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  1. #51

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    Rob,
    I'll dig through my collection and pull out a few more of these recordings. I'll have to convert them to mp3 before I can post them. I think that the intent of the method book becomes more clear after hearing GVE play this style with a plectrum.

    Growing up in a musical family, with classical/ragtime banjoist father Fred, pianists such as his mother, brother Robert and George Gershwin, as well as a brother who was an arranger, no doubt gave GVE a thorough understanding of harmony. He used that knowledge, coupled with his prodigious technique, to superimpose simple triads over the chords of a song to acheive extensions and tensions.

    A friend of mine, who is a fine player and excellent arranger for guitar, once remarked that Van Eps' music was "simple in concept but complex in execution". Which sums it up nicely, I think.
    Regards,
    Jerome

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #52

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    That would be great, Monk. Much appreciated!

    I've just to the end of my read through the Method - that Etude on the last page is an odd one. Looking forward to polishing it up a little, get some shape into my reading of it. Not sure what to make of the d in bar 10. The first d is # with a 2 next to it. Then the same note has a 4, yet nothing seems to have changed, and the 4 doesn't make sense. So I've decided to ignore the 4. If anyone knows otherwise, please let me know.

  4. #53

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    Here is another clip of George Van Eps from 1949 playing Once In A While. Van Eps plectrum playing features triads, four note chords and chord-supported single note runs seamlessly integrated into a mind-boggling display of guitar playing that is always musical.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  5. #54

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    For me, chord melody is the melody of a song harmonized or supported by chords. I consider a chord solo to be an extemporized statement that follows the structure of a song in the same way that most jazz guitarists play single note solos.

    To say that George Van Eps was adept at both is an epic understatement. Here is GVE from 1956 playing I Never Knew. Here Van Eps demonstrates all the hallmarks of his plectrum style that I mentioned in my previous post to present the melody of the tune followed by a great solo.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  6. #55

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    Guitar players didn't get a lot of air time in the 1930s. Most were relegated to the rhythm chair of an orchestra and seldom got to strut their stuff. If you were learning to play guitar in the 30s you had to wade through a lot of band recording to catch 4, 8, or 16 bars of solo guitar playing of your favorite player. In Van Eps' case it was always worth it. Like most of the top flight players of the time, GVE held a regular band gig and did lots of radio and session work.
    The clip here, from 1934, features GVE with Adrian Rollini playing Gershwin's Somebody Loves Me. A "sweet band" recording, George gets a short solo where he plays off the melody while still getting in a few interesting ideas. There is a playfulness here that emphasizes the "play" in guitar playing.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  7. #56

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    The Chant is a private recording made in the early 1930s in Van Eps' Long Island home. This was recorded at the same time as a duet by Van Eps and bassist Bob Haggart for their amusement and was never intended for release. This tune began showing up on anthologies in the mid-70s incorectly attributed to Dick McDonough and titled Chasin' A Buck. The duet I mentioned appears on anthologies as The Dick Bernstein Ramble, incorrectly atributed to to Dick McDonough and Atrie Bernstein.

    A very interesting minor key tune, The Chant, again features Van Eps weaving triads and four string chords into a breath-taking two minutes of unaccompanied guitar playing. For those who have the George Van Eps Guitar Solos book, you will recognize the snippet of A Study in 8ths that he plays early in the tune.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  8. #57

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    Monk, these are all wonderful Great to hear him play with a pick, but do you know when he made the switch to fingerstyle?

  9. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Monk, these are all wonderful Great to hear him play with a pick, but do you know when he made the switch to fingerstyle?
    Rob,
    According to interviews I've read, Van Eps began to study classical guitar pieces in the late Thirties or early Forties. He had a classic guitar that he played at home. Most of his professional work involved acoustic rhythm guitar with a plectrum and he usually soloed on acoustic guitar with a pick for reasons of volume.

