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  1. #1

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    Was he too lazy? Was he unmotivated and maybe "sour-faced"? He was maybe lifting the cost of the lessons? He has not been there at the appointment? You felt like he didnt know what to do with students?

    Gathering info about that.

    thanks,

    MrBlues

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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Was working full time, and the fall semester of my sophomore year at college made demands.

    It had nothing to do with him at all. He was by turns demanding and understanding, critical and patient -- had a really good feel for what I wanted to learn at the time. No BS about him, never missed a session, was very affordable, and nurtured my own songwriting even though it wasn't purely jazz but rather Steely Dan-sort of using jazz chords in a pop-rock context, played by a kid who hadn't yet learnt to swing.

  4. #3

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    I'm a teacher and students stop ALL THE TIME. It's seldom that it is the acutual teacher there is something wrong with. Often life gets in the way - jobs, kids, shift of personal hobbies, relationships, travelling.

    However I always ask if there is something lacking in my teaching when they stop. Only in one instance I was really sad about a student, because he never practiced and was really, really bad so I kind of scolded him. I think he was dyslexic and in hindsight I should have made his guitar lessons a safe space.

    teaching guitar is 80% about dealing with other people

    I have stopped lessons with about 4 teachers. The worst experience I had was a self occupied smartass, who spent most of the lessons on tuning the guitars and telling how great his musical life was going - he was pretty competent though. Others have been of minor reasons like money, conflict of taste and after 4 years with the same teacher it was time to move on.
    Last edited by yaclaus; 08-19-2016 at 05:05 AM.

  5. #4

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    Put me in the "life happens" category.

    Around 4 years or so ago, I thought I was ready to go. I signed up with a guy who was a comedian and a great guitarist who studied at some South American observatory.

    I lasted two lessons and could see his vision and methodology - and I embraced it.

    But, my elderly parents fell ill and that stopped that.

    I let him keep my month's payment for lessons and explained what happened. He seemed to take it well.

  6. #5

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    Because I left school in the soft South and went to university far away, up in the grim wilderness of the North (= Yorkshire).

    (I'm talking about my classical guitar teacher, I've never had any other teachers).

  7. #6

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    If the lessons weren't quite right in some fixable way, I would hope my students would give me feedback such as 'I really want to work on this', 'this isn't taking me in the direction I want' or 'this is too much information can we break it down to simpler tasks' etc... That can be hard to do sometimes.

    My belief is that every teacher has to be focussed on the person they are teaching.

    With jazz lessons, people can already play, so it's kind of standard for them to be infrequent. People can spend a month working through material. Others like to have a lesson every couple of weeks.

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    If the lessons weren't quite right in some fixable way, I would hope my students would give me feedback such as 'I really want to work on this', 'this isn't taking me in the direction I want' or 'this is too much information can we break it down to simpler tasks' etc... That can be hard to do sometimes.

    My belief is that every teacher has to be focussed on the person they are teaching.

    With jazz lessons, people can already play, so it's kind of standard for them to be infrequent. People can spend a month working through material. Others like to have a lesson every couple of weeks.
    This was something that I ran into when I took those 2 or 3 Jazz lessons.

    The instructor gave me around 30 chord shapes to learn and to me, weekly lessons were not enough time to make good progress. He told me he was set up for weekly lessons and could not tailor his schedule for me.

    That was a show stopper also. I forgot about that.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77

    My belief is that every teacher has to be focussed on the person they are teaching.

    With jazz lessons, people can already play, so it's kind of standard for them to be infrequent. People can spend a month working through material. Others like to have a lesson every couple of weeks.
    agree..I was very fortunate to be able to study with a master of guitar AND music..after an initial map was drawn of what I wanted to study and how to play it..I was given very detailed lessons in my direction..should ANY question I had about a lesson or just music in general come up he had the answer that I could understand..I was given "homework" in the form of harmonic analysis or chord related voice movement..strong emphasis on chord inversions-moving voices applied to diatonic harmony in ALL positions and KEYS and fingerings..bass movement and soprano movement and how chords can have several names at once..and into the extreme end of harmony..

