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  1. #1
    I always check:

    Premier guitar
    Peghear Nation (acoustic guitars)
    Norm rare guitars (kind of boring lately)
    Emerald city guitars, they show nice guitars but badly too short and the style of playing is not of my kind.
    Dream guitars (great looking guitars)

    etc, etc.

    Which others are good channels ?

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Rick Beato has some gear related videos that I like.

  4. #3

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    Mark Knopfler has a great channel. He continues to write and record to this day. All the videos on his channel are really high quality, concert footage, interviews, documentaries, discussions about writing recording producing tunes, etc.





    Last edited by fep; 12-13-2019 at 05:38 PM.

  5. #4

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    Here's an easy one, Fretboard Journal.



  6. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ScottM
    Rick Beato has some gear related videos that I like.
    Beato’s also has some episodes on the “philosophy” of music (what makes this song great) and the business side of music. Rhett Shull, who partners frequently with Beato, also has some segments on being a successful gigging guitarist.

    Adam Nealy, is often good, but on occasion repetitive.

  7. #6
    Thanks for the suggestions.

    Yeap, Fretboard Journal is good.

    Im mostly interested in watch guitars. Dont know, its hard to find good stuff about archtop guitars, all people is with those solid body guitars... and rock... and ditorsion... and effects... hard to find people into clean tones.

    As always say, its hard to find something in internet to fully fill all mind expectations, but... its not bad to try it.

    Thanks for the suggestions.

  8. #7

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    I've watched those rig rundown vids from Premier Guitar.
    And search for "jazz guitar workshop" or something like that occasionally to check if something new(or very old and rare) has popped up.

  9. #8

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    Greg Koch reviewing for Wildwood Guitars is fun for some, and quite a player. Has been known to play an overdriven L5, so not for purists.


  10. #9

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  11. #10

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    Tim Lerch's channel is a favourite:

    Timothy Lerch
    - YouTube

  12. #11

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    I second Fretboard Journal and Tim Lerch...



    I like channels that do not try to tell everything about anything from ''how to play like Wes in twenty minutes'' to 'negative harmony' and 'pros and cons of showbiz' an dalso they often seem to try to make me like them too persistently. Try to entertain me with comparison something with somethign and making weird faces and animations an dall that...
    Too much sales today in everything...

  13. #12

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    I also check out Rick Beato, sometimes, though he tends to go on a bit long for me. Chris Whiteman, who sometimes posts here, has great chord-melody arrangements and lessons that are very well presented. Jake Reichbert, too. Purely for the entertainment value, I like Jimmy Bruno's channel (though I haven't watched him in a while). My guiltiest pleasure, though, is not a particular channel, but the genre of "reaction" videos. There are a whole bunch by younger black hip-hop-oriented guys listening to stuff like Led Zeppelin songs and being totally blown away.

    John

  14. #13

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    Andertons from the UK are doing some great stuff. A lot of gear reviews. Most of them quite funny (especially if with Rob Chapman), but mostly nothing for the jazz guys.
    But they are doing great interviews as well:

    Last edited by Stanford J17; 12-18-2019 at 12:33 PM. Reason: auto-correct

  15. #14

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    These guys did some great stuff, too. Unfortunately they stopped 4 years ago. But they have interviews with Howard Alden, Earl Klugh, etc.

    I stumbled upon Rory Hoffman through this channel:

  16. #15

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    Tim Pierce's channel!

    He's a studio musician does a lot of different content, and has a fun vibe. Here he is doing some studio work at his home in his studio "cockpit" and then does a lesson of part of what he recorded.



    A lot of his videos are with another guitar player, here with Carl Verheyan (another LA studio guy)

    Last edited by fep; 12-18-2019 at 02:30 PM.

  17. #16

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    Piano, but I really like how this guy analyzes things.

    David Bennett Piano
    - YouTube

  18. #17
    Thanks all for the replies !

  19. #18

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    This guy:



    And this guy:


  20. #19

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    Being new to the electric guitar world, I've learned a few things from Dylan Talks Tone.