    Van Eps was fascinated by the way pianists could play moving harmonic sequences against melodies or sustained notes. He loved counterpoint and moving chordal lines. He considered his two methods of playing as separate and distinct in the right hand. He called his plectrum playing "banjo style" and referred to his fingerstyle playing as "lap piano".

    At some point in the mid to late Forties he built a pickup for his Epiphone Deluxe. After that, he continued to play rhythm with a pick but occasionally took advantage of the pickup's increased volume to play a fingerstyle solo. After Gretsch produced the GVE seven string around 1967, he played fingerstyle electric guitar exclusively on recordings.

    I posted a video here and on the Ted Greene forum in March 2013 of a TV program from mid-1950s with GVE playing Do You Know What It means to Miss New Orleans? There is a brief clear shot of Van Eps playing rhythm and another of him soloing. It's worth searching for. At 9:46, he's playing rhythm; at 10:40, he solos. Short but informative clips. Especially if one has worked with The GVE Guitar Method.
    Best Regards,
    Jerome
    Last edited by monk; 12-19-2013 at 04:12 AM.

  10. #59

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    Jerome (thanks for your real name - I wish more people would use their real name - but that's an aside...) I have seen that video you refer to, and you can certainly hear the Method at work in his short but unique solo. There really was no one I know of doing anything remotely similar on the guitar at that time.

    It doesn't surprise me he calls his pick playing "banjo style" as the plectrum and tenor banjos were all the rage in the 20s and 30s - three or four-note chords leaping around the fretboard in all manner of inversions and substitutions. I play a bit of plectrum banjo myself. If it's not too off-topic, here's a composition from the 1930s by Bud Cross, called Flirtation. It is not the flashy style, but gives some indication that the banjo was treated as a serious solo instrument at the time. There are four strings, tuned from the bass upwards, CGBD, and played with a pick. The melody often lay on the top string, and there is always a lot of movement up and down the neck.



    But George's father was one of the greatest ever fingerstyle banjo players, and maybe George had been impressed at an early age by the possibilities of a fingerstyle technique.
    Last edited by Rob MacKillop; 12-19-2013 at 04:43 AM.

  11. #60

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    When playing alone or in small groups, George predominately played with his fingers. However, when he played rhythm on his acoustic (no amplification), in the big bands, he had no choice but to play with the pick, otherwise his sound would not carry.

  12. #61

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    Well, that makes sense.

  13. #62

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    Rob, how long do you think it would take you to run a student through this book?

  14. #63

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    Depends on the student Really, it has hard to say. Some students are more dedicated and committed than others, some have more free time than others. But for one who does have the time and determination, there is still the question of how deep he or she goes into the material. One could - as I have done - go through the book quite quickly, but then spend the rest of ones life learning how to use it. The quick overview part might take anything from a month to a year, depending on reading skills and technique.

    I went through it more quickly than I would normally have done, just to let others see what is ahead, give an overview of the span of the book. Today I'm on the last page, and might get time to record it. But right after that I'll be heading back to page 1...

  15. #64

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    Final Page! Etude Study

    This is not an easy piece if you use Van Eps' left-hand fingering. There are a couple of places I was desperate to change to something more comfortable. But it is his study, after all, and one should try. So, this could have been better, but it gives a good idea, I hope, of what is asked of us.




    Here endeth my exploration of this intriguing book by one of the masters of the guitar. 30 videos in all. I won't be doing any more from the book, but I will be taking the book to the woodshed, practising and finding a use for the material.

    It would be great if someone else could upload other connected recordings or videos of their own.

    Best of luck! And I'll maybe bump into you in that woodshed!

    Rob

  16. #65

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    George's father was one of the greatest ever fingerstyle banjo players, and maybe George had been impressed at an early age by the possibilities of a fingerstyle technique.
    You may be right. It's certain that Fred Van Eps' life-long obsession with left hand fingering mechanisms made an impression on GVE's approach to the fingerboard.

