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  1. #701

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #702
    That cycle 5 harmonic minor is the ascending counterpart to the cycle 4 which shares the 2 common tone 2 shifting voice movement. Curiously the two groupings in cycle 4 and 5 are independent from each other whereas all other cycles eventually go through the cycles in all inversions.
    The harmonic minor is so beautiful and I find utility in this by making the G7 (V7) chord the destination chord of the cycle, and thereby turn this run into a voice led progression that can be used in any tune by having it serve as a dominant feed in to any chord. Nice if used as a secondary dominant chord because in addition to the non diatonic nature of the harmonic minor, is the "outside" yet mysteriously beautiful non diatonic harmonic structure of secondary dominants.

    And for further mind bending, take all those Eb's and turn them into E's and you have some VERY cool harmonic major sounds!

  4. #703

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    Yeah, always noticed that about cycle 4 and 5. Understand the choice made because the alternative although nice requires jumping around a bit more in order to address all the inversions. Might look something like this in drop 2:

    Cycle 4:

    CGBEb ..... EbAbCF ..... FBDAb ..... GDEbB .... etc.

    Cycle 5:

    CGBEb ..... BFGD ..... AbDFC ...... GCEbAb .... etc.

  5. #704
    Just to put it out there:

    Diatonically (alter chord qualities and intervals for different scale types)

    Cycle 2 descends
    ... IMaj | II- | III- | IVMaj | V7 | VI- | VII-7b5 | IMaj | II- | III- | IVMaj | V7 | VI- | VII-7b5 | IMaj | II- ...

    Cycle 4 ascends
    ... IMaj | IVMaj | VII-7b5 | III- | VI- | II- | V7 | IMaj | IVMaj | VII-7b5 | III- | VI- | II- | V7 | IMaj | IVMaj ...

    Cycle 6 ascends
    ... IMaj | Vi- | IVMaj | II- | VII-7b5 | V7 | III- | IMaj | VI- | IVMaj | II- | VII-7b5 | V7 | III- | IMaj | VI- ...

    Cycle 7 descends
    ... IMaj | VII-7b5 | VI- | V7 | IVMaj | III- | II- | IMaj | VII-7b5 | VI- | V7 | IVMaj | III- | II- | IMaj | VII-7b5 ...

    Cycle 5 descends
    ... IMaj | V7 | II- | VI- | III- | VII-7b5 | IVMaj | IMaj | V7 | II- | VI- | III- | VII-7b5 | IVMaj | IMaj | V7 ...

    Cycle 3 descends
    ... IMaj | III- | V7 | VII-7b5 | II- | IVMaj | VI- | IMaj | III- | V7 | VII-7b5 | II- | IVMaj | VI- | IMaj | III- ...

    So instead of key specific (absolute nomenclature) I'm using diatonic chord designation-roman numeral (relative nomenclature) so this is easier translated to any key you're working in. If you're not comfortable with thinking of chords this way, then working with this material is going to be challenging. It deals with movements within tonal centres and if you "Play by the chord names" strictly, then these alternative routes are somewhat counter to that thinking.
    I also gave 2 octaves so you can see entire sections easily, (see a II V I progression without a break in the line...).
    Also you can see that cycle 2 and cycle 7 are complementary, but one ascends and the other descends, 3 and 6 the same, 4 and 5 too.
    I also observe that cycle 4 has groupings of major triad chords together, and minor triad groups together. This is really handy for me because sometimes I want a line of chords with a darker, more minor sounding quality for the line, and sometimes using a smooth group of chords with a major quality sound has a very different effect.
    Cycle 3 and 6 share a lot of common tones so the movement is subtle and the movement along the neck is not as dramatic.
    When I really start practicing these, I learn to perceive movement that is not as function oriented to my ear, but more melodic. I can't really describe this further, but it's something that seems to be an observation with others whom I've worked with.
    As I work with a cycle:
    First I try to get the fingering right, and my fluency with fingerboard note locations and chord shapes on different strings improved.
    Next I try to navigate the chords by knowing where the root movement goes, and lateral movement across the fingerboard improved.
    Then I tried to hear the movement of voices that lead me to the next chord root, and my ear really improved.
    Then I tried to be aware visually how my hands were moving from one aural note grouping (chord) to the next moved, and many of my habits of chord grabs and chord movements were freed.
    Then I tried to feel the chords (kinesthetic) as they moved. This has given my hands a totally new "hand sense" which I find unconsciously creeping into everything I play. When I hit "the zone", I'm finding sounds I never suspected, connexions across the fingerboard I never used, visualizations and traveling up and down the neck within and between changes in ways I can't explain.
    And the connective tissue between theory, ear and hand gets stronger in ways they've not connected before.

