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  1. #1

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    Hi all,

    I've been thinking about doing video lessons online for some time, with a professional. Just wondering if there's anyone here that has done that sort of thing in the past and whether or not it's worth it? How were you going into the lessons, and what did you come away with?

    I'm not a beginner, but still have some ways to go, well where I'd like to be.. would love to have more direction and focus going forward. What should I know/have under my belt before going into such lessons? I'd want to be best prepared to get as much from it as possible.

    Thanks in advance!

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  3. #2

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    I don't know that it would help me, because I am three shades of hopeless. That said, I think it can be very beneficial to do a Skype with a player that you want some in depth time with for something. I don't think I would use Skype as a permanent solution for a teacher though. Personally, I would hunt down a local professional and work with them one on one. Then, maybe take an occasional Skype lesson with someone else because they fill a specific need.

    But, your mileage may vary.
    Jazz isn't dead. It just smells funny. FZ

  4. #3

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    I expect is depends upon the teacher and how they are prepared to work with you at whatever level you need. So you might look for specific and detailed reviews.

    In the past, I took one-on-one lessons with a well known fiddler/banjo player via Skype and it was an excellent experience and tremendous value. He was well prepared and comfortable with the technology. I've also done the video exchange thing on Artistworks on several instruments. Also a positive experience, but the exchange delay of up to two weeks was somewhat frustrating.
    Last edited by Michael Neverisky; 02-12-2019 at 10:10 PM.

  5. #4

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    p1p,
    By "video" lessons, do you mean "skype" type lessons, where you're talking and interacting with the teacher in real time, or watching a teacher "on video," and listening to the lesson and taking it from there? I think there are big differences between the media, and I've done both, but I'm not sure which you mean ....

    Marc

  6. #5

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    Absolutely, I have good success teaching using Skype/FaceTime.

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by marcwhy View Post
    p1p,
    By "video" lessons, do you mean "skype" type lessons, where you're talking and interacting with the teacher in real time, or watching a teacher "on video," and listening to the lesson and taking it from there? I think there are big differences between the media, and I've done both, but I'm not sure which you mean ....

    Marc

    Skype lessons, sorry

  8. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by vintagelove View Post
    Absolutely, I have good success teaching using Skype/FaceTime.
    Yes, me too. It's not for beginners, but I've taught jazz and western swing on Skype and on appear.in, with success. The only drawback is that playing with the student is not possible due to latency, but that can be worked round using prepared backing tracks.
    Spiderman needs no fancy suit or gadgets plus he's a jazz guitar fan

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by p1p View Post
    Skype lessons, sorry
    OK, cool, thanks.

    As someone mentioned above, if you can find a great, local teacher, start there first. If not, then look around online. Depending on your needs, you will benefit from different teachers; are you learning "guitar," or "Jazz," or "improv," or "chord melodies," or what?

    I've done some "jazz schools" (i.e., the original Jimmy Bruno program, etc.) and Mike's Master Class stuff (which have been excellent!), and have taken "skype" lessons with several great players most here would recognize. Probably my favorite, though, has been Chris Crocco; although he's known for his connection to George Garzone and his "style" of playing, he is incredibly thorough, and has huge ears to help determine what you need to learn! Highly recommended!

    Let us know who you pick!

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by marcwhy View Post
    OK, cool, thanks.

    As someone mentioned above, if you can find a great, local teacher, start there first. If not, then look around online. Depending on your needs, you will benefit from different teachers; are you learning "guitar," or "Jazz," or "improv," or "chord melodies," or what?

    I've done some "jazz schools" (i.e., the original Jimmy Bruno program, etc.) and Mike's Master Class stuff (which have been excellent!), and have taken "skype" lessons with several great players most here would recognize. Probably my favorite, though, has been Chris Crocco; although he's known for his connection to George Garzone and his "style" of playing, he is incredibly thorough, and has huge ears to help determine what you need to learn! Highly recommended!

    Let us know who you pick!
    Cheers, I will do. Looking to work on improvisation mostly. Will reply again later.

  11. #10
    I think it also depends on what you need as a student. Sometimes the whole vibe/inspiration of a teacher on a personal level is important and makes for great motivation and results. But skype lessons can be great too, and open up a tremendous roster of players/teachers for you! I think most teachers offering skype lessons have tryout or one time lessons, so you can always give it a try.

  12. #11

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    on skype can you play with the teacher, or is there still a lag? I haven't used skype in 10 years
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  13. #12

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    Mix in the video "one-way" lessons with live teacher sessions every 4-6 weeks, as needed.