    Another possibilty is that Andres Segovia's first U.S. concert tour in 1928 was an influence. I've read several accounts that every top flight guitarist in Manhattan attended The Maestro's concerts. It's likely that 15 year old George, already a working professional, attended one or more of those concerts.

    There is a book of articles and essays, edited by James Sallis, titled Jazz Guitars. The chapter Swing Guitar: The Acoustic Chordal Style by Richard Lieberson contains some excellent background on Van Eps, Allan Reuss, Carl Kress and Dick McDonough. The article highlights some important recordings by each player.

    Lost Chords by Richard Sudhalter contains a substantial, well-researched chapter on the guitarists of the swing era, a subject most historians manage to ignore.

  17. #66

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    Thanks for the book references, Jerome. It seems you have walked this path yourself many times over. If you are ever in Edinburgh, I'll buy you a coffee and you can tell me all about it ;-)

    Yes, Segovia influenced many guitarists of all genres.

  18. #67

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    Quote Originally Posted by monk
    Another possibilty is that Andres Segovia's first U.S. concert tour in 1928 was an influence....
    All of this and more is covered in Van Eps own words in the interview Ted Greene did: http://www.tedgreene.com/audio/TedGr...orgeVanEps.asp. There's both an audio version and the transcript that was published in Guitar Player; the latter is a lot quicker to deal with.

    His parents were divorced when he was five, the kids stayed with their mother, and he doesn't think his father was much of an influence. His father did take him to Segovia's first Town Hall concert. His hero had been Eddie Lang; after seeing this concert he added Segovia to Lang. He "... spent eight years with the classical repertoire ..." while also studying modern stuff. His brother Robert (pianist) seems to have had more influence on him than his mother (also a high end pianist) - at least that's who he specifically mentions. In fact, he says that while he listened to everybody, he mainly listened to piano players. (In this, he's far from the only old-time jazz/blues guitar player about whom I've read this; seems to me that those guys learned from the piano players in the same way that rock guitarists learned from the sax players.) One interesting tidbit is that George Gershwin was Fred Van Eps' accompanist for a while.

    Anyway, the interview is a quick read and beats speculation hands down.

  19. #68

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    Quote Originally Posted by mjt
    Rob, how long do you think it would take you to run a student through this book?
    I know I'm not Rob (I'm Phil), but I went through the entire book many years ago. The way I did it, I would guess that I put in maybe 200 - 250 hours total; maybe a bit more - I'm not entirely sure. I would frequently spend time playing the previous exercise before moving into the new one. I didn't always do the exercises in all keys, but certainly many keys. I spent time playing the same exercise over and over at tempo until I got it perfect - every chord right on time with no clams or muffled notes. The whole thing really helped develop my left hand skills. In terms of music or theory, I didn't have a clue what was going on. Still don't.

    If someone just wanted to 'work through the book', you could do it in much less time if you're already skilled. But I took Georges instructions at the front of the book at face value : discipline, perfection in timing and accuracy and fingering, etc. So that adds time that is quite worthwhile.

  20. #69

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    Quote Originally Posted by mjt
    Rob, how long do you think it would take you to run a student through this book?
    I need to be walked!



    Again, Rob thank you for these videos. They will be a motivation and a reference when I will hit a wall, and they will definitely help me get through the book.



    I have the Sallis book that Monk mentioned. Great read. I had never heard about Lost Chords by Sudhalter though, so thanks a lot for that, Jerome. It seems to be OOP, but I'll keep my eyes opened for a used copy.

  21. #70

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    Thanks, Richard. I managed to get the Sallis book through Amazon a few moments ago for 3.50 UK Pounds - about 5 USD. The Sudhalter is about 90 Pounds - way too much, but it should be in my local music library.

  22. #71

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    Quote Originally Posted by Eddie Lang
    I need to be walked!



    Again, Rob thank you for these videos. They will be a motivation and a reference when I will hit a wall, and they will definitely help me get through the book.



