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  1. #1

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    I've just started to take another batch of lessons, based on the guitar curriculum at Berkley, finally trying to really and truly sort out my theory chops to a useable level for blues/jazz playing. I've been playing for 35 years but I find that lessons at wide intervals will always jump start something in my playing.

    Around the same time I'd read an interview with Mark Knopfler where he said that he was thinking of taking some lessons. Which made me think, "If Knopfler is going to take some lesson, man I should be."

    And so I was talking to a couple of my old guitar teachers, both great players, about it, Kevin Boyea from Burlington, VT and Rick Beato, now in Atlanta but then at Ithaca College and I asked them the following question.

    If you could take a lesson with anyone, living or dead let's say, who would it be?

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Barry Harris

  4. #3

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    Wes Montgomery. I would just shut up and pay to watch him play for half an hour.

  5. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by grahambop
    Wes Montgomery. I would just shut up and pay to watch him play for half an hour.
    just to sit back and enjoy, or would you up close staring at his every move to learn as much as possible?

  6. #5

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    I'd study with Sylvius Leopold Weiss. If for nothing else but to hear the improvisations that were lost to time unpublished or unwritten in the day.

    David

  7. #6

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    Charlie Parker

  8. #7

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    I'm pretty sure I could have learned more about guitar and being a musician just having a beer with Jim Hall than I could in a formal lesson with anyone else.

    As for living musicians, I know a guy who just took a lesson with Peter Bernstein, and from what he told me, Peter is exactly what I like in a teacher. I bet I'd learn a lot.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758
    just to sit back and enjoy, or would you up close staring at his every move to learn as much as possible?
    Just to enjoy really, he is someone I would have loved to see. Somehow I doubt Wes would be that good at explaining what he did anyway.

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    I'm pretty sure I could have learned more about guitar and being a musician just having a beer with Jim Hall than I could in a formal lesson with anyone else.
    I did have a beer with Joe Pass once, but by that point I was already somewhat inebriated, so afterwards I could hardly remember anything we talked about!

  11. #10

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    Pope Gregory I, because I've always wanted to be a monk but I never got the chants.

  12. #11

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    Kleber Jorge.

    He is Sergio Mendes' guitarist.

    I had an opportunity to hear him up close playing Chega De Saudade and I thought his comping was absolutely perfect.

    Since I've been working on that, I'd like a lesson from him.

  13. #12

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    George Benson would be my choice.

  14. #13

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    Gerald Ross

  15. #14

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    I would say George Benson, or Joe Pass. Both equally revered for their playing ability and their interest in talking about the art of playing.

    I had a very good teacher in college in Atlanta, John Brown, who moved away, and unfortunately I've not been able to track him down. I wouldn't mind learning with him again.

    That said, I did take some lessons fairly recently with a good jazz guitarist who toured with Lou Rawls back in the 70's-80's. I have to say I didn't get as much out of it as I thought I would have.

    I admit I'm not a great pupil because I just don't like didactic stuff. And I'm old and set in my ways.

    Maybe if I had a (non-fatal) brain hemorrhage like Martino I could start over from scratch.
    Last edited by Doctor Jeff; 02-05-2019 at 06:27 PM.

  16. #15

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    For me it would be Johnny Smith - if he were still alive.

    I've always thought his playing and concepts were about as close to perfection as a human could get!

  17. #16

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    Monk

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    I'm pretty sure I could have learned more about guitar and being a musician just having a beer with Jim Hall than I could in a formal lesson with anyone else.
    Some of the best learning experiences I've had in music have come from just sitting and talking with musicians I admire. I did a week's camp in Italy five years ago with some heavyweight NYC musicians as the guest tutors. I and some other guitarists got two hours each afternoon to play tunes with drummer Greg Hutchinson. Some of the best times were just sitting chatting with him about his experiences, what he likes to hear in music and other musicians.

    I had a great time visiting Peter Leitch at his home a couple of years ago. We just chatted for two hours about music, life as a musician, pulling out CDs from his shelves. One of the best "lessons" I've had and there wasn't a guitar in the room.

    Once you have the technical aspects of playing music down (not that I do by the way!), the rest is just a question of aesthetics. That where the value is in taking a lesson with those top-level musicians.

    I've met most of my guitar heroes and am friends with some of them. At my fantasy coffee/lunch/music hang it would be great to have Sonny Rollins, Steve Swallow, Jim Hall, Jimmy Wyble, Sheila Jordan, Billy Strayhorn and Bud Powell around the table.

  19. #18

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    Living, Howard Alden. Dead, Tal Farlow.

  20. #19

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    Chris Flory, without a doubt.

  21. #20

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    Ed Bickert.

    Of active guitarists, John Pisano or Anthony Wilson. Gee, look what I found!

    I actually did attend an Eastman clinic with John Pisano, but Bill Frisell was in the store so it turned into a jam.
    (Edited 2/9)
    Last edited by KirkP; 02-09-2019 at 08:45 PM.

  22. #21
    Just because he hasn't been mentioned and he's 1A to Wes' 1 for me, Kenny Burrell.

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by KirkP
    Ed Bickert.

    Of living guitarists, John Pisano or Anthony Wilson.
    Did Ed Bickert die?

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59
    Did Ed Bickert die?
    No, just retired.

  25. #24

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    Coltrane

  26. #25

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    Besides Chris Flory, John Pizzarelli would top my list.

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    No, just retired.
    An important distinction (being retired myself that is.)