  21. #20

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    For recording:

    Making Records w/Eric Valentine - YouTube

    pureMix - pureMix
    - YouTube


    Produce Like a Pro - Produce Like A Pro
    - YouTube

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by lammie200
    Piano, but I really like how this guy analyzes things.

    David Bennett Piano
    - YouTube
    For piano/jazz stuff, I watched several of these from Open Studio: Open Studio
    - YouTube

  23. #22

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    Hi everyone.
    I have 2 questions related to the so-many youtube guitar teachers out there. The first is:
    Who do you think are among the youtube jazz guitar teachers you would recommend a
    a) total beginner to watch
    b)an intermediate player to watch
    c) an advanced player to watch
    If you can name more than one, that'll be even better. More the merrier.
    And my 2nd qn is:
    Do you believe a student can gather a good all-round education in jazz guitar playing from youtube tutorials alone? Or do they need supplementation.
    I am both curious and would also like feedback on this.
    Would help MANY jazz guitar students I am sure!

    Thanks in advance!

  24. #23

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    Most of YouTube is demonstration, not teaching. Teaching is a relationship.

    There's a few people out there who make short, to the point demos that are true sharing of information, not just hearing themselves talk. Dani Rabin would be my favorite of these.
    There are other people, like Christiaan Van Hemmert that I watch videos of less to learn specific ideas but more to hear them talk about a broader topic and glean what I can. Christianm77, who posts here, is another person who has made some long videos that aren't as much teaching in my book, but more like a TED talk for guitar. Lots of good stuff to think about, but not for the impatient.

    Reg, who posts here, (Reg523 on YT, I think?) makes simple, one camera YouTube vids where you can't even see his face, and they're more valuable than about 95% of the other junk that's out there.

    And a student of jazz can absolutely NOT learn from YouTube alone. Jazz is music that is played with others, not in a bedroom by yourself.

  25. #24

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    There are some decent ones. I like Sandra Sherman:

    Guitarversum Sandra Sherman
    - YouTube

  26. #25

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    Tim Lerch is a great player and teacher.

  27. #26

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    You really need structure to learn anything. Youtube is formless.

    The Truefire courses are not expensive. If you like video-learning check out the Truefire courses.

    Find someone whose course you like and ask for opinions here.

    Randy Vincent's excellent Intro to Jazz Guitar is a must-have. https://www.amazon.com/Guitarists-In...s%2C444&sr=8-1 .

  28. #27

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    My response is probably more beginner/intermediate oriented, as that is what I am; Justin Sandercoe, Tim Lerch, Sandra Sherman, Pat Donahue. I like to sample random youtube videos to see whose style of teaching suits me. I've noticed there are some youtube-ers who post here, they may not be trying to be teachers per se but their playing is definitely worth emulating, Chris Whiteman is one name that comes to mind.

    Although I have enjoyed learning much from youtube videos, there is definitely a lot to be gained from the direct personal interaction you can get with a good instructor, that has helped me tremendously.

  29. #28

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    Asking elsewhere, I get a lot of recommendations for Jens Larson. I am glad to get so many alternatives from you all. Thanks a heap.

  30. #29

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubert
    Asking elsewhere, I get a lot of recommendations for Jens Larson. I am glad to get so many alternatives from you all. Thanks a heap.
    Jens has a lot of good stuff on his channel from beginner to advanced.

  31. #30

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    There's a lot to be said for learning jazz from musicians that aren't guitarists.

  32. #31

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    I suggest checking out a few of the multiple channels, e.g. Christiaan van Hemert, Jens Larson, Things I learned from Barry Harris, Tim Lerch, Barry Greene, Rich Severson. They all have very different approaches. See what resonates. Then, stick with them. As far as I know all the above do skype lessons, and that is what you would need to do. Even if, say, Tim Lerch's free material is too advanced, I'm sure he could teach a beginner.

  33. #32

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    I agree...many of the YT teachers are way too long winded. I prefer the approach where the subject matter at hand is played directly at the beginning video then taught in a succinct manner. Also a video where there is one basic learning point helps with retention. I don't need to see the poster's infomercial or their plea to subscribe every time.

    Robin Nolan posts videos that are short, clear and informative.