    I have the Sallis book that Monk mentioned. Great read. I had never heard about Lost Chords by Sudhalter though, so thanks a lot for that, Jerome. It seems to be OOP, but I'll keep my eyes opened for a used copy.
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Thanks, Richard. I managed to get the Sallis book through Amazon a few moments ago for 3.50 UK Pounds - about 5 USD. The Sudhalter is about 90 Pounds - way too much, but it should be in my local music library.
    I found my copy of Lost Chords for $15.00 US two years ago in a used bookstore locally. At 890 pages, it's a huge book and after a quick browse, I bought it solely for Chapter 21: Guitars, Solo and in Combination. Sudhalter, a trumpet player, was kind enough to spend some real time and effort researching Eddie Lang, Carl Kress, Lonnie Johnson, Dick McDonough, Van Eps, Eldon Shamblin, Snoozer Quinn and George Barnes.

  23. #72

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    "Snoozer Quinn" - wonderful name!

  24. #73

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    Quote Originally Posted by FatJeff
    And incidentally, this stuff is going to make an excellent introduction to the HM books. It introduces his unusual string-designation system (e.g. 1/3, 2/3, 2/B3, etc.), and the overall thought process he used in conceptualizing the instrument. I hope that after we get through this "slim" volume (which is incredibly dense), we can "graduate" onto the HM books and take it to the net level.

    Steve Herberman told me once that the HM volumes are actually just a distillation of GVE's collected works, which he kept in his house in several huge stacks that extended almost floor to ceiling. It took some dedicated advocates years to distill these down into the HM books after GVE's death. Can you just imagine the sheer volume of knowledge that Van Eps had to draw on as a guitarist and musician?
    George v. Eps told my teacher that the original HM books were the size of "phone books". What was the final result was the result of heavy editing. My teacher considers the HM books the "bible".
    I've downloaded the PDF and will, as the Brits say, "have a go". Gotta be careful with expressions-yesterday, I was reading about a great musician who had musically "topped herself". Someone remarked that meant she committed suicide in UK slang . Which thankfully she had not.

  25. #74

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    So I practiced exercise 1--fairly straight-forward harmonizing the C major scale with 1st inv triads. No explanation with the 6th degree of the scale (A) is harmonized with a 2nd inv F triad. I guess the fingering falls nicely in a legato manner to the B dim triad?

  26. #75

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    Don't know if you missed it before, but I read it as a IV (F) or iim7 (Dm7) to V (G7) to I (C). But it's ambiguity is useful.

  27. #76

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    In case you want to skip to where GVC talks about the A minor triad/ F major triad harmonization, it starts at about 13:00 on Disk 3: Part 1:

    GVE: Alright, I'll tell you why. Now we're talking about '37, '38.
    Guitar players were rhythm players at that time, in the big bands and
    99% of them were playing badly voiced chords -- barber shop chords we used to
    call them, where they were all six string chords with, like the big F chord
    or the E major chord, there are only 3 notes in them the rest are doubles so
    ... I showed Allan some of the voicings too where you play a Dm7 with the F major
    triad and the D on the 5th string instead of a big F chord or a bad sounding minor.

    So the guitar players had trouble at that time playing that F major chord with those fingers
    so I figured I'm going to throw that into the scale.
    In the back of the book if you look there's the C scale with the A minor ...
    I'm still not clear on what GVE is saying, but it sounds like he's thinking of xxx565 xxx767 xxx988 as a II V I, as a bit of a lesson to rhythm players who were are all banging out cowboy or barber shop voicings. The fact that later he does it with a A minor triad shows he doesn't think the A minor triad there is wrong or sounds bad.
    Last edited by BigDaddyLoveHandles; 12-27-2013 at 02:08 PM.

  28. #77

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    Yes, that's my interpretation too. The F chord is actually iim7 without the root - the last three chords are iim7, V7, I. The iim7 and the V7 are rootless.

