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  1. #1

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    Guys, I know this may not be the place to ask for advice, but I need it regarding teaching privately vs. publicly. As I have said earlier, I got the opportunity to go and study Subcontinintal Hindustani music at National Center for the Arts in Lahore, Pakistan, where I have all kinds of family and friends. Unfortunately the violence has become so bad there that going there is out of the question. I had to cancel the entire process.

    With that said, I have already given my notice to the Montessori school where I teach guitar ensemble and piano class, so going back to teach there is out of the question. However, I have a my piano and guitar teaching certificate from MNTA, the national music teacher's assosiaction which means I can teach any where in the country at music academies and private lessons. I already have two private guitar students I've been working with and have taught privately before My question is this:

    What can I expect from completely teaching privately? I know I would get paid $36 an hour (the average hour-long lesson rate here in Nevada) meaning if I would get a lot more cash per hour than I would teaching in an elementary school, meaning I would have all the time in the world to practice and even take musicology courses online. Is teaching completely privately fun? Is it less stressful than teaching/running classes? I don't know because I've only taught part-time privately (max three private students) while I was teaching at the elementary school.

    What are your thoughts? MNTA is already willing to hook me up with a music school in the north part of town where I am garaunteed three students right away. I know I shouldn't be asking for career advice, but I'm curious to hear from ANYONE'S experience with teaching privately

    Thanks!

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  3. #2

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    I only teach privately. I really enjoy working one on one. This way I can fully address any issues that a student displays. Not so sure I could handle classroom teaching.
    Cancellations and re-schedules can be an issue but, for 8 years, I've managed to survive.


    Best of luck,
    Ron

  4. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by RonD
    I only teach privately. I really enjoy working one on one. This way I can fully address any issues that a student displays. Not so sure I could handle classroom teaching.
    Cancellations and re-schedules can be an issue but, for 8 years, I've managed to survive.


    Best of luck,
    Ron

    Is the pay good? I was told I could easily make $25-30k/per with only six or seven students/hours a week. That would REALLY help my my personal music studies by giving me time

  5. #4

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    Teaching from home or your own studio is the most lucrative. All the money is yours. The only issue is volume of students.
    Most of my work is through a local music school and yes, $25-$30 is the norm.
    I currently have 55 students.

    Cheers, Ron

  6. #5

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    As many of you know, I am a public high school teacher and a private guitar instructor. No advice to give really, just my shared experience for you or anyone who considers either or both of these paths.

    Public school teaching is a calling. You have to love it to do it well--and it's not easy. You're not going to get the gains out of students that you can 1 on 1, that's just a fact. But there's also a sense of fufillment--particularly in serving in a low-income or underserved community. Sharing the arts, something these students are often not exposed to, is a labor of love, and the rewards can be great (on a spiritual level, not necessarily monetarily!)

    However, while public school teachers don't make a ton of money in the grand scheme, I am paid well enough to own a home, have some nice guitars, and I'll be able to provide for my family when my wife and I decide to start one. It's also nice to know I'll be paid the same amount every day of every week no matter how many students show up.

    Private teaching is a different gig. Money is a lot less certain, as you never really know how many students you'll be carrying on any given month. People come and go. You get all types--spoiled brats whose parents are paying for lessons they don't really want--the occasional really driven student who you just love to see every week, adults and second-chancers who can be fun or frustrating (and sometimes both) WHen private teaching is good, it's great. When it's bad, the hour with the student can seem like an eternity. WHile I have a lot of fun teaching privately and I really enjoy the extra cash I make, it is far from as fulfilling as my day job. Others might feel differently.

  7. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzyteach65
    I'm curious to hear from ANYONE'S experience with teaching privately
    OK, 'anyone' is a good description of me: I used to give private guitar lessons in England decades ago and I worked for years as an EFL teacher here in Spain. So I can say, a) the money's fine (and gratifyingly immediate); b) the conditions are good; c) you need to keep your eye out constantly for possibilities of new classes, if you don't, you wake up one day and find they've all dried up; d) your career prospects are terrible, private teaching looks like a hole on your curriculum (sorry, resume), and even if you get a position with some kind of managerial responsibilities, you're unlikely to get an adequate financial reward.

