1. #1

    User Info Menu

    It would be interesting and challenging to try this instrumentally, and I intend to. It's a gem.

    I post the entire youtube page, so you can take your pick from first-rate versions by The Chairman; Chris Connor; Eydie Gorme; others.

    I love the lyric b/c it uses a simple device so effectively: assigning a 'color' to the wind for every season of a romance. The melodic construction also is noteworthy: it peaks very nicely at the very last strain---then comes down on the final '...when the wind was green'...

    when the wind was green - YouTube

  2.  

    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2
    Anyone? This is a wonderfully made song, and all the above performances are lovely.

    Give it a shot...

  4. #3

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Anyone? This is a wonderfully made song, and all the above performances are lovely.

    Give it a shot...
    For me, J,
    The most difficult aspect of arranging this tune for guitar is to keep it flowing in 3/4 without making it "sing-song." I would probably play it in 2/4 to avoid this as well as making the chord changes flow without jumping ie; 123 jump// 123 jump etc. Good luck on your arrangement. Good playing . . . Marinero

  5. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    For me, J,
    The most difficult aspect of arranging this tune for guitar is to keep it flowing in 3/4 without making it "sing-song." I would probably play it in 2/4 to avoid this as well as making the chord changes flow without jumping ie; 123 jump// 123 jump etc. Good luck on your arrangement. Good playing . . . Marinero
    Interesting. Kindly expand on 'sing-song'---too much married to a vocalist approach?

  6. #5

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Interesting. Kindly expand on 'sing-song'---too much married to a vocalist approach?
    Hi, J,
    Here's a second reply! I just lost the first with a click of the button. So, within the first two bars, 3/4 is clearly established. And, for me, it is a tempo that is difficult to arrange in a chord-melody for JG. The problem is that 3/4 time(for me) establishes a clearly defined tempo where it seems impossible to avoid the repetitive, sing-song feel that is inherent in this time signature. And, if you're writing creatively, it's nearly impossible to avoid writing the chord changes on the first beat of each measure since, if done on the offbeat it, for me, destroys the cadence musically. However in 2/4 or even 4/4 ,for that matter, the arranger has the ability to stream his melody over moving chord changes off the beat that add to the arrangements musicality and interest. And, with this song, it would be quite simple to do so for a practitioner of this dark art. This is probably why there are so few Jazz pieces written in 3/4, while it is more common in Classical music a la Strauss and that school. Finally, when I do an arrangement, I like to avoid sameness, predictability, and banality--three consequences of triple time. I hope this makes sense. Good playing . . . Marinero

  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Hi, J,
    Here's a second reply! I just lost the first with a click of the button. So, within the first two bars, 3/4 is clearly established. And, for me, it is a tempo that is difficult to arrange in a chord-melody for JG. The problem is that 3/4 time(for me) establishes a clearly defined tempo where it seems impossible to avoid the repetitive, sing-song feel that is inherent in this time signature. And, if you're writing creatively, it's nearly impossible to avoid writing the chord changes on the first beat of each measure since, if done on the offbeat it, for me, destroys the cadence musically. However in 2/4 or even 4/4 ,for that matter, the arranger has the ability to stream his melody over moving chord changes off the beat that add to the arrangements musicality and interest. And, with this song, it would be quite simple to do so for a practitioner of this dark art. This is probably why there are so few Jazz pieces written in 3/4, while it is more common in Classical music a la Strauss and that school. Finally, when I do an arrangement, I like to avoid sameness, predictability, and banality--three consequences of triple time. I hope this makes sense. Good playing . . . Marinero
    Maybe. Try it with a singer. Myself, I can hear it as is for solo guitar---with pauses between measures to break up the monotony of the chord on the 1st beat---take the listener's attention somewhere else. Could work, long as you don't beat it to death--as your idea could too...

  8. #7
    Marinero: I just tried it on for size---randomly in G. I find it a good fit w/o too much harmonic tweaking. I love the melody, and that kind of spacey harmonic rhythm is made to order for the way I play. I'd do it kinda slow with, say a trio. The only thing I'd abridge is the coda, or tag, or whatever it is at the end of the form. It makes the form longer than necessary, and doesn't make sense w/o the lyric. I'd save it for the very end...

  9. #8

    User Info Menu

    Quote Originally Posted by joelf
    Marinero: I just tried it on for size---randomly in G. I find it a good fit w/o too much harmonic tweaking. I love the melody, and that kind of spacey harmonic rhythm is made to order for the way I play. I'd do it kinda slow with, say a trio. The only thing I'd abridge is the coda, or tag, or whatever it is at the end of the form. It makes the form longer than necessary, and doesn't make sense w/o the lyric. I'd save it for the very end...
    Hi, J,
    It helps to love the melody. Isn't this why we play songs! And, it gives you energy when you get bogged down creatively and don't get the sound(s)/idea(s) you want. I once did that with an arrangement of "Ruby, My Dear," T. M. for guitar ,many years ago, and really struggled to get what I wanted to say musically. I just couldn't get it right so it went into my folder of unfinished works and years later, picked it up and finished it in a couple days. Although I think I could revive it, it was one of the pieces I lost during one of my moves. Good luck on your project. Good playing . . . Marinero

  10. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Marinero
    Hi, J,
    It helps to love the melody. Isn't this why we play songs! And, it gives you energy when you get bogged down creatively and don't get the sound(s)/idea(s) you want. I once did that with an arrangement of "Ruby, My Dear," T. M. for guitar ,many years ago, and really struggled to get what I wanted to say musically. I just couldn't get it right so it went into my folder of unfinished works and years later, picked it up and finished it in a couple days. Although I think I could revive it, it was one of the pieces I lost during one of my moves. Good luck on your project. Good playing . . . Marinero
    The song tells us what to play. All the info's there, we just need to pay attention. If players are truly creative and distinctive---and secure in that, their stamp will be there, no need to force. That stuff ain't going anywhere.

    I let the song play me...