  14. #13

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    Sorry for promo - mods feel free to delete if this isn't kosher.

    I've been teaching online for a while now. Though the obvious downside of not getting to just sit in a room and play together, I think that 'negative' can be balanced by the positive of being able to scan the whole globe for somebody who is a good fit for yeah and can provide the right direction. Some places, geographically, also don't have much of a music scene going on. Although in fairness one of my best students lived in NYC!

    Some of the players I've taught online:

    TJ

    Will (on the left)

    Aaron

    Personally, I think that for 'instruction' while playing with your teacher is really invaluable, having a clear practice routine and set of tasks to accomplish is extremely important too, and I've found that's something that's lacking from a lot of instruction. Sharing ideas and jamming is awesome, but at the end of the day, there needs to be skill building processes to...build skills.

    just my two cents!
    Oh, hi - if interested, I post a lot of playing/practice clips at www.instagram.com/JakeEstner

  15. #14
    I’m not aware of any locals that I want to learn from, unfortunately; otherwise I’d go that route. Luckily with internet speeds these days, it isn’t hard to find someone anywhere really..so many more options.

    I have a good idea of what it is I need to do to improve, and up for the hard work. At the same time, part of me thinks that some feedback or guidance could get me there that much quicker? Maybe see new ways of thinking of things? I’m not sure, that’s why I’m gathering opinions here.

    The price of lessons is also a factor for me, otherwise it wouldn’t be such a big deal, and I’d just go for it. I’d probably look to have and record 4-10 hours working with someone, trying to gather enough information for a long time going forward.

    Thanks again guys.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by p1p View Post
    I have a good idea of what it is I need to do to improve, and up for the hard work. At the same time, part of me thinks that some feedback or guidance could get me there that much quicker? Maybe see new ways of thinking of things? I’m not sure, that’s why I’m gathering opinions here.
    I think if you find the right person for your level and goals, then they can open up quite a lot.

    One thing that I really hate hearing from students or prospective students is "I guess that'll just come with practice" because sure, of course, at least in theory, but the idea is that a teacher (Well, the right teacher for the context) helps the student pace things, know when to move on, know when to dig in a little harder to something, know what to prioritize and what specific processes to recommend for solving what specific problems.

    I'm not a big fan of 'just transcribe a lot and practice sight reading and scales' kind of thing...not that I think it doesn't work, just because I don't think it's the most efficient approach.

    There's also the issue that there are the known unknowns and unknown-unknowns. Meaning, there's the stuff that's on your list to learn already, and there's the stuff you don't yet know that you could or "should" be learning.
    Oh, hi - if interested, I post a lot of playing/practice clips at www.instagram.com/JakeEstner

  17. #16

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    My daughter started piano with a 20-year-old teacher. I asked her if she were taking lessons in college, and she replied, "No, there's no reason to. I pretty much know everything already. "

  18. #17

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    I've had hundreds of hours of Skype lessons. I've really advanced to the point I want to perform some of the pieces I've learned but I've never played in the presence of real people and I can't find any venues that will pay for a Skype performance.

  19. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarcoSolo View Post
    I've had hundreds of hours of Skype lessons. I've really advanced to the point I want to perform some of the pieces I've learned but I've never played in the presence of real people and I can't find any venues that will pay for a Skype performance.
    If you have an old folks home in your area, I’m sure they’d be very appreciative if you stopped by and played for them. It would be a great experience for both of you.

  20. #19
    Thanks for the replies all.

    Because lessons can go on indefinitely - and my wallet certainly cannot - what would be a minimum amount of time to spend with someone to get what you'd want from them? I don't need to fully practice in real time or anything, but I would have some written questions in how to approach this or that sort of thing.. It would mean a lot to me, coming from a professional, just the way they might think about the same sort of things. Anyway, I was thinking 3-4 hours to start, and if it goes well, 10-12 hours?

    Opinions much appreciated

  21. #20

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    Well, that's the "it depends" sort of question! It depends on what you're trying to learn, from whom, and how much time can you put into the material?? One lesson could give you two months' worth of practicing (or more!), and then the next lesson will give you even more!

    The beauty of our technology is: if you know a player with whom you'd like to study, just email him/her and get started! What are you waiting for? Go for it!

  22. #21

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    44+ free lessons and counting on good music
    If you can distinguish between rehearsing and practicing...you're better than half way there!