  29. #78

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    There is a lot of ambiguity in his harmonisation. For instance, the chords xx323x and xx545xx could be seen as Dm and Em, or, more imaginatively, and maybe more interestingly, as G9 to CMaj7. Or even Dm to G6.

    That is why I view the line as a sequence of cadences, rather than the harmonisation of a major scale. It's fun to speculate.

  30. #79

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    I went over to Amazon to order the book. The price of this book is $235. I have to say that at that price I'll have to pass.

    Sounds like a good book though.

  31. #80

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    Amazon does come up with some ridiculous prices for out of print books sometimes. I got mine from ebay for about the same price as a set of strings.

  32. #81

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    Yeah. I got mine on ebay for BIN $5 (+ $15 for international shipping from the USA to Canada). I know that seller had a few copies at the time.

    I don't see any at the moment, but there is often a couple copies posted. Just wait and I'm sure one will pop up.

  33. #82

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    It's available as a pdf download from djangobooks.com for $10, and since it's only about 40 pages it's easy to print.

  34. #83

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    George Van Eps Guitar Method-gve-forms-jpg

    Hey guys, thought you'll might shed some light on this. I was checking out the streamlined GVE guitar method book, and the forms outlined in the very first example caught my eye. It deals with harmonizing the C maj scale in triads, with the scale degrees moving linearly as the top voice. if you look at the attached screenshot, the 6th degree of the scale, A is harmonized as an Fmaj (2nd inv) triad as opposed to a 2nd inv A min triad. given the rest of the scale degrees are harmonized with their respective diatonic triads, any reason why Fmaj is favored over Amin for the 6th degree?

    Thanks.

  35. #84

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    This is well known. My interpretation is that he is providing a IV (or ii)/ V/ I cadence, F or Dm7, G7, C, which is much more useful.
    Last edited by Rob MacKillop; 07-21-2014 at 03:15 AM.

  36. #85

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    As there are only three notes, there are a few ways of thinking of these chords, e.g.

    C / F6 / G6 / Dm7 / G / Dm7 / G7 / C

  37. #86

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    Rob MacKillop, I didn't know that you played Jazz too, nor that you participated in this forum. Just last week I was enjoying your YouTube videos of Baroque guitar. Most people play it with a tone that doesn't appeal to me, but your sound and playing is gorgeous. So very nice. I want a Baroque Guitar now!

    After watching your videos I wound up working up a bunch of BG pieces on my steel string tuned to DADGAD. I don't really care much for the way pieces originally written for BG sound on a modern classical, but the steel string gives more overtone shimmer and the DADGAD tuning opens up a lot of campanella options, a little like the BG. It'll have to do for me until I get a BG (plus, it's great practice working up things like that in DADGAD because it helps steer one away from playing all those pesky DADGAD cliches that sit right under your fingers).


    *****************

    Anyway, back to the topic at hand; I just looked through my 30 year old copy of volume one of the GVE book and all of his closed position triad studies use the Am for the 6th degree and not F, although I didn't find the exact study shown in AleikhBaba's post. Is this a difference between the streamlined version and the older one I have?

  38. #87

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    Hi circle110. Yes, I'm the same guy. Music is just music for me, without frontiers. I bet your DADGAD arrangements of baroque guitar music sounds wonderful. I might try it myself!

    BTW, the notes of Am are the same as a rootless Fmaj7...but, as I said before, there are a number of ways of interpreting these chords.

  39. #88

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    That's great Rob. If you do get around to making those DADGAD arrangements, let me know. I'd be interested to hear them. I'll do the same when I have videoed mine.

    Yes, I understand that Am = Fmaj7 minus root. As you say there are many ways of interpreting such chords. Heck, that Am triad could be seen as any of these C major diatonic chords: C6, Dm9, Emsus4(b13) [a bit far fetched], Fmaj7, G13sus4, Am or Bm7b5sus4(b9) [pretty far fetched].

    I see what you are saying about the usage of F major in place of Am creating a IV-V-I or ii-V-I chord sequence in the Van Eps exercise. It's just that in my edition, he doesn't do that. It's always a minor triad on the 6th degree.