    If you've got that sort of qualification, I'd have thought some kind of hybrid arrangement was your best bet - so many hours a month in a public institution for security (maybe even social security) and curriculum-building, and so many hours with your own students to get a little icing on your cake. I don't know about the US but, in Britain, schools including music schools use peripatetic (i.e., non-payroll) music teachers for most instrument teaching. That might be a way to get your foot in the door, and it's a good foundation for your private work, anyway.

  8. #7

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    I've taught in a public college (English) and privately as a guitar instructor. I prefer teaching privately. The college gig felt to me too much like an office job, and I feel that would be magnified in a public school setting. I prefer the one-on-one teaching experience over the group teaching experience.

    As far as having all the time in the world to practice etc, you'll be busy once you start carrying a full load. The hours are definitely different. Peak hours for me during the week are from about 3pm to 9/10pm. Nothing much going on in the mornings or early afternoons so I pickup a lunch gig or two. Weekends are free to play gigs and not grade papers or do administrative school work. As a private teacher, I never go to meetings. Working as a public school teacher, you'll have to go to meetings.

    It's plenty to think about. Best of luck.

  9. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by mr. beaumont
    As many of you know, I am a public high school teacher and a private guitar instructor. No advice to give really, just my shared experience for you or anyone who considers either or both of these paths.

    Public school teaching is a calling. You have to love it to do it well--and it's not easy. You're not going to get the gains out of students that you can 1 on 1, that's just a fact. But there's also a sense of fufillment--particularly in serving in a low-income or underserved community. Sharing the arts, something these students are often not exposed to, is a labor of love, and the rewards can be great (on a spiritual level, not necessarily monetarily!)

    However, while public school teachers don't make a ton of money in the grand scheme, I am paid well enough to own a home, have some nice guitars, and I'll be able to provide for my family when my wife and I decide to start one. It's also nice to know I'll be paid the same amount every day of every week no matter how many students show up.

    Private teaching is a different gig. Money is a lot less certain, as you never really know how many students you'll be carrying on any given month. People come and go. You get all types--spoiled brats whose parents are paying for lessons they don't really want--the occasional really driven student who you just love to see every week, adults and second-chancers who can be fun or frustrating (and sometimes both) WHen private teaching is good, it's great. When it's bad, the hour with the student can seem like an eternity. WHile I have a lot of fun teaching privately and I really enjoy the extra cash I make, it is far from as fulfilling as my day job. Others might feel differently.
    Exactly my point. I have actually run countless free clinics here and have worked with underpriveleged youth. I actually called the state a year ago trying to start a non-profit jazz school here, and am still thinking about it b/c Vernell Brown Jr. (plays with Kenny Garret and worked with Miles) works in a program that helps bring jazz to poor kids rather than violence. I'm trying to work with him on that. However rewarding it is, the public school system is terrible here, and in fact there is really only one high school in town where one can learn jazz. I feel (as I always say here) that jazz and American music should be part of the school cirriculum. If jazz guitar, ensemble, arranging, imrpov etc were taught in schools, COUNT ME IN, but teaching anything other than guitar, piano, theory and ensemble would be tough. Running an orchestra is tough, as is a marching band. It wouldn't be "for me."

    I also just need time to work out my true calling, my musicology degree online. That way I can still study other cultures' music and apply for gov grants to research. Meanwhile being a private teacher and working with MNTA means I have a chance to write instructional books

  10. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stackabones
    I've taught in a public college (English) and privately as a guitar instructor. I prefer teaching privately. The college gig felt to me too much like an office job, and I feel that would be magnified in a public school setting. I prefer the one-on-one teaching experience over the group teaching experience.

    As far as having all the time in the world to practice etc, you'll be busy once you start carrying a full load. The hours are definitely different. Peak hours for me during the week are from about 3pm to 9/10pm. Nothing much going on in the mornings or early afternoons so I pickup a lunch gig or two. Weekends are free to play gigs and not grade papers or do administrative school work. As a private teacher, I never go to meetings. Working as a public school teacher, you'll have to go to meetings.

    It's plenty to think about. Best of luck.

    My problem with teaching in school in any capactiy is just that, it can feel like a desk job. Going into music whether it be through studying jazz performance when I was at UNT or even gigging and teaching lessons/clinics is one reason I stuck with music. I couldn't do anything else.