    I studied with him for two years-1/2 hour every other wk..the reason I left..information overload..I still review some of the lessons from his many homework sheets he gave me..

    I am always thankful-thank you ted greene...

  10. #9

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    He died...

  11. #10

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    Because I wanted to go outside and play like the rest of the kids.

  12. #11

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    Three different teachers over the span of 50 years. Most recent was whenmy teacher laughed at me when I didn't have my lesson together. That was about 35yrs ago. I became aware, in addition of lacking aptitude/talent, of a disability of sorts. I can do a little better by ear. For quite a while I would try to hang with the really good guitarists, just jamming and stealing what I could. More often, I would also bribe many of them when possible to spend time with me. I'm sure I wore out my welcome with a lot of the accomplished guys back in my home town. Today, I'm a senior who still enjoys the hobby. Youtube has been a real help.

  13. #12

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    In my early '20s I studied with Chuck Wayne. I admired---even idolized---him, aping his sayings, etc.

    But I came to realize that for what I wanted to do (be a good jazz musician, as opposed to guitar player) getting as deep into the guitar as a thing or end in itself was not the way to go.

    I still love Chuck, and have such fond memories of hanging out with him at Gregory's (and sitting in once), but I do not regret my decision in the least. It worked out right for me...

  14. #13

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    Life got the in the way and I knew what I had to do

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by fasstrack
    In my early '20s I studied with Chuck Wayne. I admired---even idolized---him, aping his sayings, etc.

    But I came to realize that for what I wanted to do (be a good jazz musician, as opposed to guitar player) getting as deep into the guitar as a thing or end in itself was not the way to go.

    I still love Chuck, and have such fond memories of hanging out with him at Gregory's (and sitting in once), but I do not regret my decision in the least. It worked out right for me...
    That's an interesting thing to say... Would you say then that Chuck's teaching was heavily geared towards guitar playing?

  16. #15

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    In my early '20s I studied with Chuck Wayne. I admired---even idolized---him, aping his sayings, etc.

    But I came to realize that for what I wanted to do (be a good jazz musician, as opposed to guitar player) getting as deep into the guitar as a thing or end in itself was not the way to go.

    I still love Chuck, and have such fond memories of hanging out with him at Gregory's (and sitting in once), but I do not regret my decision in the least. It worked out right for me...
    I had the same issue with one teacher once... he was so interested in some smaller techical details - in effeciency, economy of certain technique that it - sort of - moved musical realization at the background...
    I think it's just that type of mind.. kind of 'engeneering' mind who wants to explore technical possibilities how it works and all..
    and more of an artistic mind that takes instrument only as medium...
    We all combine both just in different proportions

    TBH I think that a good way with any student at the beginning is a search for his own way of handling the instrument...

    It's not that I tell him that directly... with kids you cannot say it at all .. they need instructions... But I try during first lessons to find out what might be most efficient and comfortable for this person in concern of basic stuff like posture, wrist position etc.

  17. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    That's an interesting thing to say... Would you say then that Chuck's teaching was heavily geared towards guitar playing?
    Joe Puma used to say that Chuck lived in an 8-room guitar. That oughtta tell you.

    I think---great a guitar player as he was (one of the 'technique triumvirate' of himself, Van Eps, Johnny Smith)---his jazz playing suffered not a little from this obsession with the instrument itself. He stopped swinging, started rushing. I also would have to say (though I, with my modest technique, am the hardly one to qualify to comment on such an advanced technician) that his RH approach didn't lend itself to rhythmic articulation or accents. Everything went in one direction, like a swoop---no accents, including (sorry to say) the arpeggios he was famous for (they were things of beauty, though). Far lesser players technically swung more IMO.

    And that's where I wanted to be, a better musician than guitar player. That's the way it turned out, too.