    So just some observations in the midst of the COVID immersion.
    Last edited by Jimmy blue note; 07-04-2020 at 03:39 PM.

  6. #705

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    Here's a question about fingerings for triad spread voicings.

    If you start on say strings 4,3,1 and the cycle is going down the neck, is it best (when starting out) to
    stay on the same string set even if there is a difficult stretch? If you stay on the same string set
    you can see the voice movement better and I have found some gaps with some positions I am unfamiliar with
    and have to think a little harder as to where the chord tones are.

    Or should I just switch to a different string set at that point and save injury to my hands?

    I think the considerations are a little different for 4 note voicings.

  7. #706

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note View Post

    Cycle 2 descends
    ... IMaj | II- | III- | IVMaj | V7 | VI- | VII-7b5 | IMaj | II- | III- | IVMaj | V7 | VI- | VII-7b5 | IMaj | II- ...

    Cycle 4 ascends
    ... IMaj | IVMaj | VII-7b5 | III- | VI- | II- | V7 | IMaj | IVMaj | VII-7b5 | III- | VI- | II- | V7 | IMaj | IVMaj ...

    Cycle 6 ascends
    ... IMaj | Vi- | IVMaj | II- | VII-7b5 | V7 | III- | IMaj | VI- | IVMaj | II- | VII-7b5 | V7 | III- | IMaj | VI- ...

    Cycle 7 descends
    ... IMaj | VII-7b5 | VI- | V7 | IVMaj | III- | II- | IMaj | VII-7b5 | VI- | V7 | IVMaj | III- | II- | IMaj | VII-7b5 ...

    Cycle 5 descends
    ... IMaj | V7 | II- | VI- | III- | VII-7b5 | IVMaj | IMaj | V7 | II- | VI- | III- | VII-7b5 | IVMaj | IMaj | V7 ...

    Cycle 3 descends
    ... IMaj | III- | V7 | VII-7b5 | II- | IVMaj | VI- | IMaj | III- | V7 | VII-7b5 | II- | IVMaj | VI- | IMaj | III- ...

    Shouldn't that be:

    Cycle 2 descends

    Cycle 4 descends

    Cycle 6 descends

    Cycle 7 ascends

    Cycle 5 ascends

    Cycle 3 ascends

    Am I missing something, or do I have a copy of the book from an alternate universe?

    .

  8. #707
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnoL View Post
    Here's a question about fingerings for triad spread voicings.

    If you start on say strings 4,3,1 and the cycle is going down the neck, is it best (when starting out) to
    stay on the same string set even if there is a difficult stretch? If you stay on the same string set
    you can see the voice movement better and I have found some gaps with some positions I am unfamiliar with
    and have to think a little harder as to where the chord tones are.

    Or should I just switch to a different string set at that point and save injury to my hands?

    I think the considerations are a little different for 4 note voicings.
    As you observed, it's easier to see within the same string set. But NEVER push it when you feel discomfort. Remember you can always move an octave up and continue.
    I have been working with the triads, close and spread and in the root in the middle voicings of the spread, there are at least 3 ways you can finger the same chord. Work with one until you're really familiar, then expand your knowledge. Don't get overwhelmed. There may be a number of ways to finger an individual chord; be patient. All this knowledge will greatly broaden the way you relate to chords and the tendency of movement to the next chord when you have them under your fingers.
    Eventually you'll know these voicings by ear on all sets of strings. Once you are over the learning curve, you'll fearlessly use these chords in all applications, parallel voicings or voice led, or combined.
    That's one of the things about this, it may look like a lot of work, but in learning it in such an exhaustive and broadly non prejudicial way, you don't acquire gaps in your knowledge based on just fingering things one way.
    Again NEVER stretch your hands if they feel uncomfortable.
    Good warm ups are an excellent idea. Do you warm up your fingers and hands before a practice session? A good warm up will set the tone of the entire day. Its value cannot be overestimated.
    Good luck

  9. #708
    Quote Originally Posted by FwLineberry View Post
    Shouldn't that be:

    Cycle 2 descends

    Cycle 4 descends

    Cycle 6 descends

    Cycle 7 ascends

    Cycle 5 ascends

    Cycle 3 ascends

    Am I missing something, or do I have a copy of the book from an alternate universe?