    For decades I have kept the Van Eps book on my practice room shelf and regularly pull it down and open it to a random page and work through whatever is presented on that page. Always challenging, always rewarding.
    Many years ago I went through the whole book in sequence over a period of several months. That was a heck of a lot of work but well worth it.

    My two desert island guitar study books would be the Van Eps volumes and Mick Goodrick's Advancing Guitarist. I could happily keep busy eating mangoes and studying those books until the rescue ship came!
    [If I got exhausted studying those books, I could always spin my tuners into DADGAD and play some Gaspar Sanz.]


    Michael

  40. #89

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    Bm7b5sus4(b9)

    That's so obvious, I'm kicking myself for not seeing it

    That island sounds inviting!

  41. #90

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    One thing I've always found the hardest about the George Van Eps method is the legato. I took a class with one of George's students and he was incredibly strict about this (apparently George was too). I'm referring to the top section on page 5.

    “It is important to remember that the exercises in this book should be practiced very legato. In order to do so, the notes must be given their full value and must be connected with no pause between them. The changes from formation to formation must be executed in the least amount of time. Do not stint the value of the notes in order to give yourself time to make the next formation. In making these quick shifts, do not rush the tempo. Plant your fingers solidly and firmly on the fingerboard. After releasing the pressure on a formation get used to forming the next position while the hand is in motion. Do not wait until the hand arrives at the location before forming the fingers. This saves time and naturally goes hand in hand with the legato principle."

    "The reason legato is being stressed so much is because it is the hardest form of phrasing for the guitar. Staccato, the reverse, is the natural form and therefore the easiest one. In practicing legato remember to re-apply the pressure for each formation. Do not slide around holding the pressure, yet do not go to the extreme by lifting the fingers too far off the strings during the change. Eliminate all waste motion with the fingers. The closer they are to the fingerboard, the less time it takes to place them. The mechanics of these exercises have been carefully planned and tested."
    Last edited by Dana; 07-29-2014 at 06:32 PM.

  42. #91

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    This is a printing error don't justify it as something else . A harmonized C scale ....Amin is the 6th degree!

  43. #92

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    Quote Originally Posted by marcwv
    This is a printing error don't justify it as something else . A harmonized C scale ....Amin is the 6th degree!
    It is definitely not a printing error.

    A couple of years ago, I posted a link to Ted Greene's recorded interview with Van Eps that can be heard at TedGreene.com. Van Eps discusses why he did that. Search this website for the post if you're interested in listening to the interview.

  44. #93

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Bm7b5sus4(b9)

    That's so obvious, I'm kicking myself for not seeing it
    I know, I know.

    You have to consider that it's coming from an odd guy like me that spends his time when waiting in line at the grocery store thinking about stuff like "what intervals are the notes of a Bb13 when superimposed over F#m?".

    (ignoring enharmonic arguments: Maj3/b6/maj7/9/b5/6/b9)


    Exercises like that will either 1) keep my mind sharp in rapidly approaching old age, or 2) drive me insane.

    At least it keeps from from getting angry at the lady in front of me that holds up the checkout line for 10 minutes digging through her purse to find a 50 cent coupon.

  45. #94

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    I studied with James Chirillo, and he also emphasized the legato bit with the GVE Method ebook. I still refer back to those studies, as I find them more comprehensive than the series he later published (even though the method book is so short).

    The triadic studies are great for comping "on the fly", as Steve Herberman puts it. I am making an effort to avoid clinging to the ol' grips and branching out into movable triads. GVE also helps you look at comping as a horizontal craft rather than a string of vertical harmonies that jump all over the place.

    Julian Lage said something interesting to that effect of practicing compin interms of key centers instead of progressions. Anyway, off to the shed.

  46. #95

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    That last comment is interesting!