    For the way I wanted to play Jimmy Raney helped me more. Eddie Diehl, even more (though we just played).

    What Chuck taught me (and countless others) about block chords, spread and split voicing, etc.---was wonderful. I use it, and am very grateful that he showed this to me. It helped a lot and he greatly influenced my chordal approach. Man, he just covered the waterfront on the instrument, one of the all-time greats and very deep. He also did a very credible job of arranging on String Fever. He was a rounded musician and autodidact who soaked up knowledge and practically breathed it.

    I adore Chuck for what he accomplished, and his commitment to being an artist, not a sell-out---the 1st person I'd (I was 20 when we met, and impressionable) ever met like that. It had quite an effect on me then. I was lucky to know him...
    Last edited by fasstrack; 09-16-2016 at 07:45 AM.

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by fasstrack
    Joe Puma used to say that Chuck lived in an 8-room guitar. That oughtta tell you.

    I think---great a guitar player as he was (one of the 'technique triumvirate' of himself, Van Eps, Johnny Smith)---his jazz playing suffered not a little from this obsession with the instrument itself. He stopped swinging, started rushing (boozing didn't help). I also would have to say (though I, with my modest technique, am the hardly one to qualify to comment on such an advanced technician) that his RH approach didn't lend itself to rhythmic articulation or accents. Every thing went in one direction, like a swoop---no accents. Far lesser players technically swung way more.

    And that's where I wanted to be, a better musician than guitar player. That's the way it turned out, too.

    For the way I wanted to play Jimmy Raney helped me way more. Eddie Diehl, even more so (though we just played).

    I adore Chuck for what he accomplished, and his commitment to being an artist---the 1st person I (I was 20 when we met, and impressionable) ever met like that, and it had quite an effect on me then. I was lucky to know him...
    Thanks for the detailed reply, interesting stuff....

    It sounds like your feelings about jazz guitar are similar to mine.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Thanks for the detailed reply, interesting stuff....

    It sounds like your feelings about jazz guitar are similar to mine.
    More my feelings about music, regardless of instrument.

    I repeat I adore Chuck. Just wanted to go a different way myself.

    Edit: I deleted the part about the boozing. In very bad taste to write that. I regret it, and wish it would disappear...
    Last edited by fasstrack; 09-16-2016 at 07:56 AM.

  20. #19

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    I left my young, hot blonde jazz guitar teacher because she touched me inappropriately.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveF
    I left my young, hot blonde jazz guitar teacher because she touched me inappropriately.
    Ha ha! Home run!

  22. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveF
    I left my young, hot blonde jazz guitar teacher because she touched me inappropriately.
    Can you give me her contact details? Does she do Skype?

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveF
    I left my young, hot blonde jazz guitar teacher because she touched me inappropriately.
    Did you try to play Hot For Teacher for her or something?

  24. #23

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    I went to this one guy. Kind of a legendary teacher around here (as much for his flyers as anything else). He was also a bit of an eccentric. Most of the time that was great. He was a really fun, and funny guy, and I really enjoyed hanging out with him. Unfortunately, our lessons became mostly hangout, and not so much lesson. And he'd occasionally do really weird stuff like lay down on the floor, or yell out the window at nobody in particular.

    I eventually stopped going to him for several reasons. I didn't want to feel like I was paying someone just to hang out, and then a couple of times, he'd show me stuff and I'd start asking about applications of it, and he'd say something to the effect of, "I just show you stuff. How you apply it is up to you." Fair enough, but maybe, you know, an example or something? Just to get me headed in the right direction. Or at least A direction?

    Other guys I've gone to for a few lessons, mostly because I wanted to learn something specific, and they were the go-to guys for that particular thing. Once I got the info I wanted, I moved on.

  25. #24

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    Can you give me her contact details? Does she do Skype?
    Skype? Man... is it really so bad?

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    Skype? Man... is it really so bad?
    Nah, he just want to be on a safe side.

  27. #26

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    Something's going on here... looks like everybody want to be on the safe side...