  11. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnRoss
    OK, 'anyone' is a good description of me: I used to give private guitar lessons in England decades ago and I worked for years as an EFL teacher here in Spain. So I can say, a) the money's fine (and gratifyingly immediate); b) the conditions are good; c) you need to keep your eye out constantly for possibilities of new classes, if you don't, you wake up one day and find they've all dried up; d) your career prospects are terrible, private teaching looks like a hole on your curriculum (sorry, resume), and even if you get a position with some kind of managerial responsibilities, you're unlikely to get an adequate financial reward.

    If you've got that sort of qualification, I'd have thought some kind of hybrid arrangement was your best bet - so many hours a month in a public institution for security (maybe even social security) and curriculum-building, and so many hours with your own students to get a little icing on your cake. I don't know about the US but, in Britain, schools including music schools use peripatetic (i.e., non-payroll) music teachers for most instrument teaching. That might be a way to get your foot in the door, and it's a good foundation for your private work, anyway.
    What do you mean by my career prospects being terrible?

  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzyteach65
    What do you mean by my career prospects being terrible?
    No, no, not 'Jazzteach65's career prospects', but 'your' as in 'one's' career prospects are terrible in private teaching. Because a) as I said, it doesn't really count on your resume, and b) it doesn't have the hierarchical organization that teaching in public institutes has. In a public teaching environment i) you've always got another rung on the ladder to move up, ii) even if you don't, you get seniority and bonuses and whatnot just for having worked x years, and iii) there are grants and things available, even paid sabbaticals, to enable you to get further qualifications. None of those things works in private teaching.

  13. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnRoss
    No, no, not 'Jazzteach65's career prospects', but 'your' as in 'one's' career prospects are terrible in private teaching. Because a) as I said, it doesn't really count on your resume, and b) it doesn't have the hierarchical organization that teaching in public institutes has. In a public teaching environment i) you've always got another rung on the ladder to move up, ii) even if you don't, you get seniority and bonuses and whatnot just for having worked x years, and iii) there are grants and things available, even paid sabbaticals, to enable you to get further qualifications. None of those things works in private teaching.
    so are you saying/do you think that teaching in a public school is better than teaching privately?

  14. #13

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    Things to think about:
    It's highly unlikely that you will be able to make a living teaching jazz guitar. When carrying 30 to 40 students, I've never had more than 2 or 3 that were interested in jazz.

    Most people coming into guitar lessons want to play songs they hear on the radio. Most teenage boys want to play hard rock or metal. Teeenage girls want to play Taylor Swift songs. Middle aged men want to play the classic rock of their lost youth. Are you willing and prepared to teach these things?

    As was pointed out in an earlier post, prime teaching hours are 3 PM to 9 PM, in other words after school and after work.

    If you want to teach jazz, you need to build a local reputation as a jazz player who also teaches, by gigging as much as possible. The better known you are will translate into more students seeking you out for jazz lessons. Otherwise, you will need to be conversant with a variety of styles in order help the variety of lesson requests you'll receive.

    The main difference between an academic situation and a private situation is this: In a classroom, there is a curriculum that has to be followed and the students are there whether they want to learn or not. In private lessons, students are there because they want to be but they are also paying you to teach them what they want to learn not what you want to teach.

    Regards,
    monk
    Last edited by monk; 12-15-2010 at 03:32 PM.

  15. #14

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    I've noticed that when a student says that he wants to play jazz that it just basically means he wants to play better. Most don't listen to jazz, but they know that jazz musicians are supposed to be the cream of the crop. So they think that if they learn jazz, then they'll be a better player.

    I usually ask them what they've been listening to jazz-wise and get a blank stare. I suggest various artists and tell them to come back to me when something clicks or for more suggestions. In the meantime, we go back to learning Guitar Hero songs.

  16. #15

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    Guys, I have no problem whatsoever teaching rock, folk ect. I think it's safe to say that all of us teachers at one point or another are asked to teach songs and "not-our-forte" area. I'm just saying that teaching jazz is fun, just as teaching all kinds of music! I also teach piano and can sight-read fairly well, wich means I'm not just a private jazz guitar instructor, but teaching students about jazz ALWAYS helps thier improv. One of two private guitar students is a shred-head. I spent a month with him on making lines from chord tones, 7ths, triplets, chromatics ect and it helped his soloing immensly. He wasn't just a "pentatonic and diminished sweep-tapper" anymore. He has a broader conception of the possibilities.