    .
    Sorry, I'm basing this on triads. I'm working almost exclusively with triads these days. This is describing the overall movement of the individual voices, so on a cycle 4 spread triad progression, the root is a common tone that becomes the 5th, the third ascends up a scale degree and becomes the root of the next chord and the fifth moves up diatonically to become the 3rd of the next chord.
    The overall movement is an ascending one for the least amount of movement.

  10. #709

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnoL View Post
    Here's a question about fingerings for triad spread voicings.

    If you start on say strings 4,3,1 and the cycle is going down the neck, is it best (when starting out) to
    stay on the same string set even if there is a difficult stretch? If you stay on the same string set
    you can see the voice movement better and I have found some gaps with some positions I am unfamiliar with
    and have to think a little harder as to where the chord tones are.

    Or should I just switch to a different string set at that point and save injury to my hands?

    I think the considerations are a little different for 4 note voicings.


    I'm working through this stuff to practice inversions as well as voice leading, so I just stay on the same string set and arpeggiate any chords I can't reach.

    I can see where a person needs to work through this stuff utilizing more than one string set, and using more practical fingerings, as well.

    .

  11. #710
    Here's an applied overview of one route to improvisation that includes the voice leading material in the context of All The Things You Are.



    Thanks to Kenji Herbert for contributing this beautiful example.

  12. #711

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    Hello Guy
    the voicings on your post #701 remind me very much of Don Grolnick's tune 'The Cost of Living', which was recorded on Michael Brecker's first album. It's on YouTube.

    That tune is (conveniently) in C minor as well, and harmonised with harmonic minor, and melodic minor, plus a modulation or two. You can see some of the score on Scribd.

    Regards
    Mick W
    Last edited by Mick Wright; 07-05-2020 at 10:48 AM.

  13. #712

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    Hi Jimmy blue note

    You'll know that the falling fifths / rising fourths thing will also works well, when dealing with seventh chords (well, you said 'you were almost exclusively working with triads). I thought that you might enjoy trying this one for a breath of fresh ''sevenths' air!
    Almanac three has a great alternative voicings section where Mick Goodrick starts to mix the voicings within sequences from scale step to scale step (e.g. cycle 2, alternating drop 3 and drop 2&4, below, and also a very full sounding 'falling fifths' sequence, in a drop 3 voicing). I like the fact that in cycle 2 here the basic scale rises steadily in voices two and four, while the roots move between the other two voices.
    All the best
    Mick W.

    Anybody use the Goodchord Voice Leading Books?-almanac_3-32-jpg


    Anybody use the Goodchord Voice Leading Books?-almanac_3-32ii-jpg
    Last edited by Mick Wright; 07-05-2020 at 11:47 AM.

  14. #713

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    Thought I'd share here a preview of a project I'm working on. I'm not a programmer, but have been having fun with this.

    So far, just for seventh chords, but will not be too difficult to include triad, quartal, triad-add4, etc. Also option for including open strings.


    Staff notation or audio would probably be well beyond my capabilities.

    Any suggestions from viewing? Just for general use and exploration - likely a promotional tool for my own instruction, to be frank, but also has just been a fun thing to put together during quarantine here.

    Posting this as the video uploads:


    Comment on the TAB voicings.

    User has two options:

    Select string sets, or select max fret range.

    When selecting string sets, voicing shows whether or not the octave is possible on that string.

    When selecting fret range, I came up with some formula to show a combination of what leads from chord to chord best as well as what is most practical. When 'fret range' is selected, In some cases a dozen voicings are shown, in some 1 or none, as some chords have more fingerings than other.

  15. #714

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jimmy blue note View Post
    Attachment 73632Take a progression that has a beginning and an end, and chart a route with the same chord voicing family (closed triads, spread triads, drop 2, drop 2 drop 4...what ever you want) and move the chord roots by cycle (step wise cycle 2, in thirds cycle 3, in 4ths cycle 4...) and follow the chord movement until you reach the end.
    I really like this approach, because it also increases the mileage for each cycle that you learn.

    It's very obvious that Cycle 4 is an easy way to go from I to IV:

    Cmaj7 -> Fmaj7

    But keep those chords to two beats each, and it's also a good way to go from I to vii:

    Cmaj7 -> Fmaj7 -> Bm7b5

    And over two measures (or one measure with one beat each), you go from I to vi:

    Cmaj7 -> Fmaj7 -> Bm7b5 -> Em7 -> Am7