    In one of the threads nearby targuit described how to satisfy young blonde with playing Misty..

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jonah
    Skype? Man... is it really so bad?
    Ha Ha I didn't think of that, posted to quick. I'm a long way away in Australia is what I was thinking. And no it's not that bad. Really

  29. #28

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    My first guitar lesson was after I had been playing guitar for 9 years! It was before I began my Junior year at college, and I was getting ready to finally become a guitar major. It's a long story, but before I started my freshman year in college I came down with debilitating tendonitis in both arms...So I had to major in voice for a few years and then finally got back to guitar in my junior year (which was my 4th year lol). Anyways, the guitar teacher at the university had a fancy D.M.A. in guitar performance, and I started taking privates with him before I started my junior year and 1st year as an actual guitar major. The lessons were more of a "here's what you'll be expected to know as a junior level guitar major", and incidentally, I knew already at that point most of the basic technical stuff such as chords, scales, etc...up the neck. So he didn't really teach much of anything new, he just helped me kind of get organized as to what to have prepared for juries when those rolled around at the end of the semester. I stopped lessons with him when he got a better job somewhere else ;o) And then was given a new teacher, who again didn't really teach much of anything new, just kept me on track to be prepared for juries. At that stage in the game my guitar "teachers" were just handing me sheet music and saying "here learn this" and checking to make sure I knew my scales, which of course I did because I studied/played jazz for 4 years before becoming a guitar major in college.

    On another note, I have been teaching private guitar lessons for about 17 years now. Trying to make a living from teaching lessons can be very difficult. It can be very erratic with how many people you get, how often you get them and how long they stay, especially where I live where there are almost 20 other guitar teachers studios within 5 miles of where I teach.

    Just a little story from the other end of the perspective. I remember this guy who came to me a while back who was into jazz guitar. I was really excited because I generally almost never get people interested in jazz. For every 1 person who wants to learn jazz I have 100 people come through my door interested only in metal, country or pop. So this guy had been playing for many years and he came to a lesson. The first thing I noticed that was a glaring problem (after he played a little for me) was that he could barely play the major scale. He only solo'd in one position, and made multiple mistakes in that 1 position. I asked him if he could play the changes using other positions and he couldn't. So we spent the first lesson going over the major scale and the other positions. It was clear to me that his biggest problem was his lack of basic scale proficiency. The little sample of soloing he did for me was terrible to put it mildly. Other than not knowing more positions, there were plenty of other issues, but by far the biggest issue was that he didn't even know one box of the scale perfect. And this is a guy who apparently had been "playing jazz for years"...As I explained that the first thing we were going to work on was the basic scale patterns he got visibly irritated. He tried to tell me, paraphrasing, "well, I know the major scale, I need some help with the more advanced stuff." I explained that you can't just know the scale in theory. You have to "know" it with your hands to the point that you can play all the boxes fluidly, and that was the number 1 problem he had. He left seemingly very unsatisfied at my assessment, and never came back! I guess the moral of the story is: trust your teacher's advice (as long as you know they know their stuff and can actually play well!). It can be really hard to be objective about your own skill level and what you need to work on the most. You may think what's holding up your progress is one thing, and it could actually be something else entirely, something more fundamental.

  30. #29

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    At the time needed work NOW had some offers so focused on learning a many songs as i could to put several sets together.That i do better alone cause i know what i hear in my head and acute sensitivity to what people like or were willing to gut up off the money for.

  31. #30

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    I have had one private jazz guitar teacher and we reached a point (after 6 years) where basically I had learned what he had to teach me. We remained friends, jammed, etc., and I have great affection and respect for him. Let's see, that would have been about 1987 or so. About 20 some odd years after that he and I got together to jam. I was much better than I had been back when I was a student... and he handed my butt to me on a plate. 20 years on, he was much better too.

    You never catch up.

  32. #31

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cunamara
    You never catch up.
    ... you only hope you don't drop the torch ...