but raise 5 to #5.... that gives you E harmonic minor (D to D#)

    Alternatively, lower the 6 to b6. This gives you B altered, or C melodic minor.

  6. #5

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    Also .... it’s the Barry Harris maj-6 dim lol

  7. #6

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    The III7 is not uncommon, especially at the start of a bridge. It starts the Sears & Roebuck bridge, one of the most common progressions around. Right behind it is the Montgomery Ward bridge. So common they gave them common names, for ease of explanation on a bandstand. As in "It's Honeysuckle Rose with a Sears Roebuck bridge".

  8. #7

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    I think those bridge names are a bit dumb to use in 2018 whatever the history because no one gets the references now.

    Maybe we could have an Amazon bridge and an EBay bridge or something.

    Tbh I get the old names confused, I just say rhythm bridge or honeysuckle bridge. Does the same job and is clear. Unless the musician in question doesn’t know either of those tunes in which case it’s ok to fire them.

  9. #8

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    Well, I grew up in a different place and time than you did. But we're still playing tunes that are older than either of us, many 100 years or more old. So what's wrong with using old terminology? In any case, use whatever gets the message across. I doubt many younger musicians these days would know about that terminology anyway, especially if I were to use the vernacular of the day, "Monkey Ward". Old folks from here would know it, but it's not the latest and hippest.

  10. #9

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    There’s a guy in London called Pete Churchill who teaches that stuff

  11. #10

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    Is he related to Sir Winston? Which stuff? Old vernacular?

  12. #11

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    No (afaik) and yes

  13. #12

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    Nice work if you can get it, I guess. Perhaps I should try that. But there is no call for it here, AFAIK, and I can't move to London. In any case, the position appears to be already taken there. There can't be a need for more than one.

  14. #13

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    Pete teaches literally all the jazz students in London.

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Pete teaches literally all the jazz students in London.
    Both of them.

    Bada-boom ...

    I'll be here all week, folks!

  16. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Soloing wise try these ideas

    Play what you would normally but raise 5 to #5.... that gives you E harmonic minor (D to D#)
    Thanks guys for all the great insight... Christian this is one that works well for me! I'm trying to get into a little tougher tunes... and this III7 is a new change to add to the arsenal.

    Here is what my band sounds like if you want to check it out...

  17. #16

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    Yeah I think in that context, going to IV, the harmonic minor is the most obvious sound. It’s all about the D# going a half step up to E in the next chord... Kind of a line cliche

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Yeah I think in that context, going to IV, the harmonic minor is the most obvious sound. It’s all about the D# going a half step up to E in the next chord... Kind of a line cliche
    Quite, obvious.

  19. #18

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    Or you can just keep playing C over E7 because you get the b9 and #9. It's a lot easier than trying to dutifully negotiate the III7 sound. The background can cover it. I've always thought we could let the background harmony do more of the work.

    And it doesn't need to sound like Freight Train

    Last edited by ragman1; 01-18-2020 at 08:09 PM.

  20. #19

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    progression I III7 IV is one of my favorites. She is found in On the Sunny Side of the Street, Someday my Prince Will come, The Dock of the Bay...
    I always loved that sound... I associated it with gospel/spirituel music style... and it seems to have that stylistic referece often (liek in Georgia on My Mind)...
    I also like I - III7 - IV... progression...

    I'll Be Seeing You - opening bars are interesting too...

    By the way I find very interesting progression in Lennon's Imagine refrain

    IV - V - I - III7 and repeat -- typically one would expect here VI, or VI7, I7... and it is interesting that it connects very smoothly .. I think it is based more on voice leading here than functional realtion.

  21. #20

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    Wow. Had to wipe back a tear. I played blues with a buddy for 25 years. He died two years ago this February. We played Elizabeth Cotten's "Freight Train" at every show. Great song.