  34. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubert
    And my 2nd qn is:
    Do you believe a student can gather a good all-round education in jazz guitar playing from youtube tutorials alone?
    for myself, early in my development I didn't have a good ear for rhythmic nuance. So, for me, my development would have been stunted if I did not have a teacher say to me "your 8th notes are not happening at all". Which you're not going to get from youtube.

    That said, not everyone has this particular problem. Some people have natural feel and never really need to work on that aspect of their playing. a lot of the value of teachers is paying someone to be honest with you about your playing and what's not good.

  35. #34

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    Not strictly jazz. But I think Nahre Sol is the best musical education content provider on youtube:
    How to Sound Like J.S. Bach - YouTube

  36. #35

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  37. #36

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    I like Jeff’s comment on my channel. I never set out to teach via YouTube because I think that’s a problematic thing to try and do. It’s also quite hard to make a good YT video. I think I’ve improved...

    People think they know what they need to learn, but actually they might not. Feedback from a teacher is important.

    also simple transmission of information is not really teaching. Teaching is problem solving. Trying to dig more than this out of YT is very hard.

    OTOH I didn’t want to present myself as an expert in any of the things I was trying to do, to ‘demonstrate’ because again I’m not comfortable. Anything that is interesting to me to make a video about is kind of something I’m learning too.

    However my vids are becoming more lesson like and a bit shorter and more focused. Here’s some recent ones:




    given the current situation I might start doing a more coherent course of jazz guitar lessons of around 5m while trying to make them interactive to an extent. The YT comments section is a good resource for this.

  38. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by pcsanwald
    for myself, early in my development I didn't have a good ear for rhythmic nuance. So, for me, my development would have been stunted if I did not have a teacher say to me "your 8th notes are not happening at all". Which you're not going to get from youtube.

    That said, not everyone has this particular problem. Some people have natural feel and never really need to work on that aspect of their playing. a lot of the value of teachers is paying someone to be honest with you about your playing and what's not good.
    most intermediate jazz guitarists have time problems without realising it though, lets be honest.

    more advanced players might have timing problems but at least they know haha

    So the YouTube thing is like - do a video on harmony or playing fusion licks or something, get more views than if you do a video on time/feel or swing. So it’s pretty obvious what people are obsessed with.

  39. #38

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    Christian, what are your thoughts on Skype lessons or online "schools"? I'm still very much a beginner and am overwhelmed trying to learn myself. Feel paralyzed to be honest.

  40. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by DMgolf66
    Christian, what are your thoughts on Skype lessons or online "schools"? I'm still very much a beginner and am overwhelmed trying to learn myself. Feel paralyzed to be honest.
    Online schools - can’t recommend because I haven’t used them. Skype lessons are not as good as in person lessons, but given the current situation are the best option.

    TBH I think you should try and find a course or teacher that will offer you feedback on recordings and/or videos of your playing and advise accordingly. Video call tech is really not very good for offering feedback on playing in terms of timing etc as it’s very glitchy (at least for me.)

    if it’s just learning info to get started - the first few tunes, chord grips etc, probably one of the beginners jazz courses such as the one on this site would probably good.

  41. #40

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    I agree with the points made above about the irreplaceable benefits of person-to-person teaching and playing together - feedback, mentoring, cross-pollination.... That said, if you manage not to be completely swept away, there is a lot of great "self-learning" tools out there. I have many good TrueFire courses that taught me something.

    Among YT teachers the one I am most following is Jens Larsen. All of his lessons are useful, some are great, and not a few are absolutely stellar and open up totally usable insights that really improve your playing.

  42. #41

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    If you're seriously interested in a good online teacher, get in touch with Peter Sklaroff.