  17. #16

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    Oh, yeah, I know what you're saying. Even though I rarely teach strictly jazz guitar, some aspects do come up. For example, I'm teaching one of my students a chord-melody solo of Yesterday. And this time of year I show plenty of students CMs of Silent Night.

    One student wanted to learn what he called "finger wagging" music, so taught him a I-vi-ii-V and he went to town on it!

  18. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jazzyteach65
    so are you saying/do you think that teaching in a public school is better than teaching privately?
    Not quite, I'm saying it has more future. Public schools have career structures, private teaching doesn't. Suppose you get yourself set up teaching privately so you have enough students, you're content, you have what you consider is an adequate income, and so on. So far, OK, great. But that's it, that's as good as it gets. The most progress you are likely to make in that line is a position in a private music school or studio as Director of Studies or something, which in practice means a lot more work for almost exactly the same money.

    Now, if in fact you're teaching to supplement your income, and gigging, for example, is your real main concern, that may not matter. But if you consider teaching to be your core activity, sooner or later, it'll be unsatisfactory. You'll want more income, a higher position, whatever. I know what it's like to be forty-something living a thirty-year-old's life, it feels wrong, like wearing clothes that are the wrong age for you, and it makes you unhappy, bitter. So if your plan is to do this for a few years and get qualified for bigger and better things at the same time, yes, it's certainly an option. Any longer, I'd think at least twice. And even if it's only for a few years, I repeat that it will count as a big, fat, blank on your resume which you will probably need to make up for in some way.

  19. #18

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    I like both, but I think its way more work to teach privately. especially of you go to the student's house.

    I'm young, single, and have no kids, teaching privately allows me to take any gig at any time that I want to take, and the money (we charge $55 an hour in Seattle) allows me to turn down any gig I don't want to do.

    It's a lot of work and I get at least 4 voicemails a day (I too have 50+ students).

    The best thing about teaching privately for me is that I get way better at my instruments through accompanying students, writing arrangements, etc... not only that but after 6 years of full time teaching, I have managed to save a big chunk of money for my future. and I;ve gotten some extremely talented young people who really make my job fun.

    I recommend it if you love music and don't have a family to support.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnRoss
    Not quite, I'm saying it has more future. Public schools have career structures, private teaching doesn't. Suppose you get yourself set up teaching privately so you have enough students, you're content, you have what you consider is an adequate income, and so on. So far, OK, great. But that's it, that's as good as it gets. The most progress you are likely to make in that line is a position in a private music school or studio as Director of Studies or something, which in practice means a lot more work for almost exactly the same money.

    Now, if in fact you're teaching to supplement your income, and gigging, for example, is your real main concern, that may not matter. But if you consider teaching to be your core activity, sooner or later, it'll be unsatisfactory. You'll want more income, a higher position, whatever. I know what it's like to be forty-something living a thirty-year-old's life, it feels wrong, like wearing clothes that are the wrong age for you, and it makes you unhappy, bitter. So if your plan is to do this for a few years and get qualified for bigger and better things at the same time, yes, it's certainly an option. Any longer, I'd think at least twice. And even if it's only for a few years, I repeat that it will count as a big, fat, blank on your resume which you will probably need to make up for in some way.

    This really helps. My intention is not to be a private teacher forever. I am only 29, single and with no kids. That alone is something I'd like to maintain. My intention is just to teach privately so I can either
    1. Attain more credentials, perhaps take Orff certification classes, take online courses in musicology to further my education or to ultimately wait until Pakistan becomes less violent to where I can go back (I was there three years ago teaching at a school) oir save up for Prasanna's school in India ($7,000) My real dream has always been to go back to the land of my father, Pakistan to study the music and teach there, but something fucked up is ALWAYS happening over there.

  21. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by monk
    Things to think about:
    It's highly unlikely that you will be able to make a living teaching jazz guitar. When carrying 30 to 40 students, I've never had more than 2 or 3 that were interested in jazz.

    Most people coming into guitar lessons want to play songs they hear on the radio. Most teenage boys want to play hard rock or metal. Teeenage girls want to play Taylor Swift songs. Middle aged men want to play the classic rock of their lost youth. Are you willing and prepared to teach these things?

    As was pointed out in an earlier post, prime teaching hours are 3 PM to 9 PM, in other words after school and after work.