  28. #27

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    Yeah, I'm retired, but I'm not dead yet. I plan on many years of happy retirement.

  29. #28

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    Barney Kessel.

  30. #29

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    The most mysterious cat of them all, the one with "secret knowledge" many would kill for. Charles Parker.

  31. #30

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    Living: Tuck Andress
    Deceased: Les Paul
    Non-guitar: Miles Davis

  32. #31

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    I also thought about adding a non-guitarist, but I still haven’t narrowed it down to one.

    I laugh thinking how a lesson with Miles Davis might go.
    "Don't play the butter notes” in a gravelly whisper.

  33. #32

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil59
    Did Ed Bickert die?
    Oops, sorry! I knew he was living retired but I had my own senior moment.

  34. #33

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    Hands down Chris Flory here!!

    Will

  35. #34

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    I'd like a bit of time with Bruce Forman. I heard him explaining something once and it clicked right into place.

  36. #35

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    I’ve got a couple of the Bruce Forman masterclass videos and he is a very good educator, and a very likeable personality.

  37. #36

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    Coltrane, Miles, Jarrett, to name a few...

  38. #37

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    Larry Carlton.

    Never mind "could." I can, and do.

    truefire.com

  39. #38

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    Not to be a killjoy but I think there’s a good chance that the mind blowing world changing epiphany of secret knowledge and musical powers we collectively assume we’d be graced with during a private lesson with our jazz heroes would simply be to work endlessly on what we know to be “the fundamentals”.

  40. #39

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    Jimmy Bruno, with whom I have advanced my jazz skills more in three months than I ever have before.

  41. #40

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    Quote Originally Posted by whiskey02
    Not to be a killjoy but I think there’s a good chance that the mind blowing world changing epiphany of secret knowledge and musical powers we collectively assume we’d be graced with during a private lesson with our jazz heroes would simply be to work endlessly on what we know to be “the fundamentals”.
    Not trying to be rude but...

    I whole heartedly disagree with most of what you say

    Your statement is a reflection of your own somewhat limited and narrow experience

  42. #41

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    I may have a middle ground here: they can't give you info that will make you better right away, but they can tell you WHAT to practice that can be game changing

  43. #42

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    Some people may look for the ultimate answer on how to sucessfully play over a certain chord progression, some may value the experience of being in close proximity to a giant artist and have aconversation about whatever. Some people may value something in between

    If you think a lesson can only be about how to practice and play over certain chord progression, then your imagination is somewhat limited.

  44. #43

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    Quote Originally Posted by greveost
    your imagination is somewhat limited.
    not really called for imo

  45. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by joe2758
    not really called for imo

    It wasn't aimed at you, I was referring to my previous reply, just wanted to develop my answer a little.

  46. #45

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    Quote Originally Posted by greveost
    It wasn't aimed at you, I was referring to my previous reply, and the previous guy.
    oh okay because i also agreed with this

    "Some people may look for the ultimate answer on how to sucessfully play over a certain chord progression, some may value the experience of being in close proximity to a giant artist and have aconversation about whatever. Some people may value something in between"

  47. #46

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    Susan Sarandon

  48. #47

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    Quote Originally Posted by greveost
    Not trying to be rude but...

    I whole heartedly disagree with most of what you say

    Your statement is a reflection of your own somewhat limited and narrow experience
    I really only said one thing; how can you disagree with "most" of it whole heartedly?
    You know nothing of the extent or breadth of my experiences.
    You come off not as rude but flippant, by angrily guessing at my history while offering no insight or counter knowledge of your own. If you're going to post on the forum, and I hope that you do, try to make it a contribution, rather just elongating a thread.

  49. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by whiskey02
    Not to be a killjoy but I think there’s a good chance that the mind blowing world changing epiphany of secret knowledge and musical powers we collectively assume we’d be graced with during a private lesson with our jazz heroes would simply be to work endlessly on what we know to be “the fundamentals”.
    I think you're probably absolutely spot on.

  50. #49

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Neverisky
    Jimmy Bruno, with whom I have advanced my jazz skills more in three months than I ever have before.
    Ah, I forgot him. Sorry, Jim. Yes, could be useful although there's a lot in his vids already. But I think any name who is, or has been, known and popular would have something to impart to all of us.

    As a matter of interest, what did he tell you that helped? If it's not too embarrassing :-)
    Last edited by ragman1; 04-10-2019 at 07:44 AM.

  51. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by whiskey02
    I really only said one thing; how can you disagree with "most" of it whole heartedly?
    You know nothing of the extent or breadth of my experiences.

    I know that you assume that we collectively expect private lessons to be mind blowing world changing epiphany of secret knowledge and musical powers.


    I think to assume that, is telling me that your view on what a lesson can be, is somewhat limited. I think many of us, doesn't expect it to be just that, but instead a great experience, and an opportunity to interact with an artist we respect.


    And to assume that the artist will focus on fundamentals is to, to some degree, (and here I admit I assume) view a lesson as something purely about concrete tips and techniques, which again, tells me that your idea of what a lesson can be, is limited.


    Your comment did not come off as coming from someone with great experience, but yeah, maybe you have all the experience in the world. If so, I do apologize.



    Quote Originally Posted by whiskey02
    You come off not as rude but flippant, by angrily guessing at my history while offering no insight or counter knowledge of your own.

    I am not angry at all. Not even the slightest upset


    I offered an insight as I developed my thoughts in the other post I did right after the first post.