  43. #42
    Jkniff26 Guest
    I do follow Barry Harris and Jordan Klemmons, some doses of Jimmy Bruno, Adam Nealey occasionaly. The YT people are great musicians , but Too many instructors is a wormhole I want to avoid. I am actually afraid to open anything that says “do this” , “don’t do this” , “never never this” ,”Christian says this aint a thing “ect.... I do like Christian though, soooo British and that’s cool.
    So for me I love the live concerts and the challenge of playing tunes in different keys, maybe learning a solo here and there or noting the difference in arrangements of a tune. Whoa just too much great music on there to get bogged down or distracted. I Like the 60’s variety shows and gasp at how great performers like Louis Armstrong and Dione Warwick were patronized. Oh and the Lovely and fantastic Astrud Gilberto right there on the screen tearing my heart apart. I get to play along a bit. Ella Fitzgerald , Carole King, Sir Paul, Muddy Waters, Dexter Gordon, Coltrane, Sarah Vaughn, Doris Day, Sinatra, Joe Pass, Basie, Oscar Peterson, Nat King Cole, Ray Charles, Mancini, Jobim, Etta James, oh Lord if kids knew how special what they have is. I knew these people’s music , but never saw most of them in concert. And Jazz !!! like full concerts of Buddy Rich or Dizzie, and Wynton Marsalis and how much blues those guys play; soooo sooo much blues . Oh and Bonnie Raitt and Norah Jones,and always Willie n Merle and some western swing, don’t forget Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Reverend Davis , Lightnin Hopkins; I mean it’s all so inspiring. Gigs and gigs of live reels.
    Anyway sorry . Lonely quarantine rant with a touch of optimism.



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jkniff26
    . I am actually afraid to open anything that says “do this” , “don’t do this” , “never never this”
    In my opinion, you need to lose that fear. Take what a master has to offer and understand that they have perfected an approach that has enabled them to make the music you love. Do what you will with it in your own playing but to ignore it will be to your detriment.

    There is no single right answer. There are countless right answers.

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    Christiaan Van Hemmert

    He actually is pretty great but wasn't aware of him (unlike Christian and Reg) .. Thanks for this one!

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont

    Reg, who posts here, (Reg523 on YT, I think?) makes simple, one camera YouTube vids where you can't even see his face, and they're more valuable than about 95% of the other junk that's out there.
    It's been years since I checked, but we finally see the face!


  47. #46

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    youtube is the spinal tap of the 21st century




  48. #47

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    Hi there,

    My name is Jordan and I just started a YT channel where I'll be posting some instructional content. I also offer online lessons (feel free to DM me or email me at jordan.e.stern@gmail.com if you're interested).

    Jordan Stern
    - YouTube

  49. #48

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    The biggest issue I’ve come across with any instruction on YouTube is that there’s no curriculum. Usually the producers didn’t set down and say “I’ll start here and then build video by video to end what I want to teach HERE.” It’s more... we’ll say teaching a scale or song than the applications later if that makes sense.

    And so many other comments are right: you need a back and forth to maximize the effectiveness of it and make sure you’re getting it.

    I’m a big fan of TrueFire because they definitely have the first part down where they build from a specific point to a higher point, but there’s no back and forth.

    Because of this, I mainly use Artist Works because there’s a curriculum that builds and you record a video of you playing it for the instructor to review (who records a video response). All of these videos are viewable by everyone in the class so everyone can learn from everyone else. I think that’s a handy way of doing things in the modern age.

    I still use TrueFire and books, though. I try to get whatever I formation I can from wherever I can, but good I striction has a solid path so you can chart progress and mentors that will tell you when you start to mess up and how to fix it.

  50. #49

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    Ah curricula are overrated.

    the problem for YT is not lack of a curriculum, it’s lack of an environment for people to apply their skills, encounter problems and and work out solve them with help from teachers.

    Gigs are good for that, but none of us doing that.

    thats how learning really works.
    Last edited by christianm77; 04-25-2020 at 09:15 AM.

  51. #50

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    One of my friends takes this position: "everything you need to know is on records".

    That's hard to argue with, if you're capable of learning everything you need to know that way.

    Most of us, including some of the greats, learned from teachers too.

    I don't know how to recommend one to somebody who is already a player. I'd need to know what their goals are, what they know, what they're good at, what needs work, what resources they have to play with other musicians etc. etc.

    For a beginner who wants to be a "well-rounded jazz player" I'm still not sure who I'd suggest, but at least I'd have an idea about what should be covered.

    After 56 years of playing, I'm pretty sure it would be a good idea to include a lot of ear training early on. Best from records, but anything that works. The goal would be to hear somebody play a wrong chord and know what it was and what it should have been.