    If you want to teach jazz, you need to build a local reputation as a jazz player who also teaches, by gigging as much as possible. The better known you are will translate into more students seeking you out for jazz lessons. Otherwise, you will need to be conversant with a variety of styles in order help the variety of lesson requests you'll receive.

    The main difference between an academic situation and a private situation is this: In a classroom, there is a curriculum that has to be followed and the students are there whether they want to learn or not. In private lessons, students are there because they want to be but they are also paying you to teach them what they want to learn not what you want to teach.

    Regards,
    monk
    This is my experience also. I keep about 15 or so students over a couple of nights per week. One thing that can really assist in getting/keeping more students is if you are also willing to teach bass. In my area, there is only one other bass teacher, and he stays booked. Of my 15 students, 4 are there specifically for jazz bass. I use Ed Freidland's book on building walking basslines, it is brilliant.

    I have a Master's in education, and teach because I like it, and use the extra $ to help pay for my kid's college. I would only consider doing it full time if I didn't have any choice. No benefits, and 20% of your students no show each week.

  22. #21

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    20% no show each week? Out of your 15 students, about 3 don't show up each and every week? Wow, that's crazy. I don't keep students who no-show, and I don't have any problems with it.

  23. #22

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    When I moved to France 10 years ago, I could not find work in my profession (I was an executive in the IT industry) so I taught English in Junior High and guitar privately. Teaching English basically sucked as out of 25 students, perhaps 3 or 4 really want to learn. And personally I don't enjoy teaching English... Guitar is another thing.

    I agree with most of what's been said. Almost all of my students want to learn rock/metal. I require that they learn folk and blues and learn to read at least a little music.

    I've only had a hand full of students in ten years who have been no fun - I didn't keep them as students.

    No-shows happen but are rare. More common is a cancellation warned in advance - it's still a loss of income. So I count on 80% of my my maximum revenue as a baseline.

    I can limit the number of students to however many I want. Nice. The hours are not great.

    Don't think that ten students = ten hours. There's a lot of preparatory work to do, certainly in the beginning. You can teach 'standards' of all genres, but at a certain point, each student needs to find their own voice and will need to learn songs which you don't know. It can be fun and illuminating, but working out all that tab and chord diagrams takes a lot of time.

    There's no safety net!!! There's no pension, medical coverage (depending on where you live), unemployment coverage, or vacation pay :-( You can declare some of your income of course and set yourself up with some status which can provide some of the above, but it's never satisfactory. Three years ago, I was found to have an auto-immune system and neurological problem which causes me to have 24x7 enormous headaches and is screwing up my joints, especially my fingers. Playing is hard. Listening to students play is even harder. Therefore, I limit myself right now to only 6 students a week - very poor pay. But the music DOES help me in many ways, and is actually slowing down the neurological degradation!

    There IS a lot of satisfaction to be had from helping those 3 or 4 students in a school class become more aware of music, the arts and so forth, but certainly the one on one of private tuition is hard to beat.

    Musicology? I'm an anthropologist and a musician so I have a headstart. I'm also a practicing shaman and healer... ummm... (doesn't work on myself) Musicology can pertain to healthcare or to cultural understanding. A degree in musicology is only a very raw starting point and would certainly require an MA afterwards to be useful, and probably a doctorate - I'm working on my doctorate in anthropology now. Sometimes it gets in the way of my music, more often than not, the music slows down my studies and research :-) Go figure...

    Hope this helps a little.
    Good luck.

  24. #23

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    Quote Originally Posted by tonyknight
    When I moved to France 10 years ago, I could not find work in my profession (I was an executive in the IT industry) so I taught English in Junior High and guitar privately. Teaching English basically sucked as out of 25 students, perhaps 3 or 4 really want to learn. And personally I don't enjoy teaching English... Guitar is another thing.

    I agree with most of what's been said. Almost all of my students want to learn rock/metal. I require that they learn folk and blues and learn to read at least a little music.

    I've only had a hand full of students in ten years who have been no fun - I didn't keep them as students.

    No-shows happen but are rare. More common is a cancellation warned in advance - it's still a loss of income. So I count on 80% of my my maximum revenue as a baseline.

    I can limit the number of students to however many I want. Nice. The hours are not great.

