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  1. #1

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    Found it today on youtube. Absolutely great. If anybody is able to check the triads out quick I d be very happy. I m near measure 6 and not too sure about it.
    Have fun and enjoy.


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    The Jazz Guitar Chord Dictionary
     
  3. #2

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    Nifty!
    Hadn't seen John with a beard before...

  4. #3

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    He was sitting in at Small's tonight, and has the beard. I didn't recognize him at first. He was introduced as an unannounced and unpaid guest. He can play, beard or no beard.

  5. #4

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    Micheal,

    Thanks for posting this. I've seen him play this before, but couldn't quite figure out what he was playing.

    I'm just getting started with this kind of comping where you harmonize a moving bass line. So this is very helpful to me. I can clearly see what he's doing. I just need to try it out on the guitar tomorrow.

    Post what you came up with. Maybe we can help each other out on this one.

  6. #5
    Hey, Jack!
    Here´s the first run as I see/hear it. Working on more.
    What do you think?

    Bbmaj6 6x57xx
    B° 7x57xx
    Cm7 8x88xx
    F7 x878xx
    Dm7 10x1010xx
    C#° 9x89xx
    Cm7 8x88xx
    F7 x878xx

  7. #6

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    Hey Mike, this is what I came up with:

    A 1 and 2
    Bar 1 - Bb6 6x57xx
    Bar 1 - Bdim 7x67xx

    Bar 2 - Cm7 8x88xx
    Bar 2 - F7 x878xx

    Bar 3 - Bbmaj7/D 10x8 10xx (Dm7 works fine, but I think he's playing Bbmaj7/D)
    Bar 3 - C#dim 9x89xx

    Bar 4 - Cm7 8x88xx
    Bar 4 - F7 x878xx

    Bar 5 - Fm7 x868xx
    Bar 5 - Bb7 6x67xx

    Bar 6 - Ebmaj7 x658xx
    Bar 6 - Edim x756xx

    Bar 7 - F9sus x8888x

    Bar 8 - Bb6 6x57xx
    Bar 8 - F9 x8788x (only in 1st "A" section)


    Bridge

    Bar 17 - Am7 5x55xx

    Bar 18 - D7 x545xx

    Bar 19 - G7 3x34xx
    Bar 19 - Adim 5x45xx

    Bar 20 - Bbdim 6x56
    Bar 20 - G7/B 7x57

    Bar 21 - C7 8x89
    Bar 21 - Ddim 10x9 10xx

    Bar 22 - D#dim 11x10 11xx
    Bar 22 - C7 12x10 12xx

    Bar 23 - Cm6 8x788x

    Bar 24 - F13 x6776x


    A 3
    Bars 25-30 same as 2nd "A" section

    Bar 31 - Bb6
    Bar 31 - G#13

    Bar 32 - G7

    Bar 33 - C9/G 3x233x
    Bar 33 - F9/C 8x788x

    Bar 34 - Bb6

    I think this is close. Let me know if you find any errors or better suggestions.

  8. #7

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    This is pretty damn cool...one time through the form of "Rhythm" and John introduces every shape you'll ever need to play rhythm like this.

    Now comes the lifetime of practice...it is it's own ART.

  9. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack E Blue
    I think this is close. Let me know if you find any errors or better suggestions.
    Wow, Jack!
    I´m impressed. I thought of a Dm7 in some form in bar 5/6 and that was leading me in a dead end.
    Played through your version once by now and it really comes good under the fingers and sounds totally good.
    Would have taken me at least 14 days to come nearby.
    I´ll play it a few more times and see if I find some suggestions, but by now I think it´s perfect.
    ThankXXL!

  10. #9
    Played through it a few times and came out with adding a G on top in bar 6, which turns out in
    Bar6 - Ebmaj7 x6588x
    Bar6 - Edim x7568x
    and for the F13 in Bar 24 I play a Bbmaj7, sounds better to me.
    In every case it´s a fun tune to play. The chromatic run in the bridge is my favourite.

  11. #10

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    I'm guessing this is the video referenced by the OP, Bill Frisell says around 5:50 'I'll need around 4 hours to work out what he ( JP) 's doing'

    ...looks like you guys cracked it...


  12. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael1968
    Played through it a few times and came out with adding a G on top in bar 6, which turns out in
    Bar6 - Ebmaj7 x6588x
    Bar6 - Edim x7568x
    and for the F13 in Bar 24 I play a Bbmaj7, sounds better to me.
    In every case it´s a fun tune to play. The chromatic run in the bridge is my favourite.
    I think that is what it's all about - take someone else's idea and put your own touch on it.

  13. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Jack E Blue
    I think that is what it's all about - take someone else's idea and put your own touch on it.
    ...and it is absolute great that in this forum players from all over the world are working together on things like this, no matter if one of them is playing two leagues up from the other.
    Thank you!!!

  14. #13

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    I just stopped in at my fave used records store, and picked up John P.'s "Jazz Guitar Virtuoso Video' on Mel Bay for only $1.99. Sweet deal!

  15. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by sgcim
    I just stopped in at my fave used records store, and picked up John P.'s "Jazz Guitar Virtuoso Video' on Mel Bay for only $1.99. Sweet deal!
    Is this course by Bucky Pizzarelli (whose 1st name is actually John) or his son, John, in the video above? I know both have done courses. Either way that's a real bargain.