  47. #96

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    Rob,

    Thanks for taking an interest, I love your videos on GVE. I have been experimenting with triadic movements on my classical. Since the intonation is out on the lower strings, I have been practicing comping ideas on the top three strings. I am discovering pianoistic sounds, and findin new movement oppurtunities in the top 3. I will upload my explorations to this thread soon.

  48. #97

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    Please do! It is my pleasure. These old guys really knew the guitar, and saw it in a largely different way than we do today. So it is always good to go backwards and try to understand their thinking. From my experience, I can definitely say that what they have to say is always relevant. And GVE understood the guitar better than most.

  49. #98

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    Please do! It is my pleasure. These old guys really knew the guitar, and saw it in a largely different way than we do today. So it is always good to go backwards and try to understand their thinking. From my experience, I can definitely say that what they have to say is always relevant. And GVE understood the guitar better than most.
    My feelings exactly.

    Most of the guitarists from that era, beginning with Eddie Lang, listened heavily to the works of the Neoclassical composers such as Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, de Falla and Albeniz among others.

    This showed up in both written and recorded compositions as well as their approach to accompaniment and definitely informed their use of chord substitutions. They were open-minded about music and many of them, such as Carl Kress, George Van Eps, Frank Victor and George M. Smith played on pop music recording dates, motion picture soundtracks, radio programs and in dance bands.

  50. #99

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    Just curious, do you guys recommend going through all the exercise first in the key of C and then going back and transposing them into the other keys, or going through all the keys lesson by lesson as GVE suggests in the book?

    I am tempted to go through everything in C first.

  51. #100

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    Quote Originally Posted by monk
    Hello Everyone,
    I thought I would chime in with a few comments regarding this discussion.

    @Rob: It's a wonderful thing that you're doing here. Helping keep this material alive and in the consciousness of guitarists is most commendable.

    @FatJeff: Harmonic Mechanisms was published two decades before Van Eps' death. The distillation of GVE's lifes work work to which you refer was personally done by George and his daughter, Kay.

    The question regarding the harmonization of the sixth degree was discussed in another thread on this forum some time back. If you go to the Ted Greene website, the taped interview TG did with GVE is available for listening. Van Eps reveals why he did that.

    As for any changes in Van Eps' thinking over the years, I can't pretend to know what went on in his mind but he does stress many times throughout Harmonic Mechanisms the continued importance of triads.

    Many guitarists who have only heard GVE's mellower fingerstyle recordings from the 1960s sometimes have difficulty understanding why Van Eps was considered the BEST guitarist of his generation as well as his emphasis on the importance of triads. By listening to earlier recordings, we can hear that he possessed not only a staggering command of his instrument but also an understanding of harmony that was deeper than most of his contemporaries.

    Here is a clip of GVE playing Back Home Again in Indiana with Jess Stacy. Notice some of the things he does with triads.
    In the pickup measure he plays a Bb triad over C7 to create a C9sus4 sound followed by an Am triad for a C13 sound.
    In the first measure he plays a C triad over F for an Fmaj9 sound then a Bbm triad over Eb7.
    The second measure begins with an Am over D7 followed by a nod to the dominant seventh exercise from his method book.
    The third measure begins with a half-step slide from Ebm to Em then Fdim triad all played over G7.
    All in all, some really slick playing. I'll leave you to delve deeper into the tune as you wish.
     
    Jerome you got me hooked.


    I found this recording and several other cuts of GVE playing with Jess Stacy available on iTunes for those of you like me who live on their phones and download everything.

    Jess Stacy Piane Solos

    There's two albums. One with eight tracks and the other with the eight plus eight additional tracks (the additional eight are sans guitar, probably a different album added on).

    The Rollini track "Somebody Loves Me" is on iTunes but is part of a compilation.

    Adrian Rollini 1934-1938

    I know Rollini played with different guitarists so I don't know if GVE is the guitarist on all the tracks but there is plenty of guitar heard on all the tracks.

    CB
    Last edited by TheGrandWazoo; 03-22-2015 at 08:39 PM.