Reply to Thread Bookmark Thread
Posts 1 to 17 of 17
  1. #1

    User Info Menu

    This shouldn't be difficult, but it is somehow...

    I'm in the mecca of the jazz guitar universe, but I'm having a hard time finding a teacher. Partially, this is my fault because I have certain things in mind:

    1. I hope he's a good player and teacher. Organized, thoughtful and intelligent with a good method. I'm not new to the guitar or music theory, etc. (but I am to jazz) so it's hard for me to take lessons with these 18-year-old kids.

    There may be plenty of folks who fit the above, but then we run into,

    2. Price. I just can't afford $100 (or even more) per lesson, which seems to be the going rate for qualified guys here. I certainly would want to do weekly lessons, but at that rate, it's not possible. Not even $75.

    Trouble is, all the craigslist guys I have found for $25-50 an hour don't come close to No. 1 above. You get what you pay for...

    I know I can probably find something with skyped lessons in that price range, but it ain't as good, man. and it defeats the whole being in NYC thing.

    I wouldn't mind if someone would do bi-weekly lessons if they were good and knew how to keep me well occupied for two weeks, but I haven't found him or her yet.

    Please don't flame me with how good teaching is worth it. I know! And I'm not complaining or begrudging the price these teachers can command. I just can't swing it.

    Anyway, I just thought I'd put myself out there if anyone knew of anyone I can contact.

    Thank you.

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

    User Info Menu

    For the price range you desire why don't you got talk to the heads of the guitar department as some of the music schools in NYC, explain your situation. They can probably recommend some good students that teach. Maybe one of the non-big name teachers at the school who teaches.

    When I was in music school some of the best teachers were people I never heard of before, working pro's who were good teachers.
    No, I'm not going to give you the answer to your question. I don't want to deny you the pleasure you'll receive when you figure it out yourself. -- Bill Evans talking to his brother.

  4. #3
    I might let go of the once-per-week restriction . I don't know that quantity-vs-quality of lessons is the exchange you want to make. Put what you think you can afford - weekly - into the cookie jar and take a lesson periodically. Once or twice a month is plenty for many people, especially in something like jazz. The more advanced the instruction/assignments generally, the less often instruction is actually needed/ beneficial.

  5. #4

    User Info Menu

    Good thoughts guys. Thanks.

    I have been playing and teaching all my life. Once a week is always the standard. Why would it be different for jazz?

  6. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by mistyguy View Post
    Good thoughts guys. Thanks.

    I have been playing and teaching all my life. Once a week is always the standard. Why would it be different for jazz?
    The more difficult the material you're working on, the more time needed? "Work on this for a month and get back to me" probably doesn't fly with beginner students, but it's more common practice for advanced studies.

  7. #6

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mistyguy View Post
    Good thoughts guys. Thanks.

    I have been playing and teaching all my life. Once a week is always the standard. Why would it be different for jazz?
    The jazz musicians gigging jazz musicians dont have a steady schedule due to sporadic nature of work, so I dont think its realistic to keep the same schedule on a weekly basis. Its a very different world from classical, I know it from experience. The best way is to treat it like an artist doing a clinic. You take what you can until the next opportunity. Flexibility is the key

  8. #7

    User Info Menu

    What part of NYC?

    Are you willing to ride to Queens?


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    If you can distinguish between rehearsing and practicing...you're better than half way there!

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    I think this is tall order. From what I've seen the going rate for a good teacher for an intermediate to advanced student in NYC starts at about $75. For $50, it's not easy to even to find someone good for a beginner (I pay $60 for my kid's clarinet lessons).

    A couple of guys here: Guitar Archives - New York Jazz Workshop

    list lower rates, and might be worth checking out. TBH, though, it might be more bang for the buck to have less frequent lessons with someone like Juris (who is a phenomenal teacher by many accounts). Another idea might be to go to a few jam sessions, see if you hear anybody you like and approach them about lessons.

    John

  10. #9
    If you are disciplined, perhaps you could work your way thru one of the many excellent book/courses, like Mick Goodrick's, and then hire a teacher once in a while to check your progress. Many teachers will work through a book anyway since it's a well-thought out program, rather than just "Here learn this. Now learn that."

    Yes, NYC is great place for jazz, with many talented musicians/teachers and some wonderful open jam sessions. But those musicians have to pay their bills and everyone knows the going rate. It's just a reality: Movies cost $12, a slice costs $3 and a ticket to "Hamilton" costs more than Miles Davis's Lamborghini.