  16. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack E Blue
    Is this course by Bucky Pizzarelli (whose 1st name is actually John) or his son, John, in the video above? I know both have done courses. Either way that's a real bargain.
    It's the kid.

  17. #16

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    Those are the sorts of voicings i use for rhythm on loads of my gigs. Actually they are just generally brilliant for comping for another guitar, or an alto player. I think Jonathan Stout said they come from Van Eps?

  18. #17

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    Also I’ve heard it said they are derived from banjo voicings, because open triads work well and are easy to finger on an instrument tuned in 5ths (think Bach cello suites) George Van Eps’ dad was a noted banjo virtuoso.

  19. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Also I’ve heard it said they are derived from banjo voicings, because open triads work well and are easy to finger on an instrument tuned in 5ths (think Bach cello suites) George Van Eps’ dad was a noted banjo virtuoso.
    ...and George van Eps invented the 7-string-guitar, which closes the circle over Bucky to John Pizzarelli.

  20. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Also I’ve heard it said they are derived from banjo voicings, because open triads work well and are easy to finger on an instrument tuned in 5ths (think Bach cello suites) George Van Eps’ dad was a noted banjo virtuoso.
    Frank Vignola (Grand National Canadian Banjo Champion at the age of 12) said something about early jazz guitarists coming out of that tradition & bringing the voicings with them - over to the banjo handlers ?

  21. #20

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    Lovely thread, thanks to you all.

    Most of this is also included in the book "Rhythm Guitar the Ranger Doug Way."

  22. #21

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    This page has some useful examples:

    A Comparative Study of Rhythm Guitar Styles

  23. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Also I’ve heard it said they are derived from banjo voicings, because open triads work well and are easy to finger on an instrument tuned in 5ths (think Bach cello suites) George Van Eps’ dad was a noted banjo virtuoso.
    I've heard other early jazz guitarists played banjo (usu tenor bango) before switching to guitar. Freddie Green was one. (He started on ukelele, then banjo, finally guitar.)

  24. #23

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    From the site GrahmBop linked to above, an article on the "Tenor Banjo to Rhythm Guitar Hypothesis."

    A New Hypothesis About Freddie Green's Guitar Technique, by Albert Romaní

  25. #24

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    Howard Alden is another guitarist who started on banjo, and still plays it now and then. He moved to guitar, and then 7-string guitar after studying and playing with Van Eps, whose influence is widespread.

  26. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    I've heard other early jazz guitarists played banjo (usu tenor bango) before switching to guitar. Freddie Green was one. (He started on ukelele, then banjo, finally guitar.)
    FG also had lessons with Van Eps ahahaha

  27. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkRhodes
    From the site GrahmBop linked to above, an article on the "Tenor Banjo to Rhythm Guitar Hypothesis."

    A New Hypothesis About Freddie Green's Guitar Technique, by Albert Romaní
    Oh yeah I read this a few years back, changed my life. John P sometimes plays this way iirc, as does James Chirillo.

    BTW I’m fairly sure FG is is not playing this way on the early Basie stuff. Check out Savory Collection vol2. FG is very audible and playing I think bigger chords. Also there is shit ton of absolutely burning Prez on that live recording.

  28. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77

    BTW I’m fairly sure FG is is not playing this way on the early Basie stuff. Check out Savory Collection vol2. FG is very audible and playing I think bigger chords. Also there is shit ton of absolutely burning Prez on that live recording.
    I think you're right, at least to my ears...sometimes I can't tell what I'm hearing on those records and what I'm "filling in."

    He was definitely playing all six strings a lot of the time...

  29. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Oh yeah I read this a few years back, changed my life. John P sometimes plays this way iirc, as does James Chirillo.

    BTW I’m fairly sure FG is is not playing this way on the early Basie stuff. Check out Savory Collection vol2. FG is very audible and playing I think bigger chords. Also there is shit ton of absolutely burning Prez on that live recording.
    Freddie's style evolved. When he was with a smaller group (The Kansas City Seven) he had more room.

  30. #29

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    What a Class Act! So impressed not only by John Pizzarelli's guitar playing,but his openness to music and people interested in it at all levels.
    This is what music is about and making connections with people. Unfortunately most rock musicians not only have much more limited vocabulary, but limited experience with connecting to with their actual audience members.

    I'm so lucky to have discovered Jazz music at an early age. It has allowed me to continue to grow as a musician. Unfortunately with rare exceptions,it doesn't offer much monetary rewards. But the musical education and journey is so worthwhile and frustrating at times LOL!

  31. #30

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    Of interest along the same line:

    http://acousticguitar.com/guitar-les...hm-essentials/

    The article in the magazine is also great!

  32. #31

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  33. #32

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    I often use the term walking tenor to describe FG's playing, as opposed to walking bass, with his emphasis on the fourth string in counterpoint to the bass. Is walking tenor a useful term, do you think, or misleading?

  34. #33

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    I love BF constant smile like someone just gave an appreciative child the best gift ever!

  35. #34

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob MacKillop
    I often use the term walking tenor to describe FG's playing, as opposed to walking bass, with his emphasis on the fourth string in counterpoint to the bass. Is walking tenor a useful term, do you think, or misleading?
    Works for me :-)

  36. #35

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    Then it's official!

  37. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by christianm77
    Works for me :-)
    Thus spake the Grand Wazoo, and well-said.

    Not to be mistaken with the Great Gazoo, a different order of magnitude in the pop culture firmament.