    Don't think that ten students = ten hours. There's a lot of preparatory work to do, certainly in the beginning. You can teach 'standards' of all genres, but at a certain point, each student needs to find their own voice and will need to learn songs which you don't know. It can be fun and illuminating, but working out all that tab and chord diagrams takes a lot of time.

    There's no safety net!!! There's no pension, medical coverage (depending on where you live), unemployment coverage, or vacation pay :-( You can declare some of your income of course and set yourself up with some status which can provide some of the above, but it's never satisfactory. Three years ago, I was found to have an auto-immune system and neurological problem which causes me to have 24x7 enormous headaches and is screwing up my joints, especially my fingers. Playing is hard. Listening to students play is even harder. Therefore, I limit myself right now to only 6 students a week - very poor pay. But the music DOES help me in many ways, and is actually slowing down the neurological degradation!

    There IS a lot of satisfaction to be had from helping those 3 or 4 students in a school class become more aware of music, the arts and so forth, but certainly the one on one of private tuition is hard to beat.

    Musicology? I'm an anthropologist and a musician so I have a headstart. I'm also a practicing shaman and healer... ummm... (doesn't work on myself) Musicology can pertain to healthcare or to cultural understanding. A degree in musicology is only a very raw starting point and would certainly require an MA afterwards to be useful, and probably a doctorate - I'm working on my doctorate in anthropology now. Sometimes it gets in the way of my music, more often than not, the music slows down my studies and research :-) Go figure...

    Hope this helps a little.
    Good luck.

    Thanks, this does help. I know that musiology jobs are EXTREMELY rare, as I have ontacted countless US agencies asking what kind of jobs are availble and requirements there are. Keep in mind I was a jazz major at American School of Modern Music (I lived in that American dorm off George VI) and at UNT eight years ago. Unfortunately, several things have hapenned, I tore my shoulder 14 months ago which slowed me down and fored me to leave the combo I was in, then I wanted to live out my dream and study the music of forefathers, Subcontinental music. Then something happened in Pakistan preventing me from going (I was there three years ago and was already apprehensive) so the next thing to do is study ethno/musicology. I am only 29 (even though my beard is turning prematurely grey) and want to live my life the way I want to-studying music. Teaching privately would give me quite a bit of time to do so. If I sign the contract with Harmony Music School out here in Vegas, I will already have three-four hours a week. I don't have to pay taxes and for $36-$40/hour I can't beat that.

    One question I have for ALL of you guys-I spoke with my guitar tech and financial advisor who ust moved to Virginia/D.C. and told me that I should leave Nevada if I wanted to make serious money teaching privately, because Nevada has 14% unemployment rate and nobody has the time or money to send thier children for music education, and that I should research and move to a better market. You guys live across the world, tell me if your state's/county's economy yields better opportunity than Nv.
    This town is great for sessionists and what I call "Strip performers" that always get alled to gig with Blue Man Group, Lion King or at some casino show, however the education here is dead last in the country. We graduate 55% of our high school students

  25. #24

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    BTW, I sincerely appreciate ALL of your input. As I've told Derek and Mr. B before, this site is the ONLY community I can actually trust!

  26. #25

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    Hi jazzyteach, you certainly have the musical background so, yes, why not go for the ethnographic research and cultural background as well, They both seriously challenging disciplines and pay about as well as each other :-) Being a musician you can always make a living if you work hard (my living doesn't come from anthropology or ethnology)!

    To your last question, where I live in France, $25 would represent the high end of private lesson fees... I also live in a very 'poor' region and yes, it's become a lot more difficult to find students during the last couple of years. But I do find students as young as 6 or 7, and occasionally well into their retirement by being flexible with what and HOW they want to learn... Very few want to learn theory - or at least they don't want to realise that they are being taught theory:-) so use the songs to bring the theory out and they usually appreciate that.

    I think that if you work at it, andhave a good rapport with your students, you can find them and the income anywhere...

    Good luck. Carpe Diem...

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by Stackabones
    20% no show each week? Out of your 15 students, about 3 don't show up each and every week? Wow, that's crazy. I don't keep students who no-show, and I don't have any problems with it.
    Yeah, you know how it is. Johnny's sick, Nancy had to work late, Joey has an evening school program. Typically people pay me monthly, and if they miss, it is on them. However, I will try to reschedule if I have any time another day that week. Since I don't do this FT, I am mostly a softy regarding this though. If I did it for a living, I would be firm about it.