    But living in NYC doesn't necessarily mean you'll play any better than a well-trained player in Kalamazoo. For a jazz beginner, I'm not sure taking one-on-one lessons in a loft in Soho is qualitatively better than using Skype. I'd say the biggest benefits of living in a city with so many jazz players will come when you can hang with them in an ensemble.

  11. #10

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by TommyCorsica2 View Post
    If you are disciplined, perhaps you could work your way thru one of the many excellent book/courses, like Mick Goodrick's, and then hire a teacher once in a while to check your progress. Many teachers will work through a book anyway since it's a well-thought out program, rather than just "Here learn this. Now learn that."

    Yes, NYC is great place for jazz, with many talented musicians/teachers and some wonderful open jam sessions. But those musicians have to pay their bills and everyone knows the going rate. It's just a reality: Movies cost $12, a slice costs $3 and a ticket to "Hamilton" costs more than Miles Davis's Lamborghini.

    But living in NYC doesn't necessarily mean you'll play any better than a well-trained player in Kalamazoo. For a jazz beginner, I'm not sure taking one-on-one lessons in a loft in Soho is qualitatively better than using Skype. I'd say the biggest benefits of living in a city with so many jazz players will come when you can hang with them in an ensemble.

    All good points. Although, I always thought Kalamazoo was a hip town, according to Glen Miller, anyway...

    Usually, though, you can jam with your teacher. That doesn't work so well with skype.

    I can be disciplined, and I'd have no trouble working through some method, but there is so much to cover! It's nice to have an experienced hand say, "don't worry about that right now, just do this for a while...;"

    I've had someone contact me, so hopefully this may work out. Fingers crossed!

    And I still can't believe the price of a slice. It's robbery, I tell you.

  12. #11

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by TommyCorsica2 View Post
    If you are disciplined, perhaps you could work your way thru one of the many excellent book/courses, like Mick Goodrick's, and then hire a teacher once in a while to check your progress. Many teachers will work through a book anyway since it's a well-thought out program, rather than just "Here learn this. Now learn that."

    Yes, NYC is great place for jazz, with many talented musicians/teachers and some wonderful open jam sessions. But those musicians have to pay their bills and everyone knows the going rate. It's just a reality: Movies cost $12, a slice costs $3 and a ticket to "Hamilton" costs more than Miles Davis's Lamborghini.

    But living in NYC doesn't necessarily mean you'll play any better than a well-trained player in Kalamazoo. For a jazz beginner, I'm not sure taking one-on-one lessons in a loft in Soho is qualitatively better than using Skype. I'd say the biggest benefits of living in a city with so many jazz players will come when you can hang with them in an ensemble.




    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  13. #12

    User Info Menu

    I would offer myself as a skype teacher but since you're looking for someone in NY I can recommend Assaf Kehati.
    Assaf Kehati - Jazz Guitarist and Composer

  14. #13

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by oriv View Post
    I would offer myself as a skype teacher but since you're looking for someone in NY I can recommend Assaf Kehati.
    Assaf Kehati - Jazz Guitarist and Composer
    Do you think a guy like that would give lessons for less than $75? I highly doubt it man! Great player of course.

  15. #14
    Hey Mistyguy - Also check out NYJazz Academy, led by Javier Arau.
    It's also not free, but they'll put you in an ensemble led by a pro player.
    You'd still have to learn your building blocks somehow, but the ensembles are good for working out stuff on actual songs.
    And the teachers/leaders are amazing resources for all your questions about trading fours, staying in form, motunos, and what key is "two fingers down."

  16. #15

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by mistyguy View Post
    All good points. Although, I always thought Kalamazoo was a hip town, according to Glen Miller, anyway...

    Usually, though, you can jam with your teacher. That doesn't work so well with skype.

    I can be disciplined, and I'd have no trouble working through some method, but there is so much to cover! It's nice to have an experienced hand say, "don't worry about that right now, just do this for a while...;"

    I've had someone contact me, so hopefully this may work out. Fingers crossed!

    And I still can't believe the price of a slice. It's robbery, I tell you.
    Not only that, it's illegal. It's written into City ordinances that the price of a slice must equal the price of a subway ride.

    John

  17. #16

    User Info Menu

    Great Deals with Great Folks: max52 (Guild-Benedetto Artist Award); prickards (Ribbecke GC Halfling); Cincy2 (Comins Concert)

  18. #17

    User Info Menu

    PM me please. I've got some excellent